Student Grant Scheme Eligibility

Questions (144)

Anthony Lawlor

Question:

144. Deputy Anthony Lawlor asked the Minister for Education and Skills if the nationality requirements for the student support regulations and student grant scheme for the 2013-14 academic year will include students who have permission to remain here because they are the dependent child of a person who has achieved Irish citizenship; if not, the reason; if he will outline that such students should be included rather than only those who are the dependent child of someone who has permission to remain because of marriage or civil partnership with an Irish national; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [33927/13]

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Written answers (Question to Education)

Under the terms of the student grant scheme, grant assistance is awarded to students who meet the prescribed conditions of funding including those which relate to nationality, residency, previous academic attainment and means. The nationality requirements for the student grant scheme are set out in section 14 of the Student Support Act 2011 and regulation 5 of the Student Support Regulations 2013.

In all cases, to qualify for a student grant, it is the grant applicant and not his/her parents that must meet the nationality or prescribed immigration status requirements in their own right. The onus is on the grant applicant to provide the necessary documentary evidence as proof of their nationality or immigration status to the relevant grant awarding authority.

Article 32 of the Student Grant Scheme 2013 provides for the review of eligibility for the award of a grant in the event of changes of circumstances in the academic year, including a change in relation to a students' nationality or immigration status. This means that where a student acquires Irish citizenship by naturalisation or acquires a prescribed immigration status during the course of their studies they may make an application in the academic year for a student grant.

I have asked my Department to examine the overall issue of the entitlement of non-EU families to third level fees and grants generally and I am currently considering the matter to ensure that there is clarity as to precise entitlements in this complex area. Any decision in relation to changes to the Student Grant Scheme including changes to eligibility criteria will need to be considered in the context of availability of resources.

Office of the Ombudsman Staff

Questions (145)

Andrew Doyle

Question:

145. Deputy Andrew Doyle asked the Minister for Public Expenditure and Reform the arrangements in place to seek a replacement for Ms Emily O'Reilly as the Ombudsman after she takes up her new role as the European Ombudsman; the process for an Acting Ombudsman until a new Ombudsman is appointed by the Government; the anticipated timeframe before the new Ombudsman is in situ; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [33745/13]

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Written answers (Question to Public)

The Government has under consideration the appointment of a successor to the present Ombudsman to take up duty when the latter relinquishes her office. The appointment of an interim Ombudsman is not envisaged.

Garda Stations Closures

Questions (146)

Catherine Murphy

Question:

146. Deputy Catherine Murphy asked the Minister for Public Expenditure and Reform the implications for telecommunications masts at some of the 40 Garda stations which the State proposes to sell; if such masts form part of the sale; if planning permission will be required for the masts if they are sold; if the State will incur any charge in respect of the masts as a direct result of the sales; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [33698/13]

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Written answers (Question to Public)

There are no implications for telecommunications masts at the 40 stations, recently announced, that the Commissioners of Public Works have identified for potential disposal.

Job Creation Issues

Questions (147)

Bernard Durkan

Question:

147. Deputy Bernard J. Durkan asked the Minister for Jobs, Enterprise and Innovation the extent to which science and innovation has assisted in job creation in respect of both the manufacturing and service sectors, including the domestic economy, in each of the past three years and to date in 2013; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [33654/13]

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Written answers (Question to Jobs)

As innovation and science are aspects of employment across most sectors it is not possible to disaggregate the information as sought by the Deputy. My Department and its agencies are focused on the development and support of internationally trading manufacturing and services firms in Ireland, and have a clear and steady focus on the potential and opportunities that exist and can be created by prioritising innovation and science as a key driver of success. Enterprise development agencies, Enterprise Ireland (EI), IDA Ireland and Science Foundation Ireland, provide a spectrum of innovation and science/technology development programmes that deliver financial, technical and experiential support to help companies become more innovative, encourage and support competitiveness, and help them grow their sales and exports in order to create a climate in which sustainable employment will grow and expand.

