Roads Maintenance Funding

Questions (672)

Mary Butler

Question:

672. Deputy Mary Butler asked the Minister for Transport, Tourism and Sport the discretionary road grants provided through Transport Infrastructure Ireland to individual local authorities; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [26636/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Transport)

The improvement and maintenance of regional and local roads is the statutory responsibility of the relevant local authority in accordance with the provisions of Section 13 of the Roads Act 1993. Works on those roads are funded from the Council's own resources supplemented by State road grants. Each local authority is the contracting authority for the purpose of implementation of regional and local road improvement projects.

While payments in respect of regional and local road grants are processed on TII's payment system sign-off on all such payments is provided by the Department.

Details of grant allocations, including Discretionary Grant allocations, to individual local authorities can be found in the 2019 Regional and Local Road allocation booklet available in the Oireachtas library. Details of grant payments for previous years are set out in the Regional and Local Road grant payment booklets which are also available in the Oireachtas library.

Climate Change Policy

Questions (673, 674, 675, 676)

Eamon Ryan

Question:

673. Deputy Eamon Ryan asked the Minister for Transport, Tourism and Sport the estimated cost per tonne of abating greenhouse gas emissions by diverting freight to rail. [26658/19]

View answer

Eamon Ryan

Question:

674. Deputy Eamon Ryan asked the Minister for Transport, Tourism and Sport the estimated cost per tonne of abating greenhouse gas emissions by facilitating and incentivising switching from diesel and petrol cars to electric cars. [26659/19]

View answer

Eamon Ryan

Question:

675. Deputy Eamon Ryan asked the Minister for Transport, Tourism and Sport the estimated cost per tonne of abating greenhouse gas emissions by facilitating and incentivising modal shift from cars to public transport. [26660/19]

View answer

Eamon Ryan

Question:

676. Deputy Eamon Ryan asked the Minister for Transport, Tourism and Sport the estimated cost per tonne of abating greenhouse gas emissions by facilitating and incentivising modal shift from cars to bicycles. [26661/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Transport)

I propose to take Questions Nos. 673 to 676, inclusive, together.

Central to the development of the new Climate Action Plan was the economic evaluation of key emission mitigation technologies. A Marginal Abatement Cost Curve approach (MACC) was used to compare ‘business-as-usual’ economic activity to ‘low carbon’ options. In the Plan an estimated marginal cost per tonne of carbon abated was attributed to certain technologies. This technique allows for comparative analysis of ‘low carbon’ alternatives across key sectors. An overview of costs and emission reduction potential of sector-specific mitigation approaches can be found in Table 4.2 of the Climate Action Plan (page 28) https://www.dccae.gov.ie/documents/Climate%20Action%20Plan%202019.pdf).

According to this analysis some of the most cost-effective abatement opportunities - from a societal perspective - include the electrification of transport. This is expected due to fast-falling battery prices, which are likely to put the lifetime total cost of ownership of electric vehicles on par with those of fossil fuel vehicles over the next decade or so. The Climate Action Plan shows the expected average abatement cost over the period 2021 to 2030 for switching from fossil-fuelled passenger cars to electric vehicles on a total cost of ownership basis at around -€116 cost per tonne.

The information requested by the Deputy in relation to the estimated cost per tonne of emissions abated through measures that encourage modal shift to either public transport or active travel is less readily available. Nevertheless, indicative calculations by my Department estimate that by replacing 10,000 daily car journeys with cycling (assuming the replaced car journey length was equivalent to the average bike journey length in the Greater Dublin Area (GDA)) approximately 37.25 ktCO2 could be abated between 2020 and 2030. The National Transport Authority has also estimated that replacing 10% of car trips in the GDA (travelling the average GDA morning peak distance) with public transport could potentially result in an annual emission abatement of 22ktCO2.. For context, the transport sector in Ireland emitted a little over 12,000 ktCO2 in 2017.

To further reduce the carbon footprint of modal shift towards public transport I have committed to continuing to improve the energy and emissions efficiencies of the public transport fleets. In the urban bus fleet, a clear trajectory to low emission buses has been outlined with no more diesel-only buses being purchased for the urban public bus fleet from next month and by 2035 to only have low-emitting buses in the urban PSO bus fleet. My Department has estimated that when the entire bus fleet is converted to low-emitting that up to 15 ktCO2 will be saved annually compared to the business-as-usual diesel fleet.

It is also important to consider the potential contribution of electrified rail to mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions. We plan to create a full metropolitan area DART network for the Greater Dublin Area; this is the part of the national rail network that carries over 75% of total rail passengers each year. It will mean high-frequency electrified rail services to Drogheda, Celbridge/Hazelhatch, Maynooth and M3 Parkway, as well as new interchange stations with bus, LUAS and Metro networks, resulting in approximately 130 ktCO2 ­annual abatement when complete. The NTA and Iarnród Éireann have recently commenced a procurement process for the establishment of a 10 year framework agreement for the purchase of additional lower-emitting rail fleet required for the expansion of the DART network. In addition, the delivery of eight additional high capacity Luas trams could also reduce emissions by 12 ktCO2 per annum, assuming the Luas trips replace 63.3 million kms driven by private car. These major rail projects will help supplement the range of viable low carbon alternatives to private passenger car travel and positively impact on our sectoral emissions profile.

