Exports Data

Questions (105)

Billy Kelleher

Question:

105. Deputy Billy Kelleher asked the Taoiseach the number of SMEs that account for total exports of goods and services on a percentage basis by each country in 2017 and 2018; and the number of persons employed in such SMEs in tabular form. [12766/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Taoiseach)

The exact data requested by the Deputy is not available. Table A shows the data on exports of goods classified by enterprise size class for 2016.

Table A : Goods exports by enterprise size 2016

Enterprise size

Value €million

% of total

Number of enterprises

% of total

Micro

6,917

6

5,007

59

Small

7,507

6

2,143

25

Medium

22,020

19

750

9

SMEs

36,443

31

7,900

92

Large

79,526

67

263

3

Unknown

2,261

2

382

4

Total

118,230

100

8,545

100

Micro (0-9 employees), Small (10-49 employees), Medium (50-249 employees), Large (over 250 employees).

Table B shows the number of enterprises, employees and persons engaged classified by enterprise size class, in 2016. Persons engaged include employees, proprietors and family members.

Table B : Persons employed in SMEs 2016

Enterprise Size Class (employees)

Enterprises

% of Total

Employees

% of Total

Persons Engaged

% of Total

Under 10

229,534

91.8%

252,709

18.9%

392,829

26.6%

10-49

16,914

6.8%

324,539

24.3%

327,572

22.2%

50-249

3,003

1.2%

290,275

21.7%

290,604

19.7%

SMEs

249,451

99.8%

867,523

64.9%

1,011,005

68.5%

250+

582

0.2%

466,774

35.0%

467,231

31.6%

Total

250,033

100.0%

1,334,927

100.0%

1,478,236

100.0%

Source: CSO Business Demography Statistics, 2016

Citizens Assembly

Questions (106)

Richard Boyd Barrett

Question:

106. Deputy Richard Boyd Barrett asked the Taoiseach if he will report on his plans for the Citizens' Assembly. [11965/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Taoiseach)

I have proposed that a Citizens' Assembly be established to consider the issues of gender equality and directly elected mayor for Dublin and the form that this should take.

The function of a Citizens’ Assembly is to inform the public and increase overall awareness and comprehension of topics being examined. Consideration is being given to the parameters of these topics and how best to optimise the use of an Assembly’s time and the taxpayers money.

Work is underway in my Department to bring forward proposals for the establishment of a new Citizens’ Assembly and I expect this to come before Government shortly.

Brexit Issues

Questions (107)

Micheál Martin

Question:

107. Deputy Micheál Martin asked the Taoiseach if he has spoken to Prime Minister May since the beginning of March 2019; and if so, the issues that were discussed. [13889/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Taoiseach)

I had a bilateral meeting with Prime Minister May on the margins of the European Council on 21 March where we discussed the current state of play with Brexit and the Prime Minister outlined the approach she planned to take at the European Council meeting.

Prime Minister May explained that she was seeking an extension of the Article 50 deadline until 30 June, which she hoped would provide sufficient time for her to secure agreement and to complete the legislative arrangements needed to implement it in the UK.

I reiterated our wish to see the Withdrawal Agreement ratified, so that negotiations on a close, comprehensive and ambitious future relationship between the EU and the UK can start as soon as possible. I also made clear that we are sympathetic to the case for an extension.

The House will be aware that, in the end, the European Council agreed to an extension until 22 May if the Withdrawal Agreement is approved by the House of Commons this week. Absent that approval, an extension to 12 April was agreed, by which date the UK would be expected to bring forward alternative proposals.

I continue to believe that approval of the Withdrawal Agreement is the best way forward in order to protect the Good Friday Agreement and to avoid a hard border. I was pleased to have the continued backing of my fellow counterparts.

Undocumented Irish in the USA

Questions (108)

Micheál Martin

Question:

108. Deputy Micheál Martin asked the Taoiseach if he discussed the undocumented Irish when attending meetings in the United States of America. [13890/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Taoiseach)

On my recent visit to the United States, I had a series of political meetings, including with President Trump, Vice President Pence, Speaker Pelosi, Senate Minority Leader Schumer, and Senator Patrick Leahy.

In all these meetings, I expressed the Irish Government’s thanks for their support of the E3 Bill last year, and sought continued support as the Bill is reintroduced in the House in the coming weeks.

