Health Services Funding

Questions (1980)

Bobby Aylward

Question:

1980. Deputy Bobby Aylward asked the Minister for Health if appropriate funding will be sought in budget 2020 for the provision of community supports and home care for persons living with dementia following a call by an organisation (details supplied) for investment of €18 million to be put directly into such services; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [34474/19]

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Written answers (Question to Health)

The aim of the National Dementia Strategy, which was published in December 2014 and is being implemented by the National Dementia Office, is to improve care, services and supports for people with dementia.

The HSE currently provides about €9 million per annum for intensive home care packages, including €7.9 million for dementia-specific packages. Since the packages were introduced at the end of 2014, 443 dementia-specific intensive homecare packages have been delivered, with 201 active at the end of March 2019.

A total of €426 million has been allocated for home support services in 2019, which also benefit people with dementia. Over 17.9 million home support hours are expected to be delivered to over 53,000 people this year.

The HSE provides in the region of €12 million in annual funding to a range of organisations who deliver dementia-specific respite, home care, day care, cognitive stimulation therapy, social clubs and supports for family carers around the country. In addition, the HSE provides €400,000 per annum to support the Dementia Adviser Service which spans 12 counties and is operated by the Alzheimer Society of Ireland. This funding supports 7 of the 9 dementia adviser posts delivering the service.

The level of funding available for the Department of Health in 2020 and the quantum of services to be provided by the HSE, including for proposals to enhance dementia services, will be considered as part of the national Estimates and budgetary process and National Service Planning.

Disabilities Assessments

Questions (1981, 1982, 1987, 1988)

John Brady

Question:

1981. Deputy John Brady asked the Minister for Health the number of children in community healthcare organisation 6, CHO6, by municipal district or local electoral area, LEA, on the waiting list for an assessment of needs; the expected waiting time for a child being put on the waiting lists at July 2019; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [34485/19]

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John Brady

Question:

1982. Deputy John Brady asked the Minister for Health the number of children with autism registered with the HSE with an address in the Bray municipal district area; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [34486/19]

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John Brady

Question:

1987. Deputy John Brady asked the Minister for Health the number of children in CHO 6 by municipal district or LEA on the waiting list for an assessment of needs; the expected waiting time for a child being put on the waiting lists as of July 2019; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [34499/19]

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John Brady

Question:

1988. Deputy John Brady asked the Minister for Health the number of children with autism registered with the HSE with an address in the Bray municipal district area; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [34500/19]

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Written answers (Question to Health)

I propose to take Questions Nos. 1981, 1982, 1987 and 1988 together.

The Government is committed to providing services and supports for people with disabilities which will empower them to live independent lives, provide greater independence in accessing the services they choose, and enhance their ability to tailor the supports required to meet their needs and plan their lives. This commitment is outlined in the Programme for Partnership Government, which is guided by two principles: equality of opportunity and improving the quality of life for people with disabilities.

As the Deputy's question relates to service matters, I have arranged for the question to be referred to the Health Service Executive (HSE) for direct reply to the Deputy.

Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services Data

Questions (1983)

John Brady

Question:

1983. Deputy John Brady asked the Minister for Health the waiting times for child and adolescent mental health services in County Wicklow by service provider; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [34487/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Health)

As this is a service matter I have asked the Health Service Executive to respond directly to the Deputy as soon as possible.

Home Help Service Data

Questions (1984)

John Brady

Question:

1984. Deputy John Brady asked the Minister for Health the number on the waiting list for home help hours in County Wicklow by municipal district or local electoral area, LEA, in tabular form; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [34488/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Health)

As this is a service matter I have asked the Health Service Executive to respond directly to the Deputy as soon as possible.

Mental Health Services Data

Questions (1985)

John Brady

Question:

1985. Deputy John Brady asked the Minister for Health the number waiting for adult mental health services in the Bray municipal district or local electoral area, LEA; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [34489/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Health)

As this is a service matter I have asked the Health Service Executive to respond directly to the Deputy as soon as possible.

Primary Care Centres Data

Questions Nos. 1987 and 1988 answered with Question No. 1981.

