Census of Population Publication

Questions (6)

Catherine Murphy

Question:

6. Deputy Catherine Murphy asked the Taoiseach the rules regarding the duration of time that must pass before genealogical records can be made publicly available; the statutory basis for the rules; the way in which this rule was applied in the case of the release of the 1911 census records; and when it is planned to release the 1926 census records. [33853/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Taoiseach)

Sections 33 and 35 of the Statistics Act 1993 prevent the release of census forms until 100 years after the date of the relevant census for reasons of confidentiality.

The 1901 and 1911 census records were taken under the supervision of the Registrar of Births, Deaths, and Marriages and were not subject to the Statistics Acts of 1926 and 1993.

The Censuses of Population held between 1926 and 1991 inclusive were carried out under the 1926 Statistics Act which did not permit any access to Census records, at any time. However, the 1993 Statistics Act repealed the 1926 and 1946 Statistics Acts and provided for the release of Census forms for these Censuses 100 years after the date of the relevant Census. This retrospective introduction of the 100 years exemption was seen by some as undermining the original guarantee given to householders. However it was generally accepted that 100 years was a reasonable compromise in all the circumstances, including having regard to increasing life expectancy.

Under the Statistics Act, 1993, the 1926 Census cannot be made available for public release until the end of the statute period in 2026.

State Bodies

Questions (7)

Seán Fleming

Question:

7. Deputy Sean Fleming asked the Taoiseach the organisations that are included on the State balance sheet and organisations in which EUROSTAT has given an indication that such organisations should be included on the State balance sheet. [34334/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Taoiseach)

Under EU legislation the Central Statistics Office (CSO) is responsible for the official reporting of Ireland’s General Government Deficit/Balance (GGDeficit/GGB), Debt (GGDebt) and other Government Finance Statistics (GFS) related to the Excessive Deficit Procedure (EDP). In particular, this requires the CSO to define the General Government Sector in Ireland. In fulfilment of this requirement the CSO maintains and publishes a Register of Public Sector Bodies in Ireland which is available at: https://www.cso.ie/en/methods/governmentaccounts/classificationdecisions/registerofpublicsectorbodiesinireland/.

This register includes a listing of bodies that are classified in the general government sector. As a result, these bodies’ revenue, expenditure and financial balance sheet data are included in the EDP notification reported by the CSO biannually in March and September to Eurostat and published nationally.

As the Deputy can appreciate, the composition of the register is not static, as Government controlled bodies are established, closed and merged over time. In addition, the market/non-market status of bodies must be continually reviewed. Consequently, the Register of Public Sector Bodies is reviewed and up-dated periodically (at least on an annual basis). This is done primarily through a combination of surveying all central government departments and local authorities, supplemented by independent research by the CSO.

The CSO also includes a section on updates to the register each time it is published. In addition, since 2015, the outcomes of significant classification reviews have also been published on the CSO website at https://www.cso.ie/en/methods/governmentaccounts/classificationdecisions/.

Finally, Eurostat advice to Member States on classification and other methodological issues are published on line at https://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/web/government-finance-statistics/methodology/advice-to-member-states. The latest advice published for Ireland was on the classification of Tier 3 Approved Housing Bodies in 2018.

Cross-Border Economic Data

Questions (8)

Robert Troy

Question:

8. Deputy Robert Troy asked the Taoiseach the latest economic and jobs data regarding cross-Border trade; the estimated number of employees that cross the Border daily to work in each jurisdiction; the value of same to the local economies; and the number of small businesses that have cross-Border trade in each jurisdiction. [34637/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Taoiseach)

The Central Statistics Office (CSO) published a report at the end of 2016 on “Brexit: Ireland and the UK in Numbers” and has kept key indicators from that report regularly updated in an interactive zone on the CSO website. The 2016 report included detailed tables under the headings of people, business, trade, tourism and transport.

The interactive indicators include key tables on trade in goods, trade in services, employment, migration, and outbound and inbound tourism.

The interactive tables on Ireland and the UK in numbers are available at: https://www.cso.ie/en/interactivezone/visualisationtools/brexitindicators/#

Regarding cross-Border indicators, the latest trade in goods statistics indicate that in the months January to May 2019, exports of goods to Northern Ireland amounted to €897 million and imports were valued at €624 million. In the first five months of 2018, the corresponding figures were exports of €805 million to Northern Ireland and imports of €607 million. In the year 2018, exports to Northern Ireland were valued at €2.034 million and imports were €1.493 million. These trade indicators are not broken down by size of enterprise.