It is clear that prioritising investment in our public and active transport network and encouraging modal shift is working – during the reporting period of 2017 alone, an additional 16 million public transport passenger journeys were made in Ireland while the number of walking and cycling trips also increased, particularly within the Greater Dublin Area. Collectively, these efforts have resulted in activities that yield fewer CO2 emissions in addition to reducing vehicle volume and improving air quality. In fact, 2017 saw a welcome return to a drop in transport sector emissions, the first time in four years.

Finally, in relation to the Deputy’s question regarding diverting freight to rail, it is important to note that Irish rail freight quantities are comparatively small and have declined over recent decades. Long run data from the CSO shows that the total tonnage of goods carried by rail decreased from 3.4 million tonnes in 1985 to 581,000 tonnes in 2016. Internationally, where viable, rail freight can be a lower emitting alternative to road freight, particularly over long distances with bulky loads. However, in Ireland, the limited number of high-volume bulk movements combined with the country's small size and low density of activity means that rail freight is not generally as economically viable as road freight, although in certain, specific circumstances it does provide a viable alternative.

Driver Test

A referred reply was forwarded to the Deputy under Standing Order 42A

Questions (677)

Michael Healy-Rae

Question:

677. Deputy Michael Healy-Rae asked the Minister for Transport, Tourism and Sport the reason a reader (details supplied) is not available in County Kerry; if same will be provided; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [26743/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Transport)

This is a matter for the Road Safety Authority. I have referred the question to the Authority for direct reply. I would ask the Deputy to contact my office if a response is not received within ten days.

A referred reply was forwarded to the Deputy under Standing Order 42A

Haulage Industry Regulation

Questions (678)

Tom Neville

Question:

678. Deputy Tom Neville asked the Minister for Transport, Tourism and Sport if a derogation from the new smart tachograph regulations will be provided to companies that purchased vehicles prior to the introduction of the regulations and were carrying out works on the vehicles pre-registration (details supplied); and if he will make a statement on the matter. [26756/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Transport)

The improvement of road safety for all road users is an important aim of the regulations that lay down rules on the requirement for tachograph in the road transport sector. These regulations are Regulation (EU) No 165/2014, Commission Implementing Regulation (EU) 2016/799 and Commission Implementing Regulation (EU) 2018/502, which states the following:

(3) In accordance with Articles 8, 9 and 10 of Regulation (EU) No 165/2014, tachographs installed in vehicles registered for the first time on or after 15 June 2019 shall be smart tachographs. Implementing Regulation (EU) 2016/799 must therefore be amended so that the technical provisions laid down therein apply from that date.

The smart tachograph must be fitted to all vehicles in scope that are registered from 15 June 2019 onwards. There are no provisions for any derogations in the Regulations as they stand, to allow for any exceptions to this rule. As Commission Regulations, these have direct effect throughout the EU and any question of a derogation would require consideration at European rather than national level.

I trust this clarifies the position in this regard.

Bus Services

Questions (679)

Denis Naughten

Question:

679. Deputy Denis Naughten asked the Minister for Transport, Tourism and Sport if consideration will be given to relocating a bus stop (details supplied); and if he will make a statement on the matter. [26763/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Transport)

The issue raised is a matter for Bus Éireann and I have forwarded the Deputy's question to the company for direct reply. Please advise my private office if you do not receive a response within ten working days.

Road Improvement Schemes

Questions (680)

Donnchadh Ó Laoghaire

Question:

680. Deputy Donnchadh Ó Laoghaire asked the Minister for Transport, Tourism and Sport if his attention has been drawn to the situation regarding the L2455 Lehenaghbeg-Lehenaghmore road; if the NTA has submitted its latest observations to the local authority regarding the design; the way in which he plans to expedite an urgently needed road; if funding will be forthcoming; and when he expects the road to be delivered. [26837/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Transport)

The improvement and maintenance of regional and local roads is the statutory responsibility of each local authority. Works on those roads are funded from the Council's own resources supplemented by State road grants. The initial selection and prioritisation of works to be funded is also a matter for the Council.

Before the financial crisis, local authorities could apply on a regular basis for grants for Specific or Strategic Improvement Grants for the strengthening, widening or realignment of regional and local roads. However, the extent of the cutbacks in grant funding during the crisis meant these grant schemes had to be curtailed after 2013 because expenditure on maintenance/renewal was falling well short of what was required to adequately maintain the regional and local road network.

Project Ireland 20240 does provide for the gradual build up in funding for the road network but it will take time. For this reason there is limited scope at present for funding projects under the Specific or Strategic Grant Programme.