Questions (1986)

John Brady

Question:

1986. Deputy John Brady asked the Minister for Health the expected whole-time equivalent number of new staff who will be employed to work in the Bray primary care centre; the services that will be provided in the centre; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [34490/19]

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Written answers (Question to Health)

As the HSE has responsibility for the provision, along with the maintenance and operation of Primary Care Centres and other Primary Care facilities, the Executive has been asked to reply directly to the Deputy.

Questions Nos. 1987 and 1988 answered with Question No. 1981.

Mental Health Services Data

Questions (1989)

James Browne

Question:

1989. Deputy James Browne asked the Minister for Health the number of psychiatry of later life teams in place. [34505/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Health)

As this is a service matter I have asked the Health Service Executive to respond directly to the Deputy as soon as possible.

Hospitals Policy

Questions (1990)

Thomas P. Broughan

Question:

1990. Deputy Thomas P. Broughan asked the Minister for Health his plans to publish the de Buitléir report on the process of removing private medical work from the public health system; his views on whether a recent decision on private work facilities at the national children’s hospital undermines the process; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [34512/19]

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Written answers (Question to Health)

I intend to publish the Report of the Independent Review Group established to examine private activity in public hospitals (the De Buitléir Report) in the coming weeks. The Deputy should note that consideration of the Report is ongoing and the Government has not yet made any decision relating to the recommendations contained therein.

Consultants holding specific contracts under the Consultants' Contract 2008 are entitled to engage in private outpatient activity outside of their public commitment. Under the terms of this employment contract, this outpatient activity must be conducted in the hospital they are contracted with and the employer (i.e the HSE or hospital) is obliged to provide the facility where this activity is conducted. As a result, private outpatient clinics may be held on the public hospital campus. Statutory and voluntary hospitals, including the new National Children's Hospital, are obliged to provide facilities for consultants holding such contracts. This position remains the case under the current legal contract framework.

Hospitals Policy

Questions (1991)

Róisín Shortall

Question:

1991. Deputy Róisín Shortall asked the Minister for Health the reason for the delay in publishing the de Buitléir report on the removal of private work from public hospitals; if he will publish this without further delay; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [34516/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Health)

I intend to publish the Report of the Independent Review Group established to examine private activity in public hospitals (the De Buitléir Report) in the coming weeks. The Deputy should note that consideration of the Report is ongoing and the Government has not yet made any decision relating to the recommendations contained therein.

Hospital Staff Recruitment

Questions (1992)

Róisín Shortall

Question:

1992. Deputy Róisín Shortall asked the Minister for Health the reason for the delay in publishing the Murray report on hospital doctor recruitment; and if he will publish this without further delay. [34517/19]

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Written answers (Question to Health)

The Report of the NDTP Project Team on the Employment of Consultants Not Registered in the Specialist Division of the Register of Medical Practitioners (the Murray Report) is one of a number of Appendices to correspondence received from the HSE on 13 May setting out its proposals to address medical recruitment difficulties and related patient safety concerns. It was prepared as part of the HSE's response to requests I and my Department made asking that it address issues raised by the President of the High Court, Justice Kelly, concerning doctors being appointed to consultant posts who were not on the Specialist Register and broader medical recruitment challenges and associated patient safety concerns.

There is no delay in publishing this Report. It was received on 13th May 2019 and is currently receiving consideration. It is focused on doctors who are filling consultant posts though not on the Specialist Register. The HSE has advised that a further report on 'non-training scheme doctors' who constitute a much larger number will be completed in the coming months. The correspondence advised that the HSE is developing terms of reference for a Medical Workforce and Patient Safety Oversight Group supported by a project team to agree and oversee implementation of actions in relation to the following priority areas:

1. Doctors employed by the HSE who are not on the Specialist Register,

2. Non-Training Scheme NCHDs

3. The recruitment process for NCHDs

4. The recruitment process for consultants

5. Retention of consultants and NCHDs, and

6. The configuration of services that will best support the recruitment and retention of consultants and NCHDs, facilitate their training requirements and other needs.

