Unemployment Data

Questions (125)

Bernard Durkan

Question:

125. Deputy Bernard J. Durkan asked the Taoiseach if he will provide a breakdown of the numbers of long-term unemployed by gender; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [24747/14]

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Written answers (Question to Taoiseach)

The Quarterly National Household Survey (QNHS) is the official source of estimates of unemployment in the State.

The table shows the number of persons aged 15 years and over classified by gender and duration of unemployment (ILO) and the long-term unemployment rate in each quarter from Quarter 1 2013 to Quarter 1 2014.

Long-term unemployment is defined as the number of persons unemployed for 1 year and over.

Persons aged 15 years and over classified by gender and duration of unemployment (ILO)

'000

-

Q1 13

Q2 13

Q3 13

Q4 13

Q1 14

Males

-

-

-

-

-

Less than 1 year

59.0

63.9

60.0

48.6

53.3

1 year and over

126.2

123.3

115.9

108.7

107.6

Not stated

*

*

*

*

*

Total

186.9

189.6

179.0

158.9

163.5

Females

-

-

-

-

-

Less than 1 year

49.8

57.9

53.6

46.6

45

1 year and over

54.4

51.8

49.2

46.8

48.5

Not stated

*

*

*

*

*

Total

105.1

111.2

103.8

94.3

94.6

All Persons

-

-

-

-

-

Less than 1 year

108.8

121.8

113.7

95.2

98.3

1 year and over

180.5

175*.0

165.1

155.5

156.2

Not stated

*

[3.9]

[4.1]

[3.6]

Total

292.0

300.7

282.9

253.2

258.1

Long-term unemployment rate %

-

-

-

-

-

Males

10.7

10.3

9.6

9.1

9.1

Females

5.7

5.3

5.0

4.8

5.1

All Persons

8.4

8.1

7.6

7.2

7.3

Data may be subject to future revision.

Data may be subject to sampling or other survey errors, which are greater in respect of smaller values or estimates of change.

* Estimates are too small to be considered reliable.

Parentheses [ ] indicate where estimates are considered to have a wider margin of error and should be treated with caution.

Source: Quarterly National Household Survey, Central Statistics Office.

Unemployment Data

Questions (126)

Bernard Durkan

Question:

126. Deputy Bernard J. Durkan asked the Taoiseach the extent to which the numbers on the live register have fluctuated on an annual basis over the past six years to date; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [24749/14]

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Written answers (Question to Taoiseach)

The Live Register series gives a monthly breakdown of the number of people claiming Jobseeker's Benefit, Jobseeker's Allowance and other registrants as registered with the Department of Social Protection. The table contains the annual average number of persons on the Live Register for each year from 2008 to 2013.

It should be noted that the Live Register is not a definitive measure of unemployment as it includes part-time workers, and seasonal and casual workers entitled to Jobseeker's Benefit or Allowance.

Annual average number of persons on the Live Register, 2008-2013

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

Total

226,735

398,159

441,689

444,905

436,254

418,950

Source: CSO Live Register

EU Meetings

Questions (127, 128, 134, 135)

Micheál Martin

Question:

127. Deputy Micheál Martin asked the Taoiseach the issues that were discussed at the May EU Council meeting; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [23612/14]

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Micheál Martin

Question:

128. Deputy Micheál Martin asked the Taoiseach if he had any bilaterals when he was in Brussels on 27 May; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [23613/14]

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Micheál Martin

Question:

134. Deputy Micheál Martin asked the Taoiseach the discussions he has had at the May EU Council meeting regarding the EU digital economy; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [24097/14]

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Micheál Martin

Question:

135. Deputy Micheál Martin asked the Taoiseach the specific areas on unemployment that were discussed at the May EU Council meeting; the actions to be taken; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [24098/14]

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Written answers (Question to Taoiseach)

I propose to take Questions Nos. 127, 128, 134 and 135 together.

I attended the Informal meeting of Heads of State or Government in Brussels on 27 May. We discussed the results of the European Parliament elections, and the process for the election of the new President of the European Commission. In that regard, and in line with the procedures set out in the Treaty on European Union, Heads of State or Government tasked President Van Rompuy to consult with the presidents of the new political groups, and to report back to the European Council.

We also had an initial discussion on the Union's future priorities and strategic agenda for the period ahead. There was general agreement that we must maintain the focus on growth and jobs.

We must also continue the work on strengthening the Economic and Monetary Union while respecting and preserving the unity of the wider EU. The need for a strong, united response to climate change, and to reduce the EU's energy dependency, was highlighted. Leaders also welcomed the successful Presidential election in Ukraine. Finally, we also discussed the recent flooding in the Balkans. While I did not have any separate bilateral meetings, I did of course see all of my colleagues at the meeting.

EU Issues

Questions (129, 130, 137)

Micheál Martin

Question:

129. Deputy Micheál Martin asked the Taoiseach if he has been approached by other EU leaders regarding the appointment of EU Commissioners; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [23614/14]

View answer

Micheál Martin

Question:

130. Deputy Micheál Martin asked the Taoiseach if he has been approached by other EU leaders in relation to the selection of the new EU Commission President position; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [23615/14]

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Micheál Martin

Question:

137. Deputy Micheál Martin asked the Taoiseach if Chancellor Merkel has asked him to support the appointment of Mr. Junker as European Commission President; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [24343/14]

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Written answers (Question to Taoiseach)

I propose to take Questions Nos. 129, 130 and 137 together.