The CSO’s Cross-Border Shopping survey published in December 2018 showed that an estimated 13.6% of households made at least one shopping trip annually to Northern Ireland. The estimated annual expenditure on shopping in Northern Ireland was €458 million. In the Border region, an estimated 44% of households had made at least one shopping trip to Northern Ireland in the past year, with an estimated annual expenditure of €287 million.

Census 2016 recorded 9,336 people who crossed the border daily for work and school, a decrease of 2.1 per cent on the 2011 figure of 9,536. Workers made up three quarters of commuters (7,037) while students accounted for the remainder (2,299). Donegal accounted for the largest number of cross border commuters, with 5,600 commuters, three quarters of whom travelled to County Derry. Counties Monaghan (1,112), Louth (926) and Cavan (493) also had substantial numbers who crossed the border to work and school.

The Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency (NISRA) has also published extensive research and analysis in advance of EU Exit, which is available at the following link: https://www.nisra.gov.uk/statistics/economy/eu-exit-analysis.

Capital Expenditure Programme

Questions (9, 10)

Barry Cowen

Question:

9. Deputy Barry Cowen asked the Taoiseach the number of capital projects being undertaken by his Department; the final agreed tender price; and the estimated cost of each capital project in tabular form. [31559/19]

View answer

Barry Cowen

Question:

10. Deputy Barry Cowen asked the Taoiseach the capital projects completed since 2010; the final agreed tender price for each project; the actual cost of each project; if the actual cost exceeded the tender price; and the reason therefor in each case in tabular form. [31560/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Taoiseach)

I propose to take Questions Nos. 9 and 10 together.

My Department had no capital expenditure for the years 2010 to date.

Project Ireland 2040

Questions (11, 14, 15)

Jack Chambers

Question:

11. Deputy Jack Chambers asked the Taoiseach if current expenditure estimates for capital projects under Project Ireland 2040 under the remit of his Department and agencies match projected cost requirements in tabular form. [31561/19]

View answer

Jack Chambers

Question:

14. Deputy Jack Chambers asked the Taoiseach the capital projects which have been delayed under Project Ireland 2040 under the remit of his Department and agencies in tabular form; and when these projects will commence. [31564/19]

View answer

Jack Chambers

Question:

15. Deputy Jack Chambers asked the Taoiseach the capital projects that have commenced under Project Ireland 2040 under the remit of his Department and agencies in tabular from. [31565/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Taoiseach)

I propose to take Questions Nos. 11, 14 and 15 together.

My Department has no capital expenditure.

Departmental Communications

Questions (12)

Shane Cassells

Question:

12. Deputy Shane Cassells asked the Taoiseach the oversight of his Department of directives, circulars, advice or requirements issued since 2016; if surveys have been carried out of compliance with these communications to date; if so, the surveys carried out; the results of the surveys; the compliance rate; and the actions taken by his Department further to these results. [31562/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Taoiseach)

My Department is subject to normal Civil and Public Service Governance practices and procedures across all areas of operations including Corporate Governance, Finance, Human Resources, and Procurement. Circulars and guidelines relating to corporate governance matters for Departments and Agencies are issued by the Department of Public Expenditure and Reform and published on https://circulars.gov.ie. These circulars generally provide guidance in the matters of pay, pensions, leave and other conditions of employment.

In this regard my Department takes the necessary steps and measures to implement the provisions of such circulars, as appropriate. It is standard practice that circulars are brought to the attention of staff and where relevant to the attention of the National Economic and Social Development Office which is the only body under my Department's aegis.

Climate Change Adaptation Plans

Questions Nos. 14 and 15 answered with Question No. 11.

Questions (13)

Timmy Dooley

Question:

13. Deputy Timmy Dooley asked the Taoiseach the recurring weekly meetings attended by either him or the Secretary General of his Department at which climate change and or preparations within his Department to enact a climate plan has been an agenda item. [31563/19]

View answer

The Climate Action Plan 2019 To Tackle Climate Breakdown was published on 17 June 2019.