The importance of innovation to Ireland has been well recognised by the Government as being crucial to growth in both our indigenous and FDI sectors. It was most encouraging to see that the recent European Commission’s Innovation Union Scoreboard, published in spring 2013, shows Ireland retaining its position among those EU Member States with above average performance in their research and innovation systems. In addition, improvements have taken place in Ireland’s cost competitiveness, reflected in the fact that, in 2013, Ireland’s international competitiveness ranking improved three places from 20th in 2011, to 17th in the IMD World Competitiveness Yearbook for 2013 published in May. Ireland is 6th out of the 25 EU countries featured. In addition IBM’s Global Location Trends Report of 2012 places Ireland:

- 1st in the world for inward investment by quality and value;

- 1st in Europe for jobs created in Research and Development;

- 1st in Europe for investment in the pharmaceutical sector; and,

- 2nd is Europe and 4th globally for the number of investment jobs per capita.

These indicators correspond well with the stated ambition of our Taoiseach to make Ireland the best small country in the world in which to do business by 2016.

Foreign Direct Investment

Questions (148, 151)

Bernard Durkan

Question:

148. Deputy Bernard J. Durkan asked the Minister for Jobs, Enterprise and Innovation the extent to which this country remains an attractive location for foreign direct investment, notwithstanding the unhelpful allegations that this jurisdiction was being used as a tax haven; the initiatives taken to counter such allegations; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [33655/13]

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Bernard Durkan

Question:

151. Deputy Bernard J. Durkan asked the Minister for Jobs, Enterprise and Innovation the extent to which he continues to counter allegations of existence of a tax haven here with a view to ensuring that such allegations are not allowed to undermine international confidence and impede foreign direct investment; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [33658/13]

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Written answers (Question to Jobs)

I propose to take Questions Nos. 148 and 151 together.

The Government, in response to the allegations that Ireland is being used as a tax haven, has continued to refute these allegations and to outline how, since the 1950s, successive Governments have consistently agreed a competitive corporation tax rate as a means to attract investment and jobs to Ireland.

IDA Ireland is the agency with statutory responsibility for the attraction of foreign direct investment (FDI) to Ireland and its regions. In executing its mandate, IDA Ireland engages with corporate entities, as the primary decision makers around FDI investment. IDA Ireland markets Ireland as a location for FDI on the basis of a number of selling points, including an attractive corporate tax rate. IDA Ireland recently undertook a media road-show in New York to counter claims that Ireland is a tax haven and to explain how the Irish corporate tax system operates. The media road-show involved a prime time speaking opportunity on CNBC, the most watched business news network in the United States. The resulting interview was subsequently re-cycled through various social media channels. The Chief Executive of IDA, Mr Barry O’Leary, also held briefings with correspondents from influential outlets including the New York Times and Bloomberg on the issue of Corporate Tax and FDI. IDA Ireland has indicated that it continues to seek opportunities to relay Ireland’s message on corporate tax to key media.

Over 152,000 people are employed directly by 1,000 IDA client companies in Ireland. IDA Ireland has established strong and credible links with its client companies through direct meetings which are supported by overseas missions led by the Taoiseach and Ministers. These meetings provide IDA with the opportunity to reassure its clients about Ireland’s continued commitment to the 12.5% Corporation Tax rate and the actions taken by the Irish Government in the context of work undertaken by the OECD with regard to Base Erosion and Profit Shifting work and the progress made during Ireland’s Presidency of EU to address failings in the international tax system. In regard to the latter, considerable progress was made:

- Throughout the course of the Irish Presidency, Ireland prioritised files that will deliver on “Stability, Jobs and Growth” and outlined how an open, transparent and fair international taxation system is an essential prerequisite to this goal;

- In May, Ireland brokered an ECOFIN agreement on aggressive tax planning and good governance, which was acknowledged by Member States as a significant achievement;

- Ireland secured agreement that such international tax issues cannot be solved by unilateral action by individual countries and stressed the importance of coordination with the OCED;

- A Roadmap for action against aggressive tax planning was outlined in Ireland’s Presidency conclusions;

- The OECD’s Base Erosion and Profit Shifting (BEPS) project represents that response and BEPS will be the main toolkit of the global effort to tackle these issues;

- The OECD’s report on BEPS will be presented to the G20 in July.

It should also be noted that the OECD acknowledged that Ireland had given “smart and constructive assistance” to developing an international plan for preventing multinationals escaping paying corporation tax altogether. A proposal for addressing the issue is expected to be published shortly and it is envisaged that the measures involved will be implemented over the following two years.