Medicinal Products Prices

Questions (1993)

Róisín Shortall

Question:

1993. Deputy Róisín Shortall asked the Minister for Health the specific action he is taking to reduce the high drugs bill and the fact that the cost of medicines here is higher than in most EU countries; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [34518/19]

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Written answers (Question to Health)

As the Deputy is aware, the Oireachtas put in place a robust legal framework, in the Health (Pricing and Supply of Medical Goods) Act 2013, to give full statutory powers to the HSE to assess and make decisions on reimbursement of medicines, taking account of a range of objective factors and expert opinion as appropriate. These include the clinical and cost effectiveness of the product, the opportunity cost, the potential or actual budget impact, and the impact on resources that are available to the HSE.

By thoroughly assessing medicines in this manner, we help ensure that the finite resources of our heath service are used in the most effective manner. This process can lead to protracted negotiations with pharmaceutical companies but is necessary to ensure that the HSE can provide access to as many new innovative treatments as possible to patients in Ireland.

My Department and the HSE are working on making greater efficiencies in medicines usage through a range of initiatives both internationally and domestically to ensure the greatest possible access to new treatments for patients in Ireland.

These new measures are expected to complement existing cost control initiatives which are being undertaken by the HSE under the auspices of the Medicines Management Programme. Among the initiatives already being pursued are improvement in practices for the procurement of drugs in hospitals and the designation of preferred products, with a focus on high cost prescribing areas.

The HSE is also strengthening its pharmacy resourcing capacity in order to target particular areas, such as biosimilars. To date substantial progress has been achieved in increasingly biosimilar prescribing rates in acute hospitals. The HSE is working on identifying barriers to the prescribing of biosimilars with a specific focus on education and supports. It is seeking to increase understanding of biosimilars through targeted presentations to clinicians and hospitals.

In spite of significant progress on drug costs achieved from reference pricing and the price reductions under the IPHA Agreement, the Health Service is still facing significant challenges in relation to the affordability of medicines – mainly related to the emergence of increasing numbers of very expensive products, particularly in the high-tech medicines area.

In that regard, I and officials have been engaging over the past number of years, with a number of voluntary EU forums. In June 2018, I signed the Beneluxa Initiative on Pharmaceutical Policy. This Agreement is in line with my objective to work with other European countries to identify workable solutions, in an increasingly challenging environment, to secure timely access for patients to new medicines in an affordable and sustainable way. Members of the Beneluxa Initiative will work closely together to identify pragmatic solutions to the challenges which we all now face with medicine pricing, sustainability and supply.

Orthodontic Services

Questions (1994)

Róisín Shortall

Question:

1994. Deputy Róisín Shortall asked the Minister for Health if a review of cases in which children had been damaged by the HSE orthodontic services in Dublin-mid-Leinster has been carried out at the request of the HSE by persons (details supplied); if the review was submitted to the HSE by them on 6 February 2015; and if he will ensure that the HSE publishes the review without further delay. [34519/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Health)

As this is a service matter it has been referred to the HSE for attention and direct reply to the Deputy.

Open Disclosures Policy

Questions (1995)

Róisín Shortall

Question:

1995. Deputy Róisín Shortall asked the Minister for Health his plans and the timescale for addressing the issue of open disclosure within the health service. [34521/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Health)

The Department of Health is committed to driving openness and transparency to ensure patient safety. I believe that all staff must be open and honest with patients. Patient safety is fundamental to the delivery of quality healthcare and to public confidence in the health system, and open disclosure is an integral element of patient safety incident management and learning.

Patient Safety Legislation Programme

In line with international best practice, the Department has been driving a progressive legislative framework to build an open and just culture for patient safety which balances the need for an open and honest reporting culture that facilitates a learning environment, and quality healthcare with accountability for both individuals and organisations. Disclosure and reporting are opportunities to learn, to improve, to address errors that have happened and to apply the lessons to make the service safer for the next patient and the patient after that.

Civil Liability (Amendment) Act 2017

Part 4 of the Civil Liability (Amendment) Act 2017 provides the process and procedures for voluntary open disclosure. The Act of 2017 covers the open disclosure of all patient safety incidents, unintended and unanticipated, including near misses. It provides provisions to create a safe space for staff to be open and transparent with patients in order that they would be given as much information as possible, as early as possible, including an apology where appropriate. The Commencement of Part 4 of the Act of 2017 and the Civil Liability (Open Disclosure) (Prescribed Statements) Regulations 2018, came into effect on 23 September 2018.