Tackling climate action is the right thing to do, in terms of stabilising our climate, for all of us but particularly the young people here. But it is also beneficial in other ways - it is warmer homes, it is cleaner air, it is shorter commutes, less time in the car. It is also about creating new jobs, new wealth and new businesses for the future. So, even if there were no targets to reach, even if there were no fines that we might incur, this is good policy anyway. It is good economic policy, it is good social policy, it is good environment policy and we just need to make it happen.

During the development of the Plan, it was considered at a number of meetings of the Cabinet Committee on Infrastructure which I chair, and at a number of meetings of the relevant Senior Officials Group chaired by my Department, before being submitted to the Government for approval. Climate Change has also been discussed, as appropriate, at Government meetings to focus on particular issues, with a view to seeing how Government can best assist the delivery of priorities and commitments. The MAC of my Department has also considered Climate Change at their meetings.

The Climate Action Plan outlines significant new governance structures to ensure that climate policy is implemented including the establishment of a Climate Action Delivery Board within my Department.

The first meeting of the Delivery Board took place on 16 July 2019. The Board is jointly chaired by the Secretary General of my Department and the Secretary General of the Department of Communications, Climate Action and Environment. The membership comprises of Secretaries General from Departments responsible for the actions outlined in the Plan.

Questions Nos. 14 and 15 answered with Question No. 11.

Living Wage

Questions (16)

Willie O'Dea

Question:

16. Deputy Willie O'Dea asked the Taoiseach the estimated cost of implementing a living wage €12.30 for all employees directly employed and-or in agencies under his remit. [31566/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Taoiseach)

The suggested wage at €12.30 per hour based on the Civil Service 37 hour standard net working week equates to an annual salary of €23,747. Public servants currently on an annual salary of less than €23,747 may be receiving remuneration in excess of the suggested living wage through additional premium payments in respect of shift or atypical working hours or are on salary scales that progress to the suggested living wage and above through incremental progression.

The current estimated additional annual salary cost of implementing a living wage of €12.30 for employees of my Department or the National Economic and Social Development Office is approximately €3,536.

Cyber Security Policy

Questions (17)

Jack Chambers

Question:

17. Deputy Jack Chambers asked the Taoiseach if his Department has had a cybersecurity breach in the past 12 months. [31567/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Taoiseach)

My Department maintains ongoing contact with the Computer Security Incident Response Team in the National Cyber Security Centre who provide regular guidance and advice relating to current internet security alerts and threats.

The systems and processes which are in place in my Department mitigate against the majority of threats and there have been no known cyber security breaches in the past 12 months.

Cabinet Committee Meetings

Questions (18)

Jack Chambers

Question:

18. Deputy Jack Chambers asked the Taoiseach the number of times each Cabinet committee held a meeting per month in the past four years in tabular form. [31569/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Taoiseach)

The tables below shows the number of times each Cabinet Committee held a meeting per month from August 2015 - July 2019.

Since I became Taoiseach I have held 32 meetings of Cabinet Committees. Cabinet Committee meetings allow for focused discussions on important matters, however the advancement of such important matters is not entirely dependent on Cabinet Committee meetings. Given their significance, these matters are regularly discussed at full Cabinet level and I also meet regularly with individual Ministers, or groups of relevant Ministers, to focus on particular issues, with a view to seeing how Government can best ensure the delivery of its priorities and commitments.

Cabinet Committee meetings held in August – December 2015 as part of the 29 th Government