I also stressed to the US Administration and Congressional leaders the importance of resolving the situation for the small undocumented Irish community in the US.

In Chicago, I met with a number of emigrant support groups that receive Irish Government funding, and had the opportunity to reaffirm the Government’s commitment to finding a resolution to the status of the undocumented.

European Council Meetings

Questions (109, 110)

Micheál Martin

Question:

109. Deputy Micheál Martin asked the Taoiseach if Hungary was discussed at the March 2019 EU Council meeting. [13891/19]

View answer

Michael Moynihan

Question:

110. Deputy Michael Moynihan asked the Taoiseach if the proposals on EU reform by the President of France, Mr. Emmanuel Macron, were discussed at the EU Council meeting in March 2019. [13897/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Taoiseach)

I propose to take Questions Nos. 109 and 110 together.

I attended a meeting of the European Council in Brussels on Thursday 21 and Friday 22 March 2019.

The agenda for our discussions included Brexit; jobs, growth and competitiveness; relations with China ahead of the EU-China Summit on 9 April; climate change; and efforts to combat disinformation.

We also met with the leaders of Iceland, Norway and Liechtenstein and marked the 25th anniversary of the European Economic Area.

Our discussions did not include Hungary nor proposals on EU reform.

Departmental Consultations

Questions (111)

Richard Boyd Barrett

Question:

111. Deputy Richard Boyd Barrett asked the Taoiseach the public consultations planned in his Department over the coming months. [11967/19]

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Written answers (Question to Taoiseach)

There is only one public consultation currently planned by my Department in 2019. This relates to the Government’s annual National Risk Assessment.

Given that my Department is largely concerned with coordination across Departments, it doesn’t generally hold a significant number of public consultations on specific policy issues. However, while no other public consultations are currently planned in 2019, it is of course possible that this may change during the course of the year.

In terms of the public consultation planned as part of the annual National Risk Assessment, it is intended to launch it in quarter two to help inform development of the annual National Risk Assessment Report, which is generally published by July.

The National Risk Assessment is an annual exercise which aims to ensure a broad-based and inclusive debate on the strategic risks facing the country. One of the lessons of the recent crisis is that Government didn’t pay enough attention to dissenting opinions and the National Risk Assessment provides an opportunity for an open and inclusive conversation on risks.

This will be the sixth year the Government has produced the National Risk Assessment, and it has highlighted important issues since first published in 2014, including one of the earliest official acknowledgments of the risks arising from a potential Brexit.

The development of the 2019 National Risk Assessment is at an early stage. In addition to cross-Departmental consultation, and public consultation, my Department plans to hold an Open Policy Seminar in Quarter 2, and all of these elements will inform the final Report, which as I mentioned, is generally published by July.

Northern Ireland

Questions (112, 117, 120, 121)

Micheál Martin

Question:

112. Deputy Micheál Martin asked the Taoiseach if he has met with Ms Arlene Foster and Ms Michelle O'Neill recently. [14285/19]

View answer

Michael Moynihan

Question:

117. Deputy Michael Moynihan asked the Taoiseach if he will report on his address to the Alliance Party in Northern Ireland on 2 March 2019. [11937/19]

View answer

Micheál Martin

Question:

120. Deputy Micheál Martin asked the Taoiseach if he will report on his visit to Belfast recently; if he met groups; and if he will report on his address to the Alliance Party conference. [11929/19]

View answer

Micheál Martin

Question:

121. Deputy Micheál Martin asked the Taoiseach if he will report on his visit and address to the Alliance Party conference in Belfast on 1 March 2019. [11927/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Taoiseach)

I propose to take Questions Nos. 112, 117, 120 and 121 together.

I travelled to Belfast on Friday 1 March to deliver the keynote speech at the Alliance Party Annual Conference dinner, a copy of which is available on the Government website - www.merrionstreet.ie. During the course of my speech I emphasised my Government's commitment to being fair and impartial in working with all parties in Northern Ireland and particularly with individuals, groups, and parties in civic nationalism and civic unionism.

I met with Alliance Party leader Naomi Long and other senior party members during the evening when we discussed a wide range of topics including the political situation and citizens rights in Northern Ireland and Brexit.