Article 17.7 of the Treaty on European Union provides that, taking into account the elections to the European Parliament and after having held the appropriate consultations, the European Council, acting by a qualified majority, shall propose a candidate for President of the Commission to the European Parliament. Declaration 11 on Article 17 (6) and (7) further provides that the European Parliament and the European Council are jointly responsible for the smooth running of the process leading to the election of the President of the European Commission and that, prior to the decision of the European Council, representatives of the European Parliament and of the European Council will conduct the necessary consultations in the framework deemed the most appropriate.

This process is now underway. On 27 May, I attended an Informal dinner of Heads of State or Government for an initial discussion on the results of the European Parliament elections.

We took note of the letter from the Conference of Presidents of the European Parliament inviting the Council to start consultations in conformity with Declaration 11 and gave a mandate to President Van Rompuy to conduct consultations on behalf of the European Council with the Presidents of the newly constituted political groups in the European Parliament. President Van Rompuy will also have bilateral talks with members of the European Council. I expect that President Van Rompuy will report back on these discussions to the European Council meeting on 26 June. Before and after the 27 May meeting, the topic has of course featured in my discussions with my European Council counterparts.

Turning to the process of appointment for members of the European Commission, Article 17.7 of the Treaty on European Union provides that the Council, by common accord with the President-elect of the Commission, shall adopt the list of the other persons proposed for appointment as members of the Commission, on the basis of the suggestions made by Member States. I expect that the appointment process for the other 27 members of the European Commission will begin swiftly once a President-elect of the European Commission is in place.

Youth Unemployment Data

Questions (131)

Willie O'Dea

Question:

131. Deputy Willie O'Dea asked the Taoiseach the current number and percentage of young persons under 26 years who are not in education, employment or training here; and if she will provide an update on the matter. [23842/14]

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Written answers (Question to Taoiseach)

The Quarterly National Household Survey (QNHS) is the official source of estimates of employment and unemployment in the State and the data also provides information on persons Neither in Employment nor in Education and Training (NEET).

The Q1 2014 estimates are the most recent QNHS figures available.

The table shows the number of persons aged 16-25 who are classified as being Neither in Employment nor in Education and Training (NEET) together with the proportion of persons aged 16-25 this represents.

Persons aged 16 - 25 Neither in Employment nor in Education and Training (NEET) Quarter 1 2014

Q1 14 Thou

% of 16-25 year population

Neither in Employment nor in Education and Training (NEET)

87.4

16.7

Source: Quarterly National Household Survey (QNHS), Central Statistics Office, Ireland.

Data may be subject to future revision.

Reference period: q1=Jan-Mar,

Note: The indicator on people Neither in Employment nor in Education and Training (NEET) corresponds to the population of the age group who is not employed and not involved in further education or training, i.e. persons who meet the following two conditions: (a) they are not employed (i.e. unemployed or inactive according to the International Labour Organisation definition) and (b) they have not received any education or training in the four weeks preceding the survey

When calculating the proportion of all persons in the age group classified as NEET, it should be noted that respondents who have not answered the question 'participation in regular (formal) education and training' are excluded from the calculation.

Semi-State Bodies

Questions (132)

Michael McGrath

Question:

132. Deputy Michael McGrath asked the Taoiseach the current credit rating of all commercial semi-States operating under the aegis of his Department; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [24094/14]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Taoiseach)

There are no semi State companies under the remit of my Department.

Cabinet Committee Meetings

Questions Nos. 134 and 135 answered with Question No. 127.

Questions (133)

Micheál Martin

Question:

133. Deputy Micheál Martin asked the Taoiseach the number and type of Cabinet sub-committees he attended in May. [24096/14]

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Written answers (Question to Taoiseach)

In May I chaired four Cabinet Committee meetings. The Committees on Justice Reform, and Mortgage Arrears and Credit Availability, each met once and the Committee on Health met twice. I also chaired a meeting of the Economic Management Council.

Questions Nos. 134 and 135 answered with Question No. 127.

Legislative Measures

Question No. 137 answered with Question No. 129.

Questions (136)

Seán Fleming

Question:

136. Deputy Sean Fleming asked the Taoiseach the legislative provisions in respect of his Department that has been passed by the Oireachtas since 2011 but have not come into effect to date; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [24156/14]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Taoiseach)

I presume the Deputy is referring to Bills sponsored by my Department. My Department has not sponsored any Bills enacted through the Oireachtas since 2011.

Question No. 137 answered with Question No. 129.

European Parliament Elections

Questions (138)

Micheál Martin

Question:

138. Deputy Micheál Martin asked the Taoiseach the position regarding the recent European Parliament elections; his views on the anti-EU sentiment across the EU; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [24344/14]

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Written answers (Question to Taoiseach)

The recent European Parliament elections confirmed the extent of European citizens’ concern over the continuing effects of the economic crisis across the European Union and the uneven pace of economic recovery. While increased support for eurosceptic parties and, more worryingly, parties with extreme views on some issues, is a cause of considerable concern, support varies greatly across Member States and should not be overstated. A sizeable majority of voters registered their support for pro-EU parties, thus ensuring that they will continue to represent the largest political groups in the new European Parliament.

On 27 May, I joined other EU Heads of State and Government in Brussels to discuss the outcome of the elections and the significance of the results for the way the EU functions and how it is perceived. It is clear that citizens have sent some strong messages which must be heeded. I stressed that our immediate focus must be on addressing the concerns raised by Europe’s citizens and that this will best be achieved by prioritising measures to speed up economic recovery and spur job creation across the EU, including through the completion of Banking Union, deepening of the single market, and the agreement of free trade agreements with external partners.

At the meeting, Heads of State and Government agreed on the need to set a positive and future-oriented agenda for growth, competitiveness and jobs while accelerating the recovery, as part of our collective response to the elections. Leaders also set some broad orientations on priorities and the strategic agenda for the years ahead, which will be the focus of further discussion at the June European Council.