Sept

Oct

Nov

Dec

Economic Recovery and Jobs

21 Sept

-

2 Nov

7 Dec

Social Policy & Public Service Reform

21 Sept

-

2 Nov

15 Dec

European Affairs

-

-

-

7 Dec

Economic Infrastructure & Climate Change

21 Sept

-

2 Nov

4 Dec

Irish and the Gaeltacht

-

-

-

-

Health

29 Sept

-

2 Nov

-

Justice Reform

21 Sept

-

2 Nov

-

Construction 2020, Housing, Planning & Mortgage Arrears

21 Sept

8 Oct

-

-

Commemorations

-

-

-

7 Dec

Cabinet Committee meetings held in 2016 as part of the 29 th Government

Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

Economic Recovery and Jobs

-

-

-

-

Social Policy & Public Service Reform

-

-

-

-

European Affairs

-

-

-

-

Economic Infrastructure & Climate Change

-

-

-

-

Irish and the Gaeltacht

-

-

-

-

Health

-

-

-

-

Justice Reform

12 Jan

-

-

-

Construction 2020, Housing, Planning & Mortgage Arrears

-

-

-

-

Commemorations

-

-

-

-

Cabinet Committee meetings held in 2016 as part of the 30 th Government

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sept

Oct

Nov

Dec

Housing

12 May, 20 May, 26 May

2 June, 9 June,

15 June, 30 June

7 July

-

28 Sept

27 Oct

7 Nov, 29 Nov

12 Dec

Health

12 May

16 June

21 July

-

22 Sept

-

7 Nov

13 Dec

Social Policy and Public Service Reform

-

-

4 Jul

-

15 Sept

27 Oct

-

12 Dec

Justice Reform

-

6 July

-

-

-

-

21 Dec

European Affairs

-

21 June

-

-

-

19 Oct

-

12 Dec

Regional and Rural Affairs

-

27 June

-

22 Sept

-

7 Nov

12 Dec

Economy, Trade and Jobs

-

-

14 Jul

-

-

4 Oct

7 Nov

6 Dec

Infrastructure, Environment and Climate Action

-

-

7 Jul

-

-

25 Oct

-

12 Dec

Arts, Irish and the Gaeltacht

-

-

-

-

-

13 Oct

-

-

Brexit

-

-

-

-

8 Sept

19 Oct

7 Nov, 24 Nov

20 Dec

Cabinet Committee meetings held in 2017 as part of the 30 th Government

Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Housing

10 Jan

6 Feb, 27 Feb

-

10 Apr

15 May

Health

11 Jan

2 Feb

21 Mar

27 Apr

30 May

Social Policy and Public Service Reform

-

6 Feb

-

10 Apr

23 May

Justice Reform

-

-

7 Mar

-

-

European Affairs

-

-

8 Mar

-

-

Regional and Rural Affairs

-

-

-

-

9 May

Economy, Trade and Jobs

30 Jan

27 Feb

-

10 Apr

-

Infrastructure, Environment and Climate Action

30 Jan

-

-

-

15 May

Arts, Irish, the Gaeltacht and the Islands

-

27 Feb

-

-

25 May

Brexit

26 Jan

-

8 Mar

26 Apr

-

Cabinet Committee meetings held in 2017 as part of the 31 st Government

Jul

Sept

Oct

Nov

Dec

A (Economy)

-

12 Sept

-

23 Nov

-

B (Social Policy and Public Services)

-

11 Sept

-

16 Nov

-

C (European Union, incl Brexit)

-

11 Sept

-

-

-

D (Infrastructure)

-

12 Sept

-

23 Nov

-

E (Health)

-

12 Sept

-

23 Nov

-

F (National Security)

20 Jul

-

-

9 Nov

-

Cabinet Committee meetings held in 2018 as part of the 31 st Government

Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Sept

Oct

Nov

Dec

A (Economy)

18 Jan

-

-

-

-

-

9 Jul

-

-

12 Nov

-

B (Social Policy and Public Services)

-

-

26 Mar

-

-

7 Jun

-

-

22 Oct

-

-

C (European Union, including Brexit)

-

12 Feb

-

-

-

21 Jun

-

-

-

-

-

D (Infrastructure)

-

1 Feb

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

E (Health)

-

-

-

11 Apr

-

-

-

-

-

22 Nov

-

F (National Security)

-

8 Feb

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

G (Justice and Equality Issues)

18 Jan

-

-

16 Apr

-

-

-

-

-

12 Dec

Cabinet Committee meetings held in January – July 2019 as part of the 31 st Government

Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

Jul

A (Economy)

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

B (Social Policy and Public Services)

-

21 Feb

-

-

-

-

11 Jul

C (European Union, including Brexit)

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

D (Infrastructure)

31 Jan

-

-

-

27 May

-

-

E (Health)

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

F (National Security)

-

-

-

1 Apr

-

-

-

G (Justice and Equality Issues)

-

-

-

-

-

10 Jun

-

Departmental Data

Questions (19)

Denis Naughten

Question:

19. Deputy Denis Naughten asked the Taoiseach the different income streams directly paid by persons to his Department or agencies under his remit, such as motor tax; the number of persons making annual payments; the value of same; the number of payments made through staged or incremental payments; the value of same; the additional income generated as a result of payments being made on an incremental basis; if incremental payments are not available, the reason for same; and the corresponding figures for 1999 and 2009. [31570/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Taoiseach)

My Department does not receive staged or incremental payments in the manner referenced in this question. The Department's Appropriations-in-Aid are comprised primarily of superannuation contributions.