Any projects proposed by local authorities for consideration under these Grant Programmes are assessed by the Department on a case-by-case basis. All projects put forward by local authorities for consideration must comply with the requirements of the Public Spending Code and my Department's Capital Appraisal Framework and it is important for local authorities to prioritise projects within their overall area of responsibility with these requirements in mind.

I understand that Cork County Council, which had responsibility for Lehenaghmore, had prepared a draft road improvement scheme for the area with a view to improving public transport and pedestrian access. Responsibility for Lehenaghmore has now been transferred to Cork City Council. I understand that there has been interaction between both Councils and the National Transport Authority regarding the scheme which fed into a review of aspects of the design. Once the design of the proposed scheme is finalised it will be for the Council to decide how best to proceed.

If funding is sought under the Regional and Local Road Programme, a Preliminary Appraisal in relation to the proposed upgrade will have to be submitted as required under the capital project appraisal process. Once an appraisal is received it has to be assessed taking into account other competing projects and the overall roads budget. Such an appraisal has not been submitted to date by Cork County Council or Cork City Council in relation to the upgrade of the L2455 Lehenaghbeg/Lehenaghmore road. It is also open to the Council to consider other sources of funding, including own resources.

Industrial Relations

Questions (681)

Jan O'Sullivan

Question:

681. Deputy Jan O'Sullivan asked the Minister for Transport, Tourism and Sport if his attention has been drawn to the fact that a company (details supplied) has refused to accept an invitation extended by the WRC to attend a conciliation conference with a union regarding a range of issues affecting the members of the union at the company; his views on the fact that this beneficiary of a significant State contract continues to ignore the industrial relations machinery of the State; the cost, value and duration of the NCT contract with the company; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [26889/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Transport)

The operation of the NCT contract is a matter for the Road Safety Authority. Neither I nor the Authority have any role in the industrial relations of commercial entities, whether or not they happen to secure particular contracts with the Authority.

Mother and Baby Homes Inquiries

Questions (682)

Catherine Connolly

Question:

682. Deputy Catherine Connolly asked the Minister for Children and Youth Affairs the reason the May 2019 meeting of the collaborative forum of former residents of mother and baby homes and related institutions did not take place; and if she will make a statement on the matter. [26060/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Children)

Following the receipt of the Collaborative Forum's first report, I signalled the opportunity to take some time to reflect upon the learning from the process to date. In this way the mandate of the Forum can be refined to further enhance the State's engagement with former residents.

Ahead of holding a meeting with the Forum, I intend to examine how best to conduct a focused interim evaluation which involves the Forum members and considers important issues relating to the Forum's composition and mandate.

I am also actively considering the composition of the Forum to ensure the continuity of the process.

I hope to engage directly with Forum members on the future of the Forum in the coming weeks.

Early Childhood Care and Education Funding

Questions (683)

James Browne

Question:

683. Deputy James Browne asked the Minister for Children and Youth Affairs the funding provided to an organisation (details supplied) for the purposes of providing childcare in County Wexford in the past five years. [26330/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Children)

The organisation in question operates a number of Early Learning and Care (ELC) and School Age Childcare (SAC) services in County Wexford. These services offer a range of ELC/SAC programmes, including the Early Childhood Care and Education (ECCE) programme, the Community Childcare Subvention (CCS) programme, Community Childcare Subvention Plus (CCSP) programme, Training and Education Childcare (TEC) programme and the Access and Inclusion Model (AIM).

The table below outlines the funding paid to the organisation in question for ECCE, CCS, CCSP, TEC and AIM, as well as Capital funding over the years 2014 to 2019.

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

Total Paid 2014-2019

428,714.00

355,317.98

357,486.93

590,649.03

590,461.98

273,531.46

2,596,161.38

Childcare Services Provision

Questions (684)

James Browne

Question:

684. Deputy James Browne asked the Minister for Children and Youth Affairs the provisions that will be made to provide childcare to children whose parents are long-term unemployed but in need of additional childcare assistance arising from addiction or other personal issues. [26331/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Children)

Through the National Childcare Scheme and a range of other measures, I am committed to changing Ireland’s childcare system from one of the most expensive in the world to one of the very best. In designing the National Childcare Scheme, extensive research and consultations have been carried out to ensure that this goal is achieved and that the Scheme can help as many families as possible.

The National Childcare Scheme will greatly increase the number of families who can access financial support. The Scheme removes many of the restrictive eligibility requirements of the existing support programmes, whereby a parent must be in receipt of certain Social Protection payments or a Medical Card in order to receive targeted supports. In this way, it aims to combat the poverty traps which may exist within the existing schemes, and to make work pay for parents.

I have also worked to poverty-proof the Scheme by ensuring that families at or below the relative income poverty line will benefit from the highest subsidy rates under the Scheme. Indeed, international reports have stated that the Scheme will significantly address affordability for lower income families, with analysis showing that Ireland will, for example, change from being the most expensive country in the OECD for childcare for lone parents, to 11th position.