Prior to the Alliance Party dinner, I had the opportunity to meet with representatives from Northern Ireland business organisations to hear their views and concerns on the latest Brexit developments and the ongoing political impasse in Northern Ireland. We discussed the importance of the All Island economy, challenges that businesses in Northern Ireland are facing and Brexit contingency planning being undertaken by the Irish Government.

I met with DUP Leader Arlene Foster while in the United States for St. Patrick’s Day when we discussed the situation on Brexit as it stood at the time, including prospects for ratification by the UK of the Withdrawal Agreement. We also discussed political developments in Northern Ireland, including the importance of restoration of the institutions under the Good Friday Agreement. I also spoke with Ms Foster at events we were both attending.

Previously, I met Arlene Foster and Sinn Féin Vice President Michelle O'Neill when I travelled to Belfast on Friday 8th February for a series of meetings with each of the five main political parties in Northern Ireland. I also met UUP leader Robin Swann; Alliance Party Leader Naomi Long and Colum Eastwood, leader of the SDLP that day.

These meetings provided an opportunity to engage with the Northern Ireland political parties and to hear their views on latest Brexit developments and on the current political situation in Northern Ireland. We discussed what could be done to get the institutions in Northern Ireland up and running again. Once again, I emphasised the Government’s full commitment to all aspects of the Good Friday Agreement, and our continuing determination to secure the effective operation of all of its institutions.

The Government wants to see an agreement in place to secure the operation of the devolved institutions and we will continue to engage with the British Government and the political parties in Northern Ireland to seek to progress that in the period immediately ahead.

On Brexit, I outlined to each of the NI parties the Government's position, shared by the EU, that the Withdrawal Agreement is not open for renegotiation and represents the best way to secure an orderly Brexit while avoiding a return to a hard border.

National Minimum Wage

Questions (113)

Billy Kelleher

Question:

113. Deputy Billy Kelleher asked the Taoiseach the number of persons on a wage at or below the minimum wage level by gender and age. [12757/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Taoiseach)

The Labour Force Survey (LFS) is the official source of estimates of employment (ILO) in the State. This survey replaced the Quarterly National Household Survey (QNHS) from Q3 2017.

The most recent figures available are for Q4 2018 when the number of employees aged 15 years and over reporting earning the National Minimum Wage or less in the State was 137,200.

Table 1 and 2 below show the total number of employees (ILO) aged 15 years and over classified by National Minimum Wage (NMW) earnings status, gender and age group in Q4 2018.

Table 1 Employees aged 15 years and over classified by gender and National Minimum Wage (NMW) earnings status

'000

Gender

National Minimum Wage earnings status

Q4 18

Male

Employees reporting earning National Minimum Wage or less

61.3

Employees reporting earning more than National Minimum Wage

846.4

Not stated

74.1

Total

981.8

Female

Employees reporting earning National Minimum Wage or less

75.9

Employees reporting earning more than National Minimum Wage

833.2

Not stated

59.3

Total

968.4

All employees

Employees reporting earning National Minimum Wage or less

137.2

Employees reporting earning more than National Minimum Wage

1,679.6

Not stated

133.3

Total

1,950.1

Source: Labour Force Survey (LFS), Central Statistics Office, Ireland

Data may be subject to future revision.

Data may be subject to sampling or other survey errors, which are greater in respect of smaller values or estimates of change.

Reference period: Q4=Oct-Dec.

Table 2 Employees (ILO) aged 15 years and over classified by age group and National Minimum Wage (NMW) earnings status

Age group

National Minimum Wage earnings status

Q4 18

15-19 years

Employees reporting earning National Minimum Wage or less

30.5

Employees reporting earning more than National Minimum Wage

19.7

Not stated

7.7

Total

57.8

20-24 years

Employees reporting earning National Minimum Wage or less

38.2

Employees reporting earning more than National Minimum Wage

125.8

Not stated

20.7

Total

184.7

25-34 years

Employees reporting earning National Minimum Wage or less

28.3

Employees reporting earning more than National Minimum Wage

409.9

Not stated

33.8

Total

472.0

35-44 years

Employees reporting earning National Minimum Wage or less

18.7

Employees reporting earning more than National Minimum Wage

500.9

Not stated

29.4

Total

549.1

45-54 years

Employees reporting earning National Minimum Wage or less

10.9

Employees reporting earning more than National Minimum Wage

373.8

Not stated

25.0

Total

409.7

55-59 years

Employees reporting earning National Minimum Wage or less

[5.5]