There are also no such staged or incremental payments to the National Economic and Social Development Office (NESDO) which is the only body under the aegis of my Department.

Legislative Reviews

Questions (20)

Catherine Connolly

Question:

20. Deputy Catherine Connolly asked the Taoiseach the number of reviews carried out by his Department pursuant to Standing Order 164A of Dáil Éireann; the pieces of legislation to which each review refers; and the number and title of each piece of legislation in respect of which a review pursuant to Standing Order 164A has not been undertaken. [31637/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Taoiseach)

No legislation has been enacted by my Department since June 2016 and therefore no reviews have been undertaken pursuant to Standing Order No. 164A of Dáil Éireann.

Central Statistics Office Data

Questions (21)

Joan Burton

Question:

21. Deputy Joan Burton asked the Taoiseach further to Parliamentary Question No. 102 of 20 September 2017, the reason Irish life tables 17 has not been published to date by the Central Statistics Office; and when same will be published. [31797/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Taoiseach)

Irish Life Tables are calculated based on population data from the Census of Population and three years of final mortality data, centred on the Census year. Irish Life Tables no. 17 will be based on the Census of Population 2016 and final mortality data for 2015, 2016 and 2017. Final mortality data for 2017 will only be available in October 2019.

Work on Life Tables no. 17 must await the availability of final mortality data for 2017. When final deaths data for 2017 are available, work on Life Tables no. 17 can then commence, with a planned publication date in 2020. A more precise publication date for 2020 will be available by end 2019.

Gender Equality

Questions (22)

Robert Troy

Question:

22. Deputy Robert Troy asked the Taoiseach the gender employment gap based on latest data at hand. [31109/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Taoiseach)

The Labour Force Survey (LFS) is a household survey which provides quarterly statistics on employment and unemployment and is the official source of labour market estimates in the State.

The gender employment gap, as published by Eurostat at European level from the LFS, is classified as the difference between the employment rate of women aged 20–64 years and the employment rate of men aged 20–64 years. The most recent figures available from the LFS are for the first quarter (Q1) of 2019.

In Q1 2019 the gender employment gap for Ireland stood at 11.6 percentage points; i.e. the employment rate of women aged 20–64 years (69.4%) was 11.6 percentage points lower than that of men aged 20–64 years (81.0%).

Unemployment Data

Questions (23)

Robert Troy

Question:

23. Deputy Robert Troy asked the Taoiseach the number and proportion of jobless households in the State on a percentage basis; and the corresponding EU number and average rate. [31107/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Taoiseach)

The exact information requested by the Deputy is not available.

The Labour Force Survey (LFS) is a household survey which provides quarterly statistics on employment and unemployment and is the official source of labour market estimates in the State.

The quarterly LFS labour market estimates are produced by NUTS-3 Regions (NUTS-3 is a geocode standard referencing the eight subdivisions of Ireland for statistical purposes). Due to the methodology and sample size of the survey it is not possible to produce reliable county estimates from the LFS.

The quarterly LFS results include the following jobless household indicators. The indicator "Proportion of persons aged 0 - 17 years living in jobless households" is calculated as the share of persons aged 0 - 17 years who are living in households where no one is in employment.

The indicator "Proportion of persons aged 18 - 59 years living in jobless households" is calculated as the share of persons aged 18 - 59 years who are living in households where no one is in employment.

The indicator "Proportion of persons aged 0 - 59 years living in jobless households" is calculated as the share of persons aged 0 - 59 years who are living in households where no one is in employment.

Students aged 18 - 24 years who live in households composed solely of students (persons who have indicated that their Principal Economic Status is Student) of the same age class are not included in the jobless household indicators for those aged 18 – 59 years and 0 – 59 years.

The most recent annual figures available from the LFS for comparison against European results (EU 28) are for the year 2018.

Table 1 below shows the LFS jobless household indicators for Ireland classified by age group and the latest corresponding EU 28 data for 2018.

Table 2 below shows the LFS jobless