In addition, the National Childcare Scheme includes specific arrangements for vulnerable children and families to be sponsored by certain statutory bodies to enable such children to avail of free or additional childcare under the Scheme. The five statutory bodies specified as sponsors in the Childcare Support Act 2018, and the specific groups of children who will benefit, are:

- Minister for Education and Skills - for teen parents who are still in education or training;

- Minister for Justice and Equality - for refugees and asylum seekers, to enable parents' participation in education, integration and other relevant supports;

- Child and Family Agency - to promote the welfare of children, either where there is a child protection concern, or as a form of early intervention or family support;

- HSE - to support child development for children who are below the age for participation in ECCE and where there is an identified need for childcare as a developmental support for the child; and

- Local Authorities – to support homeless persons with children that are homeless or moving out of homelessness to access childcare services.

Arrangements are also in place to ensure that no one loses out in the initial transition to the new Scheme. All families in receipt of current targeted supports will have the choice to switch over to the new scheme when it launches or to remain on their current support (i.e. effectively remain on their current payment) until at least the end of August 2020.

Department officials have also been directed to undertake research and analysis to examine any adjustments to the National Childcare Scheme which might be required to address unusual or anomalous cases, where this is the right thing to do to protect and benefit lower income parents. In this regard, I would highlight that the new National Childcare Scheme has been designed to be flexible, with income thresholds, maximum hours and subsidy rates which can be adjusted in line with Government decisions and as more investment becomes available. As such, any adjustments deemed necessary by Government can be carried out in a quick and responsive manner.

Freedom of Information Data

Questions (685)

Jonathan O'Brien

Question:

685. Deputy Jonathan O'Brien asked the Minister for Children and Youth Affairs the number of freedom of information requests granted, part granted, refused, transferred to an appropriate body, withdrawn or handled outside freedom of information in 2018, in tabular form. [26386/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Children)

The information requested by the Deputy is provided in the table below.

No of Requests Received in 2018

Granted

Part Granted

Refused

Transferred

Withdrawn/Handled outside of FOI

Cases brought forward to 2019

136

40

71

12

0

3

10

Aftercare Services Provision

Questions (686)

Jan O'Sullivan

Question:

686. Deputy Jan O'Sullivan asked the Minister for Children and Youth Affairs if locations in which parents cannot access an afterschool place for their children following the introduction of the new childcare scheme are assisted to provide such places in order that parents can fulfil their work commitments; and if she will make a statement on the matter. [26522/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Children)

The National Childcare Scheme (NCS), which will be introduced later this year, is a new user-friendly scheme to help parents meet the cost of quality childcare. The development of this Scheme is a significant move forward in delivering quality, accessible, affordable childcare to families throughout Ireland.

The NCS will greatly increase the number of families who can access financial support for Early Learning and Care (ELC) and School Age Childcare (SAC) cost. The Scheme removes many of the restrictive eligibility requirements of the existing support programmes, whereby a parent must be in receipt of certain Social Protection payments or a Medical Card in order to receive targeted supports. It will also make work pay for parents trying to get back into employment or training as they will now be able to avail of help with their childcare costs. Many working families will, for the first time, be entitled to subsidies which will reduce their childcare costs significantly. Others will see an increase in their level of subsidy.

I am committed to transforming the Irish childcare system from one of the most expensive in the world to one of the best. This requires sustained investment over several years. Over the last four budgets, investment in childcare has increased by 117%, while over past four years, childcare places in Ireland have doubled and the overall number of children supported by State subsidies has doubled.

I will continue to support providers with regard to increased provision of early learning and care and school age childcare places. In 2019, I have secured a capital budget of €6.25m for the sector which will enable a focus on further increasing the number of places available, and supporting the transition of services to the forthcoming National Childcare Scheme.

In terms of specific capital funding made available for School Age Childcare services, €1m was allocated, with individual grants of up to €20,000 in value available for providers for the creation of new school age places. It is anticipated that this funding will assist in the creation of more than 2,300 additional school age places.

I am also very pleased to have ensured that childcare was identified as a strategic priority in the National Development Plan ( 2018-2027) and to have secured €250m in capital funding for early learning and care and school age childcare under the plan. This represents the kind of large-scale investment in the sector by the State that has not been undertaken since the National Childcare Investment Programme that concluded in 2010.

This capital investment will, I believe, be essential to respond to the increased demand in the years ahead. Research is on-going in my Department to determine areas of specific need that the National Development Plan funding will address when it comes on-stream.

Cycling Facilities Funding

Questions (687)

Robert Troy

Question:

687. Deputy Robert Troy asked the Minister for Children and Youth Affairs the amount spent on cycling infrastructure by location and nature of expenditure in 2018 and to date in 2019, respectively in tabular form. [26587/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Children)

My Department has no responsibility for the development of cycling infrastructure nationally. In terms of supporting employees wishing to cycle to work, my Department provides secure parking facilities for cyclists as part of its overall lease arrangement via the Office of Public Works.