Patient Safety Bill

During the Report Stage debate of these provisions, I also committed to examining how legislation could be expedited to provide for mandatory open disclosure to patients of serious incidents. The general scheme for the Patient Safety Bill approved by Government on 5 July 2018, provides the legislative framework for a number of important patient safety issues, including: mandatory open disclosure of a list of serious patient safety incidents and the notification of same externally to the Health Information and Quality Authority and the Mental Health Commission to contribute to national learning and system wide improvements. The Bill will also contain provisions in relation to clinical audit and the extension of the Health Information Quality Authority's remit to private hospitals.

The Bill is part of the broader programme of legislative changes and policy initiatives being taken by the Department so as to improve the ability of the health service to anticipate, identify, respond to and manage patient safety issues. Creating a culture of open disclosure and learning from the things that go wrong is the bedrock of making services safer.

The general scheme of the Patient Safety Bill underwent pre-legislative scrutiny at the Oireachtas Joint Committee on Health on the 26 September 2018. The Bill will build on the foundations provided for by the Houses of the Oireachtas in relation to open disclosure as set out in the Civil Liability (Amendment) Act 2017. Officials of my Department and the Office of the Parliamentary Counsel are continuing to progress this legislation. It is intended that the Patient Safety Bill will be introduced in the Autumn Dáil session.

In addition, in June 2019 the HSE published their revised Interim Open Disclosure Policy in line with the recommendations from the:

- Scoping Inquiry into CervicalCheck Screening Programme (Scally 2018);

- Part 4 of the Civil Liability (Amendment) Act 2017 and the Civil Liability (Open Disclosure) (Prescribed Statements) Regulations 2018;

- Assisted Decision Making (Capacity) Act 2015;

- National Standards of the Conduct of Reviews of Patient Safety Incidents (Mental Health Commission and Health Information and Quality Authority 2017), and

- Incident Management Framework (HSE 2018).

The policy update has incorporated learning to date from the roll out of the 2013 open disclosure programme nationally.

The Department has also funded the establishment of the National Open Disclosure Office within the HSE, which has been set up to provide strategic governance and oversight for the HSE on the implementation of (i) the HSE Open Disclosure Policy and accompanying guidelines, (ii) Part 4 of the Civil Liability (Amendment) Act 2017, (iii) the Civil Liability (Open Disclosure) (Prescribed Statements) Regulations 2018 and (iv) the provisions relating to open disclosure within the forthcoming Patient Safety Bill. The function of this office is to:

- Support health and social care services and staff in the implementation of open disclosure.

- Support compliance with the stated policy, guidelines and legislation

- Provide and support on-going education and training programmes on open disclosure.

- Disseminate evidence based open disclosure resources and tools.

- Support systematic reviews of policies and practice to enable compliance with open disclosure.

- Ensure service user and patient involvement throughout all aspects of the work.

Independent Patient Safety Council

In addition, the Department will is in the process of establishing a new Independent Patient Safety Council. The first task of the Council will be to undertake a detailed review of the existing policies on Open Disclosure across the whole healthcare landscape. The resulting policy will have legislative underpinning. It also will operate across the whole health service and its implementation will in turn be overseen by the Independent Patient Safety Council. The Independent Patient Safety Council will include strong patient and public representation and international patient safety expertise.

Hospital Waiting Lists Action Plans

Questions (1996)

Róisín Shortall

Question:

1996. Deputy Róisín Shortall asked the Minister for Health the actions being taken to improve waiting times for the almost 30,000 women waiting for an outpatient appointment to see a gynaecologist; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [34524/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Health)

Reducing waiting time for patients for hospital operations and procedures is a key priority for Government. In this regard, the Government is committed to improving waiting times for hospital appointments and procedures.

The latest National Treatment Purchase Fund (NTPF) figures show that there are 29,059 patients on the Gynaecology Outpatient waiting list. Of these 82% (23,762) are waiting 12 months or less.

A key element of the Plan is the stabilisation of the Outpatient Waiting List. Under the Plan the HSE, in line with the National Service Plan, will aim to deliver 3.3 million outpatient appointments, of which approximately 1 million will be first appointments. For its part the NTPF will aim to deliver 40,000 first Outpatient appointments.