EU Funding

Questions (149)

Bernard Durkan

Question:

149. Deputy Bernard J. Durkan asked the Minister for Jobs, Enterprise and Innovation the extent to which foreign direct and indigenous investors creating employment in the manufacturing, services and/or domestic/retail economy have been able to avail of European grant aid under the heading of Research, Innovation and Science; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [33656/13]

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Written answers (Question to Jobs)

The Seventh EU Framework Programme for Research and Development (FP7), with a budget of €55 billion for the period 2007 to 2013, is currently the EU’s main instrument for funding research and development in Europe. FP7 offers Ireland's SMEs, multinationals, and research institutions valuable opportunities to participate in high-calibre research collaborations with our European counterparts.

Job creation and, equally important, job maintenance is increasingly underpinned by science, technology and innovation including, for example, in the pharmaceutical, ICT, agri-food, medical devices, engineering and even financial services sectors which are developing innovative products and services. FP7 enables companies to work with academic research groups and other industry players across Europe and derive the benefits associated with collaborative research. This enables them to gain benefits such as access to knowledge networks, access to specialist equipment, sharing of costs and risks and, in particular for industry, the possibility of opening up commercial opportunities.

Ireland’s researchers and companies have been involved in more than 1,500 successful applications obtaining European Commission funding of approximately €485 million (2007-2012) under FP7. The overall Irish success rate at 22.7%, is above the European Member State average of 22.1%, and a very positive indication of the prospects for Irish participation over the lifetime of FP7, and broadly in line with our national target of obtaining a funding total of approximately €600 million when the programme ends in 2013.

Negotiations on the successor to FP7, Horizon 2020 covering the period 2014 – 2020, have recently been concluded under the Irish Presidency and we are currently putting in place a system of national support structures with a view to maximising our return from Horizon 2020 and building on the success of our participation levels under FP7.

Economic Competitiveness

Question No. 151 answered with Question No. 148

Questions (150)

Bernard Durkan

Question:

150. Deputy Bernard J. Durkan asked the Minister for Jobs, Enterprise and Innovation the extent to which he continues to monitor any inhibitive inflation in the economy which might impede or discourage indigenous or foreign direct investment in employment-generating projects; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [33657/13]

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Written answers (Question to Jobs)

Inflation in Ireland as measured by the EU Harmonised Index of Consumer Prices has consistently been well below the EU and Euro Area average in the period 2008 -2012. This has played a major part in helping to restore a significant proportion of our competitiveness losses in the preceding years. Latest available data for the 12 month period to April 2013 indicates that Ireland continues to outperform most of our European counterparts.

The recently published Forfas report “Costs of Doing Business in Ireland 2012” is an important report in the context of our need to continue to build an export-led recovery. It looks at the relative importance of different areas of cost for different sectors.

The report indicates that business costs in Ireland have reduced significantly in recent years, with overall price levels in the economy falling back to levels last experienced in 2002. The improvement in business cost competitiveness has been driven by significant reductions in property related costs (in terms of purchase and rent levels) and falling prices across a range of professional and business services. There have also been relative improvements in labour costs in Ireland which fell on average by 0.9% per annum in the period 2008-2011, while labour costs increased in the euro area by 4.6% per annum on average in the same period.

However, while these improvements are very welcome and indicate that the economy is moving in the right direction, we must continue to focus on actions to promote further cost reductions across the economy. The Forfás report advises that over half of recent cost competitiveness gains are attributable to favourable exchange rate movements. The report also indicates that upward price pressure is beginning to emerge in some areas.

The Forfás report makes a number of recommendations aimed at further improving our cost competitiveness position in relation to labour, property, transport, utility and professional services costs. Part of the objective of the Action Plan for Jobs has been the development of proposals each year that can improve our competitiveness. The 2013 Action Plan includes a number of specific actions in this regard which address some of the areas highlighted in the Forfas report.

Action 126 of the Action Plan requires that Forfás will, this year, compare consumer price levels and consumer price inflation in Ireland with prices in our key competitors. They will identify the primary drivers of price and inflation differentials and assess the impacts of cost of living in Ireland on labour costs and other business costs.

The implementation of these Action Plan measures, combined with the Government’s broader agenda to enhance productivity, will play a key role in improving our competitiveness and realising our ambition of making Ireland the best small country in which to do business.