Youth Services Funding

Questions (688)

Thomas P. Broughan

Question:

688. Deputy Thomas P. Broughan asked the Minister for Children and Youth Affairs the grants and funding issued to organisations and projects in the Dublin 5, 13 and 17 areas in 2018 and to date in 2019, in tabular form; and if she will make a statement on the matter. [26601/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Children)

In 2019, €60.4m has been allocated in current funding to support the provision of youth services, an increase of €1.5m on 2018. This additional funding is being used for programmes that target disadvantaged young people and to assist national youth organisations in their work to support local voluntary youth services.

I have also provided an additional 12% in overall funding for the Local Youth Club Grant Scheme, which supports youth work activities at a local level, bringing the total allocation to over €2m.

The details of the grants and funding issued to organisations and projects in the Dublin 5, 13 and 17 areas in 2018 and to date in 2019 can be found in the table below. This information was supplied by the City of Dublin Youth Services Board. Please note that the list includes payments in the City of Dublin Youth Services Board system that are processed and due for payment on 27th June.

Post Code

Category

Group Name

Year

Grant Type

Grant Amount

D05

Club

140th Dublin Beaumont Scout Group

2018

General

€5,250.00

D05

Club

160th Dublin Ardlea Scout Unit

2018

General

€2,770.00

D05

Club

35th Dublin Grange Scout Group

2018

General

€2,180.00

D05

Club

58th/85th Dublin Donnycarney Scout Group

2018

General

€2,650.00

D05

Club

73rd Dublin (Raheny) Scouting Ireland

2018

General

€5,546.25

D05

Club

74th Scout Troop - Edenmore

2018

General

€2,600.00

D05

Club

80th Dublin St Brendans Coolock Scout Group

2018

General

€2,590.00

D05

Club

Beaumont Foroige Club

2018

General

€600.00

D05

Club

Buion an Leanbh Prague Guides

2018

General

€2,750.00

D05

Club

Buion Naomh Breandan Guides

2018

General

€5,000.00

D05

Club

Maranatha Youth Club

2018

General

€4,170.00

D05

Club

Order of Malta Raheny Unit

2018

General

€2,160.00

D05

Club

Raheny Foroige Club

2018

General

€2,690.00

D05

Club

Sliebh Mór Outdoor Sports Club

2018

General

€2,400.00

D05

Club

St John Ambulance Clontarf Cadet Division

2018

General

€2,380.00

D05

Club

St Pauls Youth Club (Artane)

2018

General

€3,250.00

D05

Project

Donnycarney Youth Project

2018

SPY

€121,353.00

D05

Project

Donnycarney Youth Project

2018

YPFSF 2

€57,696.00

D05

Project

Kilmore West Youth Project CLG

2018

YPFSF 1

€128,995.00

D05

Project

Le Cheile Donnycarney Community & Youth Centre CLG

2018

YPFSF 2

€164,275.00

D05

Project

St Monica's Youth Project

2018

New Initiative Grant

€10,000.00

D05

Project

St Monica's Youth Project

2018

YPFSF 1

€119,111.00

D13

Club

46th Dublin Scout Group

2018

General

€2,680.00

D13

Club

Cool Side of God YC

2018

General

€2,390.00

D13

Club

Dublin All Stars Marching Band

2018

General

€4,750.00

D13

Project

Trinity & Priorswood Youth Service

2018

DCYA Capital Grant

€7,855.00

D13

Project

Trinity & Priorswood Youth Service

2018

SPY

€69,978.00

D13

Project

Trinity & Priorswood Youth Service

2018

YPFSF 1

€62,932.00

D17

Club

130th Dublin Priorswood Scout Group

2018

General

€4,100.00

D17

Club

Dance X

2018

General

€3,290.00

D17

Club

Dom Savio Club

2018

General

€2,310.00

D17

Club

New Life for Youth

2018

General

€5,000.00

D17

Project

Sphere 17 Regional Youth Service

2018

DCYA Capital Grant

€18,587.00

D17

Project

Sphere 17 Regional Youth Service

2018

LDTF Mainstream

€123,264.00

D17

Project

Sphere 17 Regional Youth Service

2018

SPY

€281,957.00

D17

Project

Sphere 17 Regional Youth Service

2018

YPFSF 1

€160,699.00

D17

Project

Sphere 17 Regional Youth Service

2018

YPFSF 2

€432,862.00

D17

Project

TRAVACT - Northside Travellers Support Group (NE2-9)

2018

SPY

€82,254.00

€1,915,324.25

D05

Club

160th Dublin Ardlea Scout Unit

2019

General

€2,750.00

D05

Club

58th/85th Dublin Donnycarney Scout Group

2019

General

€3,250.00

D05

Club

73rd Dublin (Raheny) Scouting Ireland

2019

General

€3,860.00

D05

Club

74th Scout Troop - Edenmore

2019

General

€5,000.00

D05

Club

80th Dublin St Brendans Coolock Scout Group

2019

General

€2,600.00

D05

Club

Buion Naomh Breandan Guides

2019

General

€2,750.00

D05

Club

Order of Malta Raheny Unit

2019

General

€2,270.00

D05

Club

Raheny Foroige Club

2019

General

€2,400.00

D05

Club

St Pauls Youth Club (Artane)

