Tuesday, 26 February 2013

Questions (182, 194)

Michael McGrath

Question:

182. Deputy Michael McGrath asked the Minister for Finance his views of what constitutes conditions of financial stability in respect of the timetable for the sale by the Central Bank of Ireland of Irish Government bonds it has acquired as a result of the revised promissory note; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [9590/13]

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Pearse Doherty

Question:

194. Deputy Pearse Doherty asked the Minister for Finance further to Parliamentary Question No. 56 of 13 February 2013, if he will confirm what he means by conditions of financial stability; if such conditions exist today and, if not, by reference to what metric will he judge when such conditions have been met, and specifically if there is an interest rate metric by reference to which these bonds will not be diosposed of on the sovereign bond market. [9752/13]

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Written answers (Question to Finance)

I propose to take Questions Nos. 182 and 194 together.

The Government bonds are now held by the Central Bank of Ireland following the liquidation of IBRC.

Eight new Floating Rate Treasury Bonds have been issued to discharge the Promissory Notes liability consisting of:

- a 25 year bond of €2bn maturing in 2038 with an interest rate of 6-month Euribor plus a margin of 2.50%;

- a 28 year bond of €2bn maturing in 2041 with an interest rate of 6-month Euribor plus a margin of 2.53%;

- a 30 year bond of €2bn maturing in 2043 with an interest rate of 6-month Euribor plus a margin of 2.57%;

- a 32 year bond of €3bn maturing in 2045 with an interest rate of 6-month Euribor plus a margin of 2.60%;

- a 34 year bond of €3bn maturing in 2047 with an interest rate of 6-month Euribor plus a margin of 2.62%;

- a 36 year bond of €3bn maturing in 2049 with an interest rate of 6-month Euribor plus a margin of 2.65%;

- a 38 year bond of €5bn maturing in 2051 with an interest rate of 6-month Euribor plus a margin of 2.67%; and

- a 40 year bond of €5bn maturing in 2053 with an interest rate of 6-month Euribor plus a margin of 2.68%.

The bonds will pay interest every six months (June and December).

The Central Bank of Ireland will sell the bonds but only where such a sale is not disruptive to financial stability. The Central Bank have undertaken that a minimum of bonds will be sold in accordance with the following schedule: €0.5bn by the end of 2014, €0.5bn per annum from 2015 to 2018, €1bn per annum from 2019 to 2023 and €2bn per annum from 2024 onwards.

The Central Bank of Ireland is responsible for financial stability considerations. I would expect the Central Bank to take full account of the health of the domestic and international banking system, the global economic situation and developments in markets when considering financial stability considerations in relation to the disposal of these Irish government bonds.