Question No. 151 answered with Question No. 148.

Economic Competitiveness

Questions (152)

Bernard Durkan

Question:

152. Deputy Bernard J. Durkan asked the Minister for Jobs, Enterprise and Innovation the extent to which he continuously monitors this country’s economic competitiveness; if any particular issues have been identified as disincentives in this regard; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [33659/13]

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Written answers (Question to Jobs)

The National Competitiveness Council (NCC) reports to me on key competitiveness issues facing the Irish economy and offers recommendations on policy actions required to enhance Ireland’s competitive position. The Council is supported in its work by Forfas, who monitor Ireland’s competitiveness on an on-going basis. The NCC has recently been reconfigured to provide greater synergy between the Council’s recommendations and the development and implementation of the Government’s Action Plan for Jobs. Six leading industrial figures who have been assigned to assist with the implementation of the seven "Disruptive Reforms" as part of the Action Plan for Jobs were appointed to the NCC in May of this year.

Ireland is already rated highly internationally as one of the best countries in the world in which to do business, and we have built a strong competitive basis on which to compete on global markets. Ireland has moved up three places to 17th place in the IMD’s World Competitiveness Yearbook 2013 having being ranked 24th only 2 years ago, while Ireland is ranked 15th in the World Bank’s Doing Business 2012 Report.

There are a number of key areas where Ireland tops global competitiveness rankings, including:

- business impact of rules on foreign direct investment;

- inflation;

- FDI and technology transfer;

- availability of skilled labour;

- flexibility and adaptability of the labour force; and

- investment incentives.

While Ireland’s competitiveness has improved in recent years, we must continue to do more, though the Action Plan for Jobs, to ensure that these competitiveness gains are not eroded as the economy begins to recover. The 2013 Action Plan for Jobs includes a range of concrete measures to address issues which impact negatively on our competitiveness position. The implementation of these actions, combined with the Government’s broader agenda to enhance productivity, will play a key role in improving our competitiveness and realising our ambition of making Ireland the best small country in which to do business.

Employment Support Services

Questions (153)

Bernard Durkan

Question:

153. Deputy Bernard J. Durkan asked the Minister for Jobs, Enterprise and Innovation the total number of incentives currently available to employers to increase their workforce in the short and medium term, with particular reference to alleviation of the numbers of long-term unemployed and youth unemployed; if he will indicate the number of such positions taken up to date; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [33660/13]

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Written answers (Question to Jobs)

Supports to employers to increase their workforce are primarily provided through the Department of Social Protection. The Minister for Social Protection, Joan Burton, T.D., has been rolling out a new streamlined service, known as Intreo, which offers practical, tailored employment services and supports for jobseekers and employers alike. The new service includes the provision of recruitment and job-matching services for employers, to facilitate the hiring of workers from the Live Register. Along with the Taoiseach, Tanaiste and Minister Burton, I launched the new JobsPlus Incentive on 8 July. JobsPlus is a new initiative which encourages employers to offer employment opportunities to the long term unemployed.

The Incentive will provide two levels of payment: a payment of €7,500 over two years to an employer for each person recruited who has been unemployed for more than 12 months, but less than 24 months, and a payment of €10,000 over two years for each person recruited who has been unemployed for more than 24 months. The new Incentive will be payable monthly in arrears. In order to qualify, an employer must offer full time employment of at least 30 hours per week, spanning at least four days per week, to eligible recruits.

Details of the full range of services available to employers through Intreo, and of the JobsPlus initiative are available on the Department of Social Protection’s website, www.welfare.ie.

Retail Sector Issues

Questions (154)

Bernard Durkan

Question:

154. Deputy Bernard J. Durkan asked the Minister for Jobs, Enterprise and Innovation the extent to which he continues to monitor the various contributing factors in the closure of retail outlets with consequent job losses; if high rents/rates has emerged as a contributing factor; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [33661/13]

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Written answers (Question to Jobs)

In the current economic climate, a range of factors are impacting on closures of retail outlets, including changing patterns of consumer behaviour through on-line trading.