2019

General

€5,250.00

D05

Project

Donnycarney Youth Project

2019

TYFS

€134,286.00

D05

Project

Kilmore West Youth Project CLG

2019

TYFS

€61,996.00

D05

Project

Le Cheile Donnycarney Community & Youth Centre CLG

2019

TYFS

€82,134.00

D05

Project

St Monica's Youth Project

2019

TYFS

€57,054.00

D13

Club

46th Dublin Scout Group

2019

General

€4,695.00

D13

Club

Cool Side of God YC

2019

General

€2,340.00

D13

Club

Dublin All Stars Marching Band

2019

General

€2,750.00

D13

Project

Trinity & Priorswood Youth Service

2019

TYFS

€95,931.00

D17

Club

130th Dublin Priorswood Scout Group

2019

General

€3,000.00

D17

Club

Dance X

2019

General

€3,250.00

D17

Club

New Life for Youth

2019

General

€5,500.00

D17

Project

Sphere 17 Regional Youth Service

2019

TYFS

€749,086.00

D17

Project

TRAVACT - Northside Travellers Support Group (NE2-9)

2019

TYFS

€41,124.00

€1,273,276.00

Post Code

Category

Group Name

Year

Grant Type

Grant Amount

D05

Summer Project

74th Scout Troop - Edenmore

2018

General

€750.00

D05

Summer Project

Artane Summer Project

2018

General

€500.00

D05

Summer Project

Blossom Ireland Discovery Camp

2018

General

€750.00

D05

Summer Project

Raheny Summer Project

2018

General

€500.00

D05

Summer Project

Supercool Summer Project

2018

General

€750.00

D17

Summer Project

Aoibhneas Womens & Childrens Refuge (Coolock)

2018

General

€1,000.00

D17

Summer Project

Dance X

2018

General

€1,000.00

D17

Summer Project

Dean Swift Summer Camp

2018

General

€750.00

D17

Summer Project

Dom Savio Club

2018

General

€250.00

D17

Summer Project

New Life for Youth

2018

General

€1,000.00

€7,250.00

D05

Summer Project

74th Scout Troop - Edenmore

2019

General

€750.00

D05

Summer Project

Artane Summer Project

2019

General

€500.00

D05

Summer Project

Raheny Summer Project

2019

General

€500.00

D05

Summer Project

Supercool Summer Project

2019

General

€750.00

D17

Summer Project

Aoibhneas Womens & Childrens Refuge (Coolock)

2019

General

€1,000.00

D17

Summer Project

Dance X

2019

General

€1,000.00

D17

Summer Project

Dean Swift Summer Camp

2019

General

€750.00

D17

Summer Project

New Life for Youth

2019

General

€1,000.00

€6,250.00

Youth Services Expenditure

Questions (689)

Thomas P. Broughan

Question:

689. Deputy Thomas P. Broughan asked the Minister for Children and Youth Affairs the estimated full-year cost if the budget for the youth sector increased by 4.5%; and if she will make a statement on the matter. [26602/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Children)

My Department administers a range of funding schemes and programmes to support the provision of youth services to young people throughout the country including those from disadvantaged communities. The funding schemes support national and local youth work involving approximately 1,400 youth work staff working in youth services and communities throughout the country.

The current allocated funding for the youth sector in 2019 is €60.395m; this represents a 2.5% increase on the 2018 allocation. An increase of 4.5% in the budget for the youth sector would result in an overall allocation of €63.113m; this would be a €2.7m difference from the current allocation.

As the Deputy is aware my Department is currently managing the most significant reform of youth services ever undertaken. This will provide an opportunity to identify need and to focus funding on young people most in need of intervention.

Future development and investment in youth services will be informed by the mapping exercise completed in 2017, which mapped youth service provision across the State as well as an Area Profiling, Needs Assessment and Service Requirement tool which was designed in collaboration with the Education and Training Board (ETB) sector and was officially launched in January 2019. This mapping and tool will assist the Department and the relevant ETBs in developing a detailed social demographic profile in terms of both population numbers and deprivation levels. My Department is committed to working with ETBs to identify requirements in their area and facilitate decisions on service requirement by reference to evidenced need.

Domestic Violence Services Funding

Questions (690)

Mary Lou McDonald

Question:

690. Deputy Mary Lou McDonald asked the Minister for Children and Youth Affairs the funding provided to domestic and gender-based violence organisations in each of the years 2016 to 2018 and to date in 2019, by organisation in tabular form. [26635/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Children)

Tusla, the Child and Family Agency provides funding and coordination supports to some 59 organisations that deliver a range of services to victims of domestic, sexual and gender based violence throughout the country.

In 2019, €25.3 million is being allocated to Domestic, Sexual and Gender Based Violence services, an increase of €1.5 million over 2018.

I have requested Tusla to respond directly to the Deputy on the matters raised with regard to funding for individual organisations within the specified time period.

