Fire Service

Question No. 645 answered with Question No. 606.

Questions (644)

John Curran

Question:

644. Deputy John Curran asked the Minister for Housing, Planning and Local Government his plans to upgrade the Dublin Fire Brigade fleet in view of the age of the fleet; the number and type of vehicles in the fleet; the number less than 5, 5 to 7, 7 to 10 and more than 10 years old, respectively; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [16693/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Housing)

The provision of fire services in local authority areas, including the establishment and maintenance of fire brigades, the assessment of fire cover needs and the provision of premises, is a statutory function of the individual fire authorities under the provisions of the Fire Services Acts 1981 and 2003.

My Department supports the fire authorities through setting national policy, providing a central training programme, issuing guidance on operational and other related matters and providing capital funding, including recoupment (within the overall funding available) of costs incurred by fire authorities in relation to the approved purchase of fire appliances and emergency equipment, as well as construction and upgrading of fire stations.

Decisions regarding the number and type of fire appliances maintained is a matter for each fire authority, having regard to the assessment of their individual fire cover needs and the provision and management of a fleet adequate to their requirements. In the assessment of their fire cover needs, including the provision and management of a fleet adequate to their requirements, fire service management use evidence based on multi-annual data of actual fires in determining fire station area risk categorisation and have regard to standards set out in the national policy document “Keeping Communities Safe” for benchmarking their services.

As part of my Department's fire services capital programme, I announced a new national joint-procurement programme in 2017 to purchase 20 new fire appliances. Dublin City Council's Fire Service received an allocation for three new ‘Class B’ appliances, which is the standard appliance. In 2015, under a similar programme, Dublin's Fire Service also received an allocation for three new ‘Class B’ appliances. Dublin City Council's Fire Service requested, and received approval, to substitute the cost of one of the appliances to purchase a pre-used turntable ladder. In addition to these allocations, since 2008, my Department has also funded four ‘Class B’ appliances and one turntable ladder for Dublin.

Detailed information on the age, number and vehicle type of the Dublin Fire Brigade fleet, as requested by the Deputy, is not available in my Department. It should be available directly from the Fire Authority, in this instance Dublin City Council who, through Dublin Fire Brigade, provide fire services for all four Dublin local authorities.

Question No. 645 answered with Question No. 606.

Social and Affordable Housing Eligibility

Questions (646)

Bernard Durkan

Question:

646. Deputy Bernard J. Durkan asked the Minister for Housing, Planning and Local Government if income qualification thresholds for local authority houses are likely to be increased in view of the fact that the existing thresholds are perceived as being unrealistic; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [16700/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Housing)

Applications for social housing support are assessed by the relevant local authority, in accordance with the eligibility and need criteria set down in section 20 of the Housing (Miscellaneous Provisions) Act 2009 and the associated Social Housing Assessment Regulations 2011, as amended.

The 2011 Regulations prescribe maximum net income limits for each local authority, in different bands according to the area concerned, with income being defined and assessed according to a standard Household Means Policy.

Under the Household Means Policy, which applies in all local authorities, net income for social housing assessment is defined as gross household income less income tax, PRSI and the universal social charge. The Policy provides for a range of income disregards, and local authorities also have discretion to decide to disregard income that is temporary, short-term or once off in nature.

The income bands and the authority area assigned to each band were based on an assessment of the income needed to provide for a household's basic needs, plus a comparative analysis of the local rental cost of housing accommodation across the country. It is important to note that the limits introduced at that time also reflected a blanket increase of €5,000 introduced prior to the new system coming into operation, in order to broaden the base from which social housing tenants are drawn, both promoting sustainable communities and also providing a degree of future-proofing.

Given the cost to the State of providing social housing, it is considered prudent and fair to direct resources to those most in need of social housing support. The current income eligibility requirements generally achieve this, providing for a fair and equitable system of identifying those households facing the greatest challenge in meeting their accommodation needs from their own resources.

However, as part of the broader social housing reform agenda, a review of income eligibility for social housing supports in each local authority area is underway. The Housing Agency is continuing to carry out the detailed statistical work, which will underpin this review, on behalf of my Department.