The NTPF advise that over recent months they have placed a particular focus on engaging with hospital groups and individual hospitals to identify waiting list proposals. The NTPF welcomes proposals from all acute hospitals for initiatives to improve access for patients on waiting lists.

In addition, my Department is working with the HSE and NTPF, under the Access Plan, with the objective of developing medium-long term improvement initiatives for patient access to hospital procedures. Issues relating to gynaecology waiting lists will be examined as part of this process.

Hospital Appointments Status

Questions (1997)

Robert Troy

Question:

1997. Deputy Robert Troy asked the Minister for Health if a date for heart surgery for a person (details supplied) will be expedited. [34526/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Health)

Under the Health Act 2004, the Health Service Executive (HSE) is required to manage and deliver, or arrange to be delivered on its behalf, health and personal social services. Section 6 of the HSE Governance Act 2013 bars the Minister for Health from directing the HSE to provide a treatment or a personal service to any individual or to confer eligibility on any individual.

The National Waiting List Management Policy, a standardised approach to managing scheduled care treatment for in-patient, day case and planned procedures, since January 2014, has been developed to ensure that all administrative, managerial and clinical staff follow an agreed national minimum standard for the management and administration of waiting lists for scheduled care. This policy, which has been adopted by the HSE, sets out the processes that hospitals are to implement to manage waiting lists.

In relation to the particular query raised, as this is a service matter, I have asked the HSE to respond to the Deputy directly.

Medical Card Applications

Questions (1998)

Danny Healy-Rae

Question:

1998. Deputy Danny Healy-Rae asked the Minister for Health if medical card applications can be backdated to the date of applying especially for persons who are diagnosed with serious illnesses and find themselves not able to work and with very high medical expenses; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [34530/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Health)

As the Deputy will be aware the medical card assessment process is based primarily on a financial assessment and not medical need. The HSE is required to conduct an assessment of an individual's financial circumstances to determine if an individual meets the eligibility requirements before a medical card may be granted. The medical card therefore will only come into effect from the date of approval by the HSE.

It should be noted that where particular medical costs arise in advance of any medical card being issued other supports are available to individuals to assist in the cost of medical care. If an individual has registered for the Drugs Payment Scheme he/she will only be required to pay for medication costs up to the value of €124 per month. In addition tax relief on medical expenses that an individual pays for oneself or on behalf of any other person may also be claimed.

It is noted that the HSE can in very particular circumstances issue an emergency medical card for persons in need of urgent or on-going medical care that they cannot afford and for persons in palliative care who are terminally ill. These medical cards are issued within 24 hours of receipt of the required patient details and a letter which confirms the medical condition from a doctor or consultant. With the exception of terminally ill patients, all medical cards, granted on an emergency basis, are followed up with a full application within a number of weeks.

Hospital Appointments Status

Questions (1999)

Aindrias Moynihan

Question:

1999. Deputy Aindrias Moynihan asked the Minister for Health when a person (details supplied) will be scheduled for a cataract operation; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [34535/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Health)

Under the Health Act 2004, the Health Service Executive (HSE) is required to manage and deliver, or arrange to be delivered on its behalf, health and personal social services. Section 6 of the HSE Governance Act 2013 bars the Minister for Health from directing the HSE to provide a treatment or a personal service to any individual or to confer eligibility on any individual.

The National Waiting List Management Policy, a standardised approach to managing scheduled care treatment for in-patient, day case and planned procedures, since January 2014, has been developed to ensure that all administrative, managerial and clinical staff follow an agreed national minimum standard for the management and administration of waiting lists for scheduled care. This policy, which has been adopted by the HSE, sets out the processes that hospitals are to implement to manage waiting lists.

In relation to the particular query raised, as this is a service matter, I have asked the HSE to respond to the Deputy directly.

Health Services Data

Questions (2000)

Aindrias Moynihan

Question:

2000. Deputy Aindrias Moynihan asked the Minister for Health the number of persons who have been added to the waiting list for cataract operations in counties Cork and Kerry in the past year; the number who were removed from the waiting list; the number from the waiting list whom the HSE treated in 2018; the extent of use of the National Treatment Purchase Fund, NTPF, for their treatment; the number of persons from counties Cork and Kerry who availed of the cross-border directive for cataract treatment in 2018; the number of persons the HSE were notified of who had died while waiting for cataract operations; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [34540/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Health)

Reducing waiting time for patients for hospital operations and procedures is a key priority for Government. In this regard, the Government is committed to improving waiting times for hospital appointments and procedures.