Departmental Funding

Questions (691)

Mattie McGrath

Question:

691. Deputy Mattie McGrath asked the Minister for Children and Youth Affairs the recipients of the funding allocated under the network support fund announced in November 2018; and if she will make a statement on the matter. [26681/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Children)

What Works (formerly QCBI) is a Department of Children and Youth Affairs initiative which aims to maximise the impact of prevention and early intervention to improve the lives of children and young people. What Works will ensure that key groups working with children, young people and their families know what works, how it works, and it will provide an evidence supported approach to apply to this work.

What Works focuses on enhancing key areas as they relate to children and young people’s services:

- Data and Evidence,

- Capacity,

- and Quality in Prevention and Early Intervention policy, service and practice.

The What Works Network Support Fund announced in November 2018 aims to support organisations promoting evidence informed approaches to prevention and early intervention services, so that those working with and for children, young people and their families are supported in doing the right things, in the right way and at the right time. Subject to funding availability, this funding scheme will be open to applications until 5 November 2019 and awards will be announced on a rolling basis.

To date some €260,000 has been awarded to successful applicants under the What Works Network Support Fund. The recipients of funding thus far are listed below in tabular form for each of the years 2018 and 2019.

2018

Organisation

Amount Awarded

County

GOSHH Ireland CLG

2,000.00

Co Limerick

Prevention and Early Intervention Network (PEIN)

2,000.00

Co Dublin

Cavan County Childcare Committee CLG

1,600.00

Co Cavan

Total amount approved for funding 2018:

5,600.00

2019

Organisation

Amount Awarded

County

Breaking Through Company Limited by Guarantee

13,200.00

Co Kildare

Cavan County Council Arts Office

20,000.00

Co Cavan

CASP CSMT

9,000.00

Co Limerick

DESSA (Disability Equality Specialist Support)

5,704.00

Co Dublin (for CYPSCS Donegal)

Barnardos Cork

7,475.00

Co Cork

Tusla (on behalf of Limerick CYPSC)

20,000.00

Co Limerick

Children in Hospital Ireland

18,000.00

Co Dublin

The Social and Health Education Project CLG

20,000.00

Co Cork

GOSHH Ireland CLG

10,000.00

Co Limerick

Children's Grief Centre

10,000.00

Co Limerick

The Parenting Network

20,000.00

Co Dublin

Sligo Family Support CLG

15,000.00

Co Sligo

Limerick Youth Service (on behalf of West Limerick Youth and Community Workers Network (WLYCWN)

2,629.00

Co Limerick

Ballymun Network for Assisting Children & Young People (BNACYP) (Ballymun Local Drugs & Alcohol Task Force)

8,400.00

Co Dublin

Children's Research Network (Trinity College Dublin)

13,350.00

Co Dublin

Health Service Executive Dublin North City and County Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service Occupational Therapy Department

20,000.00

Co Dublin

Kerry CYPSC

13,000.00

Co Kerry

Prevention and Early Intervention Network

20,000.00

Co Dublin

National Forum of Family Resource Centres

10,000.00

Dublin

Venture Out Wilderness Project CLG

5,000.00

Galway

Total amount awarded for funding 2019:

260,758.00

Freedom of Information Data

Questions (692)

Jonathan O'Brien

Question:

692. Deputy Jonathan O'Brien asked the Minister for Rural and Community Development the number of freedom of information requests granted, part granted, refused, transferred to an appropriate body, withdrawn or handled outside freedom of information in 2018, in tabular form. [26398/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Rural)

My Department received a total of 58 requests in 2018. Two requests were carried forward from the previous year, while three requests were carried forward into 2019, leaving a total of 57 completed requests in 2018.

Those cases were decided as follows:

Status

No.

Granted

14

Part-Granted

12

Refused

13

Withdrawn

6

Handled outside FOI

12

Total

57

Departmental Funding

Questions (693)

Thomas P. Broughan

Question:

693. Deputy Thomas P. Broughan asked the Minister for Rural and Community Development if supports are available to a community service (details supplied) that is in urgent need of a more adequate building; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [26542/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Rural)

My Department provides a range of supports to communities and community centres nationwide, in both urban and rural areas, by helping citizens to participate in the development of their communities and by providing funding to improve facilities.

In addition, the Community Enhancement Programme can contribute towards the renovation of community centres. My Department also provides funding under the LEADER programme, which can support the development of Community Centres outside of the five main cities.

Separately, once a Community Centre is in place, the Community Services Programme supports community businesses to provide local services and create employment opportunities for disadvantaged people. Where an application is successful under the programme, my Department can provide a contribution to the cost of a manager and an agreed number of full-time equivalent positions.

Rural Regeneration and Development Fund

Questions (694)

Éamon Ó Cuív

Question:

694. Deputy Éamon Ó Cuív asked the Minister for Rural and Community Development the amount drawn down to date under the new rural regeneration scheme; the projects that have received funding to date; the amount in each case; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [26545/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Rural)

The first call for applications for the Rural Regeneration and Development Fund closed at the end of September 2019. €1 billion is committed to the Fund over a 10 year period to support rural economic development and help build strong communities. €315m is allocated to the Fund for 2019-2022.