The review will also have regard to current initiatives being brought forward in terms of affordability and cost rental and will be completed when the impacts of these parallel initiatives have been considered.

Local Authority Housing Data

Questions (647)

Bernard Durkan

Question:

647. Deputy Bernard J. Durkan asked the Minister for Housing, Planning and Local Government the number of local authority houses under construction; when they are likely to be ready for occupation; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [16701/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Housing)

The latest quarterly Social Housing Construction Status Report shows that almost 5,000 social homes were under construction at end Q4 2018, of which 2,345 were in the local authorities' own build programme. It will be these schemes that will form the bulk of the housing delivery over the course of 2019, although further projects will continue to be added to the pipeline on an ongoing basis. The end Q4 2018 report is available on the Rebuilding Ireland website at the following link:

http://rebuildingireland.ie/news/minister-murphy-publishes-social-housing-construction-status-report-for-q4-2018/

I am keen that all local authorities further accelerate their programmes and I have assured them that the necessary funding is available to support their work in this regard.

Approved Housing Bodies

Questions (648)

Bernard Durkan

Question:

648. Deputy Bernard J. Durkan asked the Minister for Housing, Planning and Local Government the number of houses under construction by or for approved housing bodies; the projected completion date of same; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [16702/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Housing)

Rebuilding Ireland is utilising all available resources at national and local level to maximise the delivery of social housing, as quickly and efficiently as possible. More than 50,000 social housing homes will be delivered by the end of 2021. These new homes will be delivered by both local authorities themselves and working in partnership with Approved Housing Bodies (AHBs).

In the interest of transparency and accountability and to facilitate continued solution focused dialogue, my Department publishes quarterly reports outlining progress against the plan. Insofar as local authority and AHB construction projects are concerned, the quarterly Social Housing Construction Status Reports contain information regarding the stage of progress of each project and the number of homes involved, broken down by local authority. The most recent report, setting out the position at end 2018, is available on the Rebuilding Ireland website and can be viewed at the following link:

www.rebuildingireland.ie/news/minister-murphy-publishes-social-housing-construction-status-report-for-q4-2018/.

Last year, 4,251 new homes were brought into the active social housing stock through new build projects, with a further 4,171 brought into productive use through other mechanisms such as acquisitions, voids and leasing programmes. The new build delivery in 2018 represented an 85% increase on the previous year. Indeed, the number of new social housing homes built in 2018 was eight times greater than the number built in 2015, the year before Rebuilding Ireland was introduced. 38% of these homes were delivered by AHBs in partnership with local authorities.

My Department sets national and county targets on an annual basis and works closely with all stakeholders, including AHBs, to facilitate accelerated delivery. Responsibility for delivery of targets is delegated to local authorities in order to enable flexibility and responsiveness to new opportunities to further expand pipelines. Therefore, while my Department publishes targets for each year and quarterly updates on progress against these targets, due to many project and external factors, definitive completion dates can be difficult to project. However, my Department works with local authorities and AHBs on an ongoing basis to ensure that all social housing projects are delivered as efficiently as possible.

Housing Provision

Questions (649)

Bernard Durkan

Question:

649. Deputy Bernard J. Durkan asked the Minister for Housing, Planning and Local Government the extent to which the capital programme in respect of housing, direct build or for approved housing bodies remains on track; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [16703/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Housing)

Local authority build programmes are an essential component of the 50,000 social housing homes to be delivered over the lifetime of Rebuilding Ireland. In addition to local authorities building on their own land, partnerships with Approved Housing Bodies (AHBs) are also an important aspect of build delivery.

Rebuilding Ireland has been increasing the capacity of local authorities and AHBs to deliver social housing over the past three years and clear results are being delivered. This is evident in the fact that there was an 85% increase in new build social homes in 2018 when compared to 2017 (excluding voids) and the number of new social housing homes built in 2018 was eight times greater than the number built in 2015, the year before Rebuilding Ireland was initiated.