Employees reporting earning more than National Minimum Wage

139.5

Not stated

8.6

Total

153.6

60-64 years

Employees reporting earning National Minimum Wage or less

*

Employees reporting earning more than National Minimum Wage

84.6

Not stated

6.1

Total

93.6

65+ years

Employees reporting earning National Minimum Wage or less

*

Employees reporting earning more than National Minimum Wage

25.3

Not stated

*

Total

29.6

All employees

Employees reporting earning National Minimum Wage or less

137.2

Employees reporting earning more than National Minimum Wage

1,679.6

Not stated

133.3

Total

1,950.1

Source: Labour Force Survey (LFS), Central Statistics Office, Ireland

* Estimates for numbers of persons or averages where there are less than 30 persons in a cell are not produced as estimates are too small to be considered reliable.

Parentheses [ ] indicate where there are 30-49 persons in a cell, estimates are considered to have a wider margin of error and should be treated with caution.

Data may be subject to future revision.

Data may be subject to sampling or other survey errors, which are greater in respect of smaller values or estimates of change.

Reference period: Q4=Oct-Dec.

Legal Costs

Questions (114)

Mattie McGrath

Question:

114. Deputy Mattie McGrath asked the Taoiseach the solicitors and barristers that received payments from the Office of the Chief State Solicitor and the Office of the Attorney General during 2018 and to date in 2019; the amount each person received for their services; and the amounts owing for services in 2018 and to date. [13301/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Taoiseach)

The amounts paid to barristers and solicitors engaged by the Office of the Chief State Solicitor and the Office of the Attorney General during 2018 and to date in 2019 are set out hereunder:

2018 2019 (to date)

Barristers €13,996,357.66 €3,501,783.41

Solicitors €220,436.02 €8,192.34

In 2018 the Offices engaged the services of 32 solicitors and 302 barristers. In 2019, 9 solicitors and 204 barristers were engaged by the Offices.

I am advised by the Office of the Attorney General that they are currently examining the issue of whether details of individuals can be disclosed in the context of GDPR.

It is not possible to accurately determine the amounts owing to barristers for services provided in 2018 and 2019 but not yet paid. The Offices operate a robust system to determine the appropriate counsel fee level on a case-by-case basis. Following nomination by the Attorney General, counsel undertake the legal work and submit a fee note. The Offices evaluate each fee note to decide what level of fee is appropriate for the work performed, taking into account a variety of factors including, inter alia, case complexity, amount of work done by counsel, and performance of counsel. Hence the final fee to be paid is not determined until the end of the process.

There are no fees owing to solicitors at the present time.

Interdepartmental Working Groups

Questions (115)

Mattie McGrath

Question:

115. Deputy Mattie McGrath asked the Taoiseach the working groups currently established in his Department; the focus of their work; and the membership composition of each. [13573/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Taoiseach)

In answering this question, I am interpreting "working groups" as groups which are working towards completion of particular projects or tasks rather than groups which meet on an ongoing basis to provide strategic oversight on cross-cutting Government issues underpinning the work of the Cabinet Committees, including Brexit. Accordingly, the information sought by the Deputy is detailed in the table below.

Name of Working Group:

Focus of the work of the Group:

Membership:

1

Marine Legislation Steering Group

To ensure a coordinated approach to the development of the Maritime Area Foreshore Amendment Bill.

Representatives from relevant Government Departments including the Office of the Attorney General.

2

National Risk Assessment Steering Group

To discuss and consider relevant national strategic risks for Ireland and contribute to the development of the National Risk Assessment Report.

Representatives from relevant Government Departments and Agencies.

3

Implementation Group on Policing Reform (IGPR)

Responsible for delivery of ‘A Policing Service for the Future’ – the Plan to implement the Report of the Commission on the Future of Policing in Ireland.

Independent Chair with representatives from relevant Government Departments and An Garda Síochána.

4

Sub Group of the Implementation Group on Policing Reform (IGPR) on Multi-Disciplinary Approaches

To progress actions in “A Policing Service for the Future” that relate to multi-disciplinary approaches.

Representatives from relevant Government Departments and Agencies.