In November 2018 and February 2019 I announced details of a total of 38 Category 1 projects (capital projects which were fully planning and consent ready) and 46 Category 2 projects (those needing further development to make them ready for delivery) which were successful under the first call from the Fund, providing €86m in support for projects worth a total of €117m.

Following the announcement of the 84 successful projects, my Department engaged with each lead party to complete required due diligence and enter into contractual arrangements whereby project payments are phased in line with delivery.

Significant progress is already being made on the 38 Category 1 projects with many completing procurement. A number of the projects have already met their first milestone and funding has been released.

To date, a total of €420,881.84 has been drawn down from the Fund. This number will significantly increase over the coming weeks and months as procurement phases end across the 84 projects and construction gets underway in Category 1 projects and detailed planning begins in Category 2 projects.

In conclusion, details are set out in the table below of the amounts paid out to date by my Department from the Fund. It should be noted that this does not include claims made but not yet paid by my Department.

Project Name

Lead Applicant

Drawdown from the RRDF

Community Shops Kilkenny

Kilkenny LEADER Partnership

€6,381.84

GTeic Hub An Spidéal

Údarás na Gaeltachta

€173,000.00

Banteer Amenity Project

IRD Duhallow CLG

€180,000.00

Blackwater River Valley

Waterford LEADER Partnership

€61,500.00

Community Services Programme

Questions (695)

Martin Heydon

Question:

695. Deputy Martin Heydon asked the Minister for Rural and Community Development the status of the community services programme; when it is expected to open; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [26778/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Rural)

The Community Services Programme (CSP) supports around 400 community organisations to provide local services through a social enterprise model, with funding provided as a contribution to the cost of a manager and an agreed number of full-time equivalent (FTE) positions. More than €46 million is available through the programme in 2019.

The CSP currently co-funds the salaries of some 1,660 FTEs and 300 manager posts in community organisations. Between part-time and full-time positions, the CSP will support around 3,000 people this year.

My Department commenced a review of the CSP earlier this year. The review is examining how the programme fits with overall Government priorities, as well as with my Department’s other community programmes and policy objectives, and will help inform decisions on the future shape and structure of the programme.

The review is being carried out by an independent reviewer, Indecon Consultants. The reviewer has commenced consultation with key stakeholders, including all CSP supported organisations. The review will take six months to complete, with a final report expected in early Autumn 2019.

I am committed to continuing the CSP beyond 2019 and the recommendations from the review will shape the programme going forward. In the meantime, my Department continues to accept expressions of interest from organisations, with funding for new organisations considered in light of available budgets during the year.

Civil Registration Service

Questions (696)

Darragh O'Brien

Question:

696. Deputy Darragh O'Brien asked the Minister for Employment Affairs and Social Protection the way in which a person can become solemnisers, non-religious affiliated to the State, solemnisers for the public for both marriages and funerals and be in compliance with civil ceremony requirements; and if she will make a statement on the matter. [26426/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Employment)

To become a registered solemniser a person must have an application made on their behalf, by an authorised body, to have that person added to the Register of Solemnisers. Section 45 of the Civil Registration Act 2004 defines the bodies that are permitted to apply to have persons added to the Register of Solemnisers. This section was amended by section 2 of the Civil Registration (Amendment) Act 2012 (CRAA 2012), to allow a secular body to make such an application. The full list of bodies that are permitted to make an application are: the Health Service Executive, a religious body, or a secular body.

Section 3 of CRAA 2012 defines a body as a secular body if it is an organised group of people and-

(a) it has not fewer than 50 members,

(b) its principal objects are secular, ethical and humanist,

(c) members of the body meet regularly in relation to their beliefs and in furtherance of the objects referred to in paragraph (b),

(d) it does not have any rules regarding marriage or the solemnisation of marriages that contravene the requirements of this Act or any other enactment or rule of law,

(e) it is shown to the satisfaction of an tArd-Chláraitheoir to be a body that has appropriate procedures in writing for selecting, training and accrediting members as fit and proper persons to solemnise marriages,

(f) it is a body that, on the date of its making of an application under section 54 or 57, has been in existence for a continuous period of not less than 5 years,

(g) it is a body-

(i) that is entitled to an exemption under section 207 or 208 of the Taxes Consolidation Act 1997, and was so entitled for a continuous period of not less than five years immediately preceding the date of the body's most recent application under section 54 or 57, and

(ii) in respect of which-

(I) a number (commonly referred to as a CHY number) stands issued by the Revenue Commissioners for the purposes of that exemption, and

(II) that number stood issued for a continuous period of not less than 5 years immediately preceding the date of its most recent application under section 54 or 57,

(h) it is a body that does not have the making of profit as one of its principal objects, and

(i) it maintains a register of its members.

The Register of Solemnisers is established for the purpose of solemnising marriage ceremonies only. There are no civil registration requirements for conducting funeral services.