My Department supports delivery through the development and implementation of policy and legislation geared towards enhanced supply and also through the provision of significant funding for local authorities. In addition, my Department works closely with each individual local authority to support them to deliver their minimum build targets, and where possible to exceed their targets and advance their pipelines for additional delivery in the coming years. The quarterly Construction Status Reports which I publish provide an overview of all new build social housing completed and being advanced across the 31 local authorities. The latest report, which sets out the position at end 2018, is available on the Rebuilding Ireland website at the following link: http://rebuildingireland.ie/news/minister-murphy-publishes-social-housing-construction-status-report-for-q4-2018/.

In order to deliver effectively and efficiently, local authorities and approved housing bodies are using a combination of the rapid build framework, turnkey opportunities, and through traditional construction methods.

The coming three years will see further increased output of social housing throughout the country and I have recently written to each local authority outlining ambitious targets for 2019. These targets can be viewed at the following link: http://rebuildingireland.ie/news/social-housing-targets-2019/.

In 2019, funding of €2.4 billion is being provided for the delivery of housing programmes, which will allow for the housing needs of almost 27,400 additional households to be met. 10,000 of these will be provided through build, acquisition and lease programmes.

I am confident that progress remains on track to meet the target to deliver 50,000 new homes over the 6 years 2016-2021.

Local Authority Housing Data

Questions (650)

Bernard Durkan

Question:

650. Deputy Bernard J. Durkan asked the Minister for Housing, Planning and Local Government the number of local authority only houses constructed in each of the past five years to date; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [16704/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Housing)

Statistics on the number of social housing properties constructed in each of the past five years by local authorities, are published on my Department’s website at the following link:

https://www.housing.gov.ie/housing/social-housing/social-and-affordble/overall-social-housing-provision.

These statistics are updated on a quarterly basis, with similar details for 2019 to be published as the year progresses.

Local Authority Housing Data

Questions (651)

Bernard Durkan

Question:

651. Deputy Bernard J. Durkan asked the Minister for Housing, Planning and Local Government the number of local authority houses vacant throughout the various local authorities; his plans for the refurbishment and occupation of same; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [16705/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Housing)

The management and maintenance of local authority housing stock, including pre-letting repairs to vacant properties, responsive repairs and implementing planned maintenance programmes, is a matter for each individual local authority, in line with Section 58 of the Housing Act 1966. Local authorities return vacant properties to use through their own resources and also using exchequer support from my Department.

Local authorities will always have a level of vacancy in their housing stock, as the turnover of stock is continuous; a portion of properties will be vacant at any given time between tenancies and that number will not be static. All local authorities, however, are actively encouraged to ensure all vacant properties in their stock are brought back into use as expeditiously as possible. Local authorities have been well supported by my Department in this regard, as well as utilising their own resources to make social homes available to new tenants as soon as possible.

On an ongoing basis, the National Oversight & Audit Commission (NOAC) reviews the social housing stock level in local authorities every year, including the number of vacant local authority houses at a particular point in time.  NOAC’s activities in this regard are summarised in its Annual Performance Indicator Reports for the years 2014-2017, and are set out on a local authority basis at the following link:

http://noac.ie/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/NOAC-Performance-Indicators-Report-2017.pdf.

Water and Sewerage Schemes

Questions (652)

Bernard Durkan

Question:

652. Deputy Bernard J. Durkan asked the Minister for Housing, Planning and Local Government the number of group water schemes being financed by his Department through various local authorities; the number of such schemes abandoned; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [16706/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Housing)

Responsibility for the administration of my Department’s Rural Water Programme, under which funding is provided to the rural water sector, has been devolved to local authorities since 1997.

My Department recoups funding under the Programme to local authorities which administer it on behalf of my Department. In relation to group water schemes, recoupment includes grants for capital works and annual subsidies as a contribution towards the annual operational and management cost of the domestic element of group water schemes.

The capital Multi-annual Rural Water Programme and the annual subsidy are dynamic funding processes with group water scheme numbers constantly changing. Numbers rise as new schemes develop and numbers drop as schemes are taken-in-charge by Irish Water or amalgamate into other schemes. The number of group water schemes for which annual subsidy claims were processed by my Department in 2010 was 738, whereas in 2017 the number had reduced to 654.  Figures for 2018 are currently being compiled by my Department.

My Department does not compile figures in relation to schemes which may have been abandoned.

Water and Sewerage Schemes Provision

Question No. 654 answered with Question No. 106.