5

High Level Steering Board (HLSB)

To support and guide the work of the Implementation Group on Policing Reform (IGPR) in the implementation of "A Policing Service for the Future".

Representatives from relevant Government Departments, An Garda Síochána and Chair of the Implementation Group on Policing Reform.

6

North East Inner City (NEIC) Oversight Group

To oversee the implementation of the Mulvey Report on Dublin’s North East Inner City and support the work of the independent chair of the NEIC Programme Implementation Board.

Representatives from relevant Government Departments and Agencies including Chair of the Programme Implementation Board.

7

Digital Strategy Interdepartmental Group

To assist in the development of a new National Digital Strategy and ensure a comprehensive whole-of-Government approach.

Representatives from all Government Departments.

8

Innovation District Advisory Group

To develop and agree a vision and roadmap for the establishment of the Grand Canal Innovation District

Representatives from relevant Government Departments, Agencies, 3rd level Educational Institutions, Industry, NGOs and Community Development Organisations.

Departmental Correspondence

Question No. 117 answered with Question No. 112.

Questions (116)

Mattie McGrath

Question:

116. Deputy Mattie McGrath asked the Taoiseach the number of complaints submitted to his Department in 2017, 2018 and to date in 2019; the number of appeals made with respect to the outcome of such complaints; and the number referred to the Office of the Ombudsman. [13788/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Taoiseach)

My Department received five customer complaints in 2017 and four customer complaints in 2018. No complaints have been received in 2019 to date. No appeals were received in respect of complaints and no cases were referred to the Office of the Ombudsman during this time.

Question No. 117 answered with Question No. 112.

Cabinet Committee Meetings

Questions (118)

Michael Moynihan

Question:

118. Deputy Michael Moynihan asked the Taoiseach if Cabinet committee A, economy, has met recently. [11936/19]

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Written answers (Question to Taoiseach)

Cabinet Committee A covers issues relating to the Economy, Jobs including Future Jobs Ireland, the Labour Market, Competitiveness, Productivity, Trade, and the Action Plan on Rural Development, the Digital Economy and Pensions. These issues are also regularly discussed at full Government meetings. The Cabinet Committee last met on the 12th November.

In recent months Cabinet Committee A and its associated Senior Officials Group has prioritised the preparation of Future Jobs Ireland, the Government's new economic plan to ensure we are well placed to meet future challenges facing the Irish economy. It is aimed at driving innovation; enhancing productivity; increasing labour market participation; skills and talent development; and the low carbon economy, and was launched on 10th March.

Future Jobs Ireland will position Ireland as a leading pioneer in technology adoption by investing, for example, in demonstrator sites such as in Cobotics, Augmented/Virtual reality (AR/VR), energy systems, and advanced materials. The Government also recognises that in a rapidly changing world there are people that risk getting left behind. Therefore, Future Jobs Ireland will develop Transition Teams to assist workers and sectors most challenged by our changing economy.

Along with this focus on embracing technological change, Future Jobs Ireland includes ambitious targets for each pillar to be achieved by 2025 including doubling our lifelong learning rate to 18%.

The Cabinet Committee and its Senior Officials Group will now oversee implementation of Future Jobs Ireland 2019.

Cabinet Committee Meetings

Questions Nos. 120 and 121 answered with Question No. 112.

Questions (119)

Michael Moynihan

Question:

119. Deputy Michael Moynihan asked the Taoiseach if Cabinet committee F, national security, has met recently. [11935/19]

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Written answers (Question to Taoiseach)

The Committee last met on 8 February 2018. The meeting was attended by Ministers and Senior Officials from the Departments of Finance; Public Expenditure and Reform; Foreign Affairs and Trade; Justice and Equality; Health; Communications, Climate Action and Environment; Transport, Tourism and Sport; Housing, Planning and Local Government; and Defence.

Arrangements are being made for the next meeting of Cabinet Committee F next week.

The role of Cabinet Committee F is "to keep the State's systems for the analysis of, preparation for, and response to, threats to national security under review and to provide high-level coordination between relevant Departments and agencies on related matters".

In December 2018, Government published ‘A Policing Service for the Future’, the implementation plan of the Report on the Commission on the Future of Policing. This is an ambitious but realistic 4 year plan set out across four key phases, which will deliver a modern, highly professional, human rights based police service. Cabinet Committee G provides political oversight of this programme of reform.

