Tuesday, 11 June 2019

Questions (68)

Clare Daly

Question:

68. Deputy Clare Daly asked the Minister for Housing, Planning and Local Government if he will bring forward measures to ban or severely restrict the use of posters during election campaigns in order to reduce plastic waste; and if not, the reason therefor. [23732/19]

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Written answers (Question to Housing)

Election and referendum posters are regulated by law under the Litter Pollution Act 1997 (as amended) and by electoral law. Electoral law provides that every notice, bill, poster or similar document having reference to a Dáil, Presidential or European election or to a referendum shall bear upon its face the name and address of the printer and publisher thereof. Failure to comply with this provision is an offence. The Electoral Acts do not regulate the content of electoral material, including election posters, either during or outside of electoral campaigns.

The Litter Pollution Act (section 19(7)) provides that election or referendum posters may be erected/exhibited for a specified time period prior to and after a polling date. Failure to comply with this provision is also an offence. This legislation ensures that posters are only displayed for a finite and reasonable period.

There is no requirement in law that posters at an election or referendum must be erected. It is open to political parties, candidates or other groups to decide whether or not to do so. There is also no requirement in law that posters must be made of plastic or have a plastic component. Again it is open to political parties, candidates or other groups to decide whether or not to use plastic materials in their posters.

While electoral law is subject to ongoing review, I have no plans in the short term to revise the legislation in regard to the physical composition of election posters or to the erection of election posters.

Question No. 69 answered with Question No. 62.