I am aware that many retail companies are concerned about the impact which rates and rents - particularly upward only rent reviews - are having on their cost base. When the Government came into office, it gave extensive consideration to abolishing upward-only rent reviews in leases signed before 28th February 2010. The advice received by the Government was that it was not possible to develop a scheme to tackle this issue that would not be vulnerable to a Constitutional challenge or compensation claims from landlords. On the basis of this advice, the Government concluded that it was not feasible to legislate to abolish upward only rent reviews.

However, the Government has taken steps to address the issue where possible. In the Action Plan for Jobs 2012, the Government undertook to place downward pressure on commercial rents where the National Asset Management Agency (NAMA) had acquired the loan on the underlying property.

The 2013 Action Plan includes a number of specific commitments to support the retail sector, including an initiative to increase the number of businesses trading on-line and a project to develop a single business licence application portal for the sector. My Department is also chairing an Interdepartmental Group to undertake a short examination of further possible measures to assist the retail sector, which could, for example, be considered in the context of the Budget or the 2014 Action Plan for Jobs. The Group comprises key Government Departments and has already met with the main representative bodies for the retail sector. The Group will hold a further series of meetings with other stakeholders this week.

Employment Rights Issues

Questions (155)

Bernard Durkan

Question:

155. Deputy Bernard J. Durkan asked the Minister for Jobs, Enterprise and Innovation if he will examine the situation whereby workers from non-EU countries who have been in full-time employment, paid their taxes and were of the understanding that their works permits had been updated and in order and who now find that they were/are illegally employed, obviously through no fault of their own, with a view to ensuring that they can regularise their position without discrimination; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [33662/13]

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Written answers (Question to Jobs)

The Deputy is referring to foreign nationals as defined under the Employment Permits Acts 2003 and 2006 as foreign nationals other than nationals of member states of the EEA and Switzerland, often referred to as 3rd country nationals. The law is clear on the matter of employment of 3rd country nationals - it is illegal for such a 3rd country national to be employed without the State’s permission and it is an offence for both the 3rd country national and the employer concerned. Illegal employment of 3rd country nationals creates a serious problem for the employees concerned in that they do not have a legally binding contract of employment and cannot therefore rely on such a contract in asserting their rights under the contract and under the wide spectrum of employment rights legislation.

Following the result of this in the High Court judgement concerning Mr. Younis, I committed to amending the legislation in order to provide a defence for the employee which will then give the courts some discretion on the matter. Also, subject to Government approval, I intend to introduce new safeguards in the legislation that will ensure that the situation which arose in the Younis case will be prevented in future in a manner which does not undermine legal principles and ensures that an employer cannot benefit from the fact that a contract of employment is illegal and therefore not legally binding.

Another key feature of the new Bill, subject to Government approval, will be the establishment on a statutory footing of an Employment Permit for dealing with 3rd country nationals who have, to use a parlance, “fallen out of” the Employment Permits regime. I recognise that there can be situations where such a 3rd country national can find themselves falling out of the Employment Permits’ regime through circumstances beyond their control or even as a result of their omission to keep their Employment Permit up to date. Such people may have established roots in Ireland and it can be in the public interest to facilitate a reactivation of their inclusion within a legal employment framework through the granting of an Employment Permit.

There will be three overriding principles concerning an application for an Employment Permit of this type. Firstly, the application process and administration must be clear and approachable from the perspective of an applicant. Secondly, the employee concerned must have originally entered the labour market legally through the Employment Permits system. I do not want to create a mechanism capable of abuse or considered as an alternative to the normal Employment Permit process. Also, it is logical that an Employment Permits Bill deals only with Employment Permits matters. The third principle will be that the employee must not currently be in employment illegally – it would be nonsensical for an applicant to apply for a permit under one section of the Act whilst at the same time potentially committing an offence under another section of the Act.

I should also point out that it continues to be the case that an employer can be prosecuted for breaches of employment law including the Employment Permits Acts and it is the National Employment Rights Authority’s policy to pursue such breaches.

Finally, in terms of the current status of the Employment Permits Bill, the drafting process is almost concluded. I am expecting a further draft of the Bill this week and subject to it fully meeting policy objectives I envisage submitting it to Government for approval at the earliest opportunity.