Questions (653)

Bernard Durkan

Question:

653. Deputy Bernard J. Durkan asked the Minister for Housing, Planning and Local Government his plans for the reintroduction of a replacement group water scheme (details supplied); and if he will make a statement on the matter. [16707/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Housing)

I understand that the scheme in question commenced planning its development in the early 1990s. At that time the scheme proposed to supply over 800 houses plus farms and commercial premises to a relatively large area of north-west County Kildare – covering some 4 to 5% of the area of the county.

The scheme, the size of a medium sized public water supply scheme, would be very large by group water scheme standards. Accordingly, it was included in my Department’s Water Services Investment Programme 2007-2009 for public schemes. There was little progress on the project over the next number of years and it was not included in my Department’s subsequent Water Services Investment Programme for the period 2010–2013.

Since 1 January 2014, Irish Water has statutory responsibility for all aspects of water services planning, delivery and operation at national, regional and local level.  Irish Water, as a single national utility, is taking a strategic, nationwide approach to asset planning and investment, and meeting customer requirements.

I understand that Kildare County Council and Irish Water met with the scheme in 2015. It became clear at the meeting that there is little prospect of the source of supply for the scheme being included in the Irish Water Capital Investment Programme. I understand that alternatives were also considered but ruled out because they were not technically feasible. Therefore, the scheme would not be able to proceed either in the short or medium term and the promoters of the scheme were informed accordingly by Irish Water. I understand that soon after the 2015 meeting the scheme decided to wind up.

Acknowledging that costs were incurred in development work on the scheme, my Department agreed to recoup an amount of some €79,000 to assist in meeting these costs. Kildare County Council was advised of this position in November 2018 and were recouped the sum earlier this year.

Given the nature of the scheme as set out above, Kildare County Council did not submit a bid for the scheme under the Multi-annual Rural Water Programme announced earlier this year.

Households in the area of the scheme have other alternatives to improve their domestic water supply, if necessary. The Individual Wells Grant under my Department’s Rural Water Programme can be accessed through Kildare County Council, to assist with the provision or necessary improvement of an individual water supply to households.

Question No. 654 answered with Question No. 106.

Wildlife Control

Questions (655)

Maureen O'Sullivan

Question:

655. Deputy Maureen O'Sullivan asked the Minister for Culture, Heritage and the Gaeltacht the licences issued under the Wildlife Act 1975 in each of the past five years in tabular form. [16735/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Culture)

Details of the licences and permits issued by my Department in the period 2014 to 2018 under the Wildlife Act, 1976, as amended are set out in the following table.

TABLE

Section of Wildlife Act, 1976, as amended 

Details  

Licences issued 2014 

 

Licences issued 2015  

Licences issued 2016  

Licences issued 2017  

Licences issued 2018  

Section   21

Protection   of flora

12

12

10

10

10

Section 22, 23 & 34 & 38

Capture of wild birds & wild   animals

Capture Badgers

Film/photograph wild birds/animals

Retain injured animals

Retain injured birds

Pen reared birds

Hunt protected birds to train gun   dogs

Examine nests, take the eggs

Use of lamp

145

 

29

 

116

44

30

99

 

7

60

0

178

 

29

 

133

149

55

95

 

3

55

1

167

 

28

 

88

136

44

89

 

4

64

0

161

 

0

 

123

136

98

90

 

1

67

0

207

 

16

 

145

101

32

69

 

2

64

1

Section   29

Deer   hunting

4,481

4,653

5,083

5,175

5,502

Section   30

Hunting   over state foreshore/lakes

499

450

382

467

341

Section 32

Ringing/marking protected wild   birds/animals

81   general

23   special

10   other

80

30

4

86

40

0

112

31

0

89

36

4

Section   26, 32, 34

Capture and tag hares

3

3

3

3

3

Section   35

Use   of lures, decoys, scarecrows

35

53

48

72

74

Section   36

Use   of mechanically propelled vehicles

17

42

23

14

22

Section 41

-Birds of prey: possession engage in falconry 

-Take a bird from the wild

 

432

9

 

629

7

 

689

17

 

670

8

 