Questions Nos. 120 and 121 answered with Question No. 112.

Taoiseach's Meetings and Engagements

Questions (122)

Micheál Martin

Question:

122. Deputy Micheál Martin asked the Taoiseach if he will report on the meeting he hosted with the Prime Minister of Lithuania, Mr. Saulius Skvernelis; the areas they visited; and the issues that were discussed. [11926/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Taoiseach)

I welcomed Lithuanian Prime Minister Saulius Skvernelis to Dublin on 4 March. I joined him in a visit to Hartstown Community School, which I understand has the largest percentage of students from Lithuania in the country.

We then had a bilateral meeting over lunch at which we discussed the excellent bilateral relations between Ireland and Lithuania; areas for further cooperation between us; and a range of other issues on the EU agenda.

I thanked the Prime Minister for Lithuania’s steadfast support for Ireland in the Brexit negotiations.

Citizens Assembly

Questions (123)

Mattie McGrath

Question:

123. Deputy Mattie McGrath asked the Taoiseach the costs incurred by the Citizens' Assembly from 2016 to 2018 and to date in 2019; and the remuneration level of paid members. [14162/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Taoiseach)

Year

Costs Incurred

2016

€ 274,321

2017

€1,535,133

2018

€533,607

2019

€12,496

Members were reimbursed for expenses incurred in attending meetings, including travel costs and a contribution towards childcare. Payment was not made for attendance or any missed days of work either to members or their employees.

Expenditure incurred in 2019 relates to a small number of invoices for utilities relating to the Assembly which were invoiced and paid in early 2019.

Commemorative Events

Questions (124)

Declan Breathnach

Question:

124. Deputy Declan Breathnach asked the Taoiseach and Minister for Defence his plans to mark the 90th anniversary of the establishment of the Volunteer Reserve Force the precursor to the Reserve Defence Forces; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [12936/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Defence)

A ceremonial event to commemorate the 90th anniversary of the establishment of the Reserve Defence Force will take place on Tuesday 16 April 2019 at the National Museum of Ireland, Collins Barracks, Dublin. Details of this event are being finalised by the military authorities.

This anniversary is a time to recognise the important role of the Reserve Defence Force. The Government appreciates the service of members of the Reserve Defence Force and recognises the important role that the RDF plays in contributing to Ireland's defence capability. The White Paper is clear that there is a continued requirement to retain and develop the RDF and it is currently on a development path arising from the recommendations of the White Paper.

I have been informed that all services and formations with RDF personnel will be represented at this commemorative event.

Defence Forces Recruitment

Questions (125)

Declan Breathnach

Question:

125. Deputy Declan Breathnach asked the Taoiseach and Minister for Defence if the use of competitions will be broadened for direct entry officers to include those with specialist dental, legal and other professional qualifications in order to fill such specialist vacancies within the Defence Forces as they arise; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [12938/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Defence)

Direct entry provision is utilised, for those with professional qualifications, for the recruitment of Medical Officers and Engineers. A working group, established in Q4 2018, is examining the scope for a wider application of direct entry as a method of recruitment.

Defence Forces Ombudsman Complaints

Questions (126)

Clare Daly

Question:

126. Deputy Clare Daly asked the Taoiseach and Minister for Defence the difference between a chapter 1 complaint and a chapter 2 complaint in the context of complaints lodged under administrative instruction A7. [12943/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Defence)

It is Defence Forces policy that all members have a right to be treated with respect, equality and dignity, and to carry out their duties free from any type of discrimination. Personnel are expected to support the policy, by bringing instances of inappropriate behaviour to attention at an early stage and cooperating with any investigation whether as a complainant, the person complained of or as a witness.

There are various ways to report a complaint under Administrative Instruction A7.

Chapter 1 complaints deal with interpersonal relationships. These complaints follow an informal approach, where the complainant seeks advice from a third party or Designated Contact Person (DCP) to resolve the issue as early as possible. If the complaint cannot be resolved at this stage, then the complaint is formally lodged in writing to a superior. An investigation will follow.

Chapter 2 complaints follow a more formal approach and deal with matters that fall under Section 114 of the Defence Act 1954. This procedure is used where a member of the Defence Forces thinks himself/herself wronged of any matter by another member of the Defence Forces.