Budget 2019 announced that the Government has further increased investment in tackling waiting lists, with funding to the National Treatment Purchase Fund (NTPF) increasing from €55 million in 2018 to €75 million in 2019. The joint Department of Health/HSE/NTPF Scheduled Care Access Plan 2019 was published in March and sets out measures to improve care for patients waiting for scheduled care in 2019 by reducing waiting times for inpatient/day case treatment and outpatient appointments. The plan places a strong focus on ten high-volume Inpatient/Day Case procedures, including cataracts. When combined with HSE activity, it is projected that the NTPF will be in a position to offer treatment to all clinically suitable patients waiting more than 6 months for one of these high-volume procedures.

At the end of July 2017, the number of people waiting for a cataract procedure was 10,024. Under the Inpatient Day Case Access Plan 2018, Cataracts were one of the specialties targeted by the NTPF, and by end December 2018, the number of patients waiting had fallen to 6,440, a reduction of 36%. The number of patients waiting for a Cataract procedure at the end of June 2019 had further reduced to 5,739, with 454 of patients waiting over 9 months. This represents a reduction of 3,917 or 89% when compared to July 2017, when there were 4,371 patients waiting over 9 months for a cataract operation.

In relation to the number of persons added to the waiting list, the information requested by the Deputy is currently being collated by officials in my Department and will be provided to the Deputy directly as soon as it becomes available.

In relation to the following matters raised – the number of persons removed from the waiting list; the number from the waiting list treated by the HSE; the number of persons from Cork and Kerry that availed of the cross border directive for cataract treatment in 2018 and the number of persons the HSE were notified of that dies while waiting for cataract operations; I have asked the HSE to respond directly to the Deputy.

Orthodontic Services Data

Questions (2001, 2002)

Aindrias Moynihan

Question:

2001. Deputy Aindrias Moynihan asked the Minister for Health the number of orthopaedic treatments carried out nationally by month, over the past year, in tabular form; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [34550/19]

View answer

Aindrias Moynihan

Question:

2002. Deputy Aindrias Moynihan asked the Minister for Health the number of orthopaedic treatments carried out in County Cork by month, over the past year, in tabular form; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [34551/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Health)

I propose to take Questions Nos. 2001 and 2002 together.

Reducing waiting time for patients for hospital operations and procedures is a key priority for Government. In this regard, the Government is committed to improving waiting times for hospital appointments and procedures.

Budget 2019 announced that the Government has further increased investment in tackling waiting lists, with funding to the National Treatment Purchase Fund (NTPF) increasing from €55 million in 2018 to €75 million in 2019. The joint Department of Health/HSE/NTPF Scheduled Care Access Plan 2019 was published in March and sets out measures to improve care for patients waiting for scheduled care in 2019 by reducing waiting times for inpatient/day case treatment and outpatient appointments. The plan places a strong focus on ten high-volume Inpatient/Day Case procedures, including hip/knee replacements. When combined with HSE activity, it is projected that the NTPF will be in a position to offer treatment to all clinically suitable patients waiting more than 6 months for one of these high-volume procedures.

The NTPF advise that over recent months they have placed a particular focus on engaging with hospital groups and individual hospitals to identify waiting list proposals. The NTPF welcomes proposals from all acute hospitals for initiatives to improve access for patients on waiting lists.

In relation to the particular queries raised, I have asked the HSE to respond to the Deputy directly.

Medical Card Data

Questions (2003)

Aindrias Moynihan

Question:

2003. Deputy Aindrias Moynihan asked the Minister for Health the number of medical cards issued nationally by month over the past year in tabular form; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [34552/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Health)

As this is a service matter, it has been referred to the Health Service Executive for attention and direct reply to the Deputy.

Medical Card Data

Questions (2004)

Aindrias Moynihan

Question:

2004. Deputy Aindrias Moynihan asked the Minister for Health the number of medical cards issued in County Cork by month over the past year in tabular form; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [34553/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Health)

As this is a service matter, it has been referred to the Health Service Executive for attention and direct reply to the Deputy