566

9

Section   42

Serious   damage caused by protected wild animals/birds

355

459

501

559

678

Section   48

Wildlife   dealers

78

78

69

92

86

Totals

-

6,451

7,198

7,571

7,889

8,057

Arts and Culture Capital Scheme Funding

Questions (656)

Tony McLoughlin

Question:

656. Deputy Tony McLoughlin asked the Minister for Culture, Heritage and the Gaeltacht if she will correct the reply to Parliamentary Question No. 743 of 12 March 2019, in view of the fact that the information therein is inaccurate (details supplied); and if she will make a statement on the matter. [16106/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Culture)

The theatre to which the Deputy refers was awarded substantial funding under the Arts and Culture Capital Scheme 2016-2018 in February 2017 to refurbish and enhance the existing facility. As set out in my reply of 12 March 2019, all capital grants exceeding €300,000 require a legal charge on the property being developed for the amount of the grant for a period of 15 years. This charge is to protect the taxpayer's investment in the property if it was to undergo a change of use or in the event of its sale.

The Chief State Solicitors Office (CSSO) is seeking to complete the legal formalities in order that the grant can be paid to the theatre to which the Deputy refers. The CSSO has been in negotiations with both the solicitors representing the theatre and the theatre's landlord for some time now and work has progressed significantly in the last three months. At this point, the necessary Deed of Agreement has been agreed by the relevant parties and is ready to be signed and sealed by both parties. The CSSO in conjunction with the grantee's solicitors will then ensure that all the relevant legal searches are in order. The grantees solicitors must then lodge the charge in the Companies Registration Office within 21 days from date of these search results. On completion of the legal formalities which should take no more than one month, it is hoped that the theatre can then make progress on the project.

National Museum

Questions (657)

Brendan Howlin

Question:

657. Deputy Brendan Howlin asked the Minister for Culture, Heritage and the Gaeltacht if she has raised with the National Museum of Ireland the need for a permanent stand-alone exhibition to the Great Famine; the series of events planned for 2019 to mark the Great Famine; the funding allocated for same; her plans to mark the Great Famine; and if she will make a statement on the matter. [16168/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Culture)

As Chair of the National Famine Commemoration Committee (NFCC), I am responsible for ensuring that appropriate arrangements are in place to commemorate the Great Irish Famine. This year’s National Famine Commemoration will take place on 19th May in Sligo and will officiated at by An Taoiseach.

Proposals are currently being developed by officials of my Department and Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade in relation to the 2019 International Famine Commemoration and these will be submitted to the Committee for consideration shortly.

As I have previously advised the House decisions in relation to the curation and presentation of temporary or permanent exhibitions within State funded museums in Dublin are operational matters for the relevant cultural institutions or other entities concerned.

Heritage Council Funding

Questions (658)

Seán Fleming

Question:

658. Deputy Sean Fleming asked the Minister for Culture, Heritage and the Gaeltacht the funding available for community grants from the Heritage Council in 2017, 2018 and 2019; and if she will make a statement on the matter. [16200/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Culture)

The Heritage Council, which is funded by my Department, is independent in the performance of its functions. It is primarily a matter for the Heritage Council itself to decide how its funding is allocated across the range of research, education and conservation programmes it supports, including its Community Grants Scheme and funding for local heritage plans.

I was pleased to announce increased funding of €6.588 million for the Council 2019, compared to €6.377 million in 2018.

The voted funding allocation to the Heritage Council each year is published in the Department of Public Expenditure and Reform’s Revised Estimates Volume. The amounts since 2015 are as follows:

Year 

Total (€m)

Year 

Total (€m)

2015 

4,743

2016 

5,243

2017 

6,254

2018

6,377

2019

6,588

The Heritage Council is at an exciting and defining moment in 2019 with the launch of its Strategic Plan Heritage at the Heart 2018-2022 and the appointment of its new CEO, Virginia Teehan, from 1 February. The new CEO will bring her own talent and vision to everything the Council does, including its grant schemes. The Council recently announced that six historic towns will share in €1 million in capital funding under the Historic Towns Initiative 2019. I understand that final decisions on further funding in 2019 across the Council’s various activities will be made by the new CEO and the Council in the coming weeks and announcements will be made by the Heritage Council in due course.