Job Creation Numbers

Questions (156)

Bernard Durkan

Question:

156. Deputy Bernard J. Durkan asked the Minister for Jobs, Enterprise and Innovation the total number of jobs created and jobs lost in County Kildare in each of the past three years to date; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [33663/13]

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Written answers (Question to Jobs)

The Forfás Annual Employment Survey reports on job gains and losses in companies that are supported by the enterprise development agencies. Details of the number of new jobs created and lost in IDA Ireland and Enterprise Ireland client companies in County Kildare in each year from 2010 to 2012 are set out in the following tabular statement. The jobs gained and lost in Kildare County Enterprise Board assisted companies for the years 2010, 2011 and 2012 are also outlined in the following tabular statement.

Supporting new and existing indigenous and foreign-owned businesses, is central to our plans for recovery, growth and jobs. When the first in a series of annual Action Plans for Jobs was launched in 2012, I said that the transformation needed for our economy would come through deliberate and determined action across all areas of Government and the private sector. This year’s Action Plan for Jobs 2013 continues that process. It includes 333 actions for delivery across all Government Departments and 46 Agencies or Offices. The Enterprise Development agencies and the County and City Enterprise Boards are at the forefront of implementing the Action Plan for Jobs and continue to ensure that enterprises can maximise their contribution to economic recovery and jobs growth.

Enterprise Ireland’s mission is to partner with entrepreneurs, businesses, and the research and investment communities to develop Ireland’s international trade, innovation, leadership, and competitiveness. The ultimate objective is increased employment and prosperity in Ireland. IDA Ireland continues to work with its existing client base in County Kildare to expand their presence and to progress the development of a knowledge economy in order that the County can compete both nationally and internationally for foreign direct investment. The Kildare County Enterprise Board is working to develop indigenous potential and stimulate economic activity at a local level primarily through the provision of financial and technical support for the development of small and micro-enterprises.

Full-Time job gains and losses in Enterprise Ireland client companies in County Kildare

Year

2010

2011

2012

Job Gains

295

1082

534

Job Losses

543

372

244

Full-Time job gains and losses in IDA Ireland client companies in County Kildare

Year

2010

2011

2012

Job Gains

1,228

398

176

Job Losses

418

507

489

Job gained and Job losses in Kildare County Enterprise Board assisted companies

Year

2010

2011

2012

Job Gained WTE*

223

173.5

171.5

Job Losses WTE*

167

252

214

*Whole Time Equivalent (WTE)

Social Insurance Issues

Questions (157, 158, 159, 160)

Stephen Donnelly

Question:

157. Deputy Stephen S. Donnelly asked the Minister for Social Protection the total amount of revenue that will be raised by the Exchequer through pay-related social insurance for the year 2013 and 2014 if there were no changes to its current rates; if she will provide a tabular breakdown of the revenue by class of worker; and if she will make a statement on the matter. [33851/13]

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Stephen Donnelly

Question:

158. Deputy Stephen S. Donnelly asked the Minister for Social Protection if she will provide a tabular breakdown of the revenue generated by pay-related social insurance for income brackets of €5,000 beginning with the €0 to €5,000 bracket for 2013 and the expected revenue for 2014 if there were no changes to the current rates; and if she will make a statement on the matter. [33852/13]

View answer

Stephen Donnelly

Question:

159. Deputy Stephen S. Donnelly asked the Minister for Social Protection if she will provide a tabular breakdown of the revenue generated by pay-related social insurance by age group in brackets of 5 years beginning with 15 to 20 year olds for 2013 and the expected revenue for 2014 if there were no changes made to the current rates; and if she will make a statement on the matter. [33853/13]

View answer

Stephen Donnelly

Question:

160. Deputy Stephen S. Donnelly asked the Minister for Social Protection if she will provide a breakdown of revenue generated by pay-related social insurance by gender for 2013 and the expected revenue for 2014 if there were no changes to the current rates; and if she will make a statement on the matter. [33854/13]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Social)

I propose to take Questions Nos. 157 to 160, inclusive, together.

The Revised estimate for SIF income for 2013 is €7.1 billion and the estimate for 2014 is €7.5 billion. The estimate for 2014 is subject to review pending receipt of details of actual receipts for 2013. The additional breakdown of information requested by the Deputy is not available. The Deputy may wish to consult “Statistical Information on Social Welfare Services 2011” which contains a range of statistical information and sets out comprehensive data relating to services provided by the Department.