PUBLIC BUSINESS. - BUSINESS OF THE SEANAD.

AN CATHAOIRLEACH

Before we adjourn to-day we have to determine our sittings for next week.

There is a matter which Senator Sir John Keane asked me to raise when we were considering the business for next week. He asked me if it were possible to reach some kind of understanding in regard to the consideration of the Appropriation Bill. It is usual, I think, and is understood that the general discussion of the Estimates takes place in this House on the consideration of the Appropriation Bill. It is reasonably certain that we cannot expect the whole Ministry to attend here during that discussion, but, on the other hand, the raising of a point on the Estimates would not be of very great value if the questions raised were not answered. Senator Sir John Keane asked me to suggest without prejudice to the right of members to discuss any point on general discussion that notices might be sent out to members of the Seanad intimating that if they desired to raise any particular point notice should be given to the Seanad office the day before so that the Minister concerned could be notified. I am not sure that this would be the best arrangement, but for this year possibly his suggestion is a good one.

AN CATHAOIRLEACH

That could be met in this way. When we could definitely determine what day the Appropriation Bill will reach us we could arrange that any Senator who wishes to raise any particular point on any particular Estimate should hand in an intimation to the Clerk that upon consideration of the Appropriation Bill he proposes to call attention to such and such a matter. That would be an intimation to the particular Minister engaged.

I think he meant that when the Orders for the Day for next week are going out a note might be appended, saying that the Appropriation Bill would probably reach us next week or the week after.

AN CATHAOIRLEACH

It will require a little attention in the drafting, but I will see that some notice of that kind is put on the agenda. The only other question that we have to decide is when we shall meet next week; Wednesday is our normal day of meeting. There is no exceptional advantage to be gained by meeting on Tuesday. Possibly, it will be better for us to adhere to our normal day.

I think we should not meet until Thursday. It is scarcely possible that business will not reach us on Tuesday. There is something happening on Wednesday, and if we are to meet on that date it should be at 11 o'clock.

AN CATHAOIRLEACH

Is there any reason why we should not meet at 11.30?

In Leinster House?

AN CATHAOIRLEACH

That would be at 10.30.

What is the particular reason for meeting at 11 o'clock instead of three?

AN CATHAOIRLEACH

There have been mysterious hints and suggestions from various quarters. Senator McLoughlin had something on his mind. I think it is rather a mistake in view of the possibility of work that we should not meet before Thursday.

I take it that we have the remaining stages of about half of these nineteen Bills to get through, but that might not take very long. I do not think that there is going to be much more business ready for us.

AN CATHAOIRLEACH

Do you think that the House is likely to take any interest in the Dairy Produce Bill?

From what I hear, I do not think that it will reach us this Session.

I spoke to the Minister about it, and he expressed doubt about the Seanad being called upon to discuss it before the adjournment.

AN CATHAOIRLEACH

It is a very long Bill. In that event the House will meet at 11 o'clock on Thursday morning. I hope to see as many Senators as possible at Leinster House at half-past ten on that day.

The Seanad adjourned until 11 o'clock on Thursday, 24th July, 1924.