EU Directives

Questions (659)

Seán Haughey

Question:

659. Deputy Seán Haughey asked the Minister for Culture, Heritage and the Gaeltacht if she is seeking derogations for Ireland under the EU Birds Directive in respect of seagulls; if action can be taken regarding a major problem with seagulls in the Dublin area; and if she will make a statement on the matter. [16608/19]

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Written answers (Question to Culture)

The EU Birds Directive allows Member States to make derogations from its protective measures in respect of certain wild bird species in certain circumstances – for example, where they are causing damage to crops, livestock and fauna or represent a threat to public health or safety or to air safety. The Declarations to implement these derogations are renewed annually and an annual review of the Declarations is undertaken prior to their expiry.

The 2017 review took into account the issue of seagulls in the North Dublin area especially in Balbriggan which had been the subject of correspondence to my Department from some community groups and other residents which proposed the inclusion of seagull species in the Declaration.

Following consideration of the matter, the Declaration, which was effective from 1 May 2017 to 30 April 2018, included methods to control seagull species in the Balbriggan area for public safety reasons. The control method involved the removal of eggs and nests only and the culling of seagulls was not permitted. Similar provision was made in the Declaration effective from 1 May 2018 to 30 April 2019.

My Department undertook a review of the derogation process under Article 9 of the EU Birds Directive which took account of all relevant factors, including perceived threats, distribution and population data available in respect of all the bird species in the derogations. ANIAR Ecology were appointed by my Department to undertake the review following a public tendering process. The final report of the consultants was published in October last year and is available on the website of the National Parks and Wildlife Service of my Department at www.npws.ie.

One of the recommendations of the consultant’s report was the setting up of a group to agree a programme of action in relation to the seagull situation in the certain urban areas. I have agreed to the formation of a Consultative Committee, with an independent chair, whose membership will include representatives of the National Parks and Wildlife Service of my Department, Fingal County Council, local community representatives and a conservation group. My Department is finalising the composition of the Committee with a view to convening the first meeting of the Committee shortly.

Architectural Heritage

Questions (660)

Niamh Smyth

Question:

660. Deputy Niamh Smyth asked the Minister for Culture, Heritage and the Gaeltacht the status of a matter (details supplied); if she will meet this Deputy in relation to same; and if she will make a statement on the matter. [16634/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Culture)

My role with regard to the protection and management of our architectural heritage is set out in the provisions of relevant legislation, as are the roles of local authorities and the responsibilities of owners.

Part IV of the Planning and Development Act 2000, as amended, gives primary responsibility to planning authorities to identify and protect the architectural heritage by including particular structures on their Record of Protected Structures. Inclusion on the Record of Protected Structures places a duty of care on the owners and occupiers of protected structures and also gives planning authorities powers to deal with development proposals affecting them and to seek to safeguard their future.

The building mentioned by the Deputy is in the ownership and management of the local authority, and is, in the first instance a matter for it. It is recorded in my Department’s National Inventory of Architectural Heritage and is rated there as of Regional Importance. As such it was recommended to the local authority for inclusion in its Record of Protected Structures.

As the owner of this protected structure, the local authority has a duty under the Acts to ensure the structure does not become endangered. I am informed that there is considerable work underway at present in advance of conducting an analysis of its structural integrity. The Council have informed my Department that no decision in relation to the future of the structure can be made until this assessment is completed.

In terms of the support that my Department can offer, my role in relation to protected structures is mainly advisory. My officials remain available to advise the County Council in its efforts to manage the building and see it returned to a sustainable use that is consistent with its significant history and position in the town.

My Department also provides financial support for the protection of heritage buildings and historic structures through the Historic Structures Fund (HSF) and the Built Heritage Investment Scheme (BHIS), which are administered by local authorities. On Thursday 28 March, I announced funding of €4.3 m for 478 projects under these schemes in 2019. Details of these projects and the funding are available on my Department's website and local authority websites. I understand, however, that the scale of investment needed for the structure mentioned would mean that the levels of grant funding available under these schemes would not be sufficient.

I fully understand and appreciate the value of our built heritage at a local level and I have asked officials in my Department to arrange to meet with the  Deputy, along with Monaghan County Council, to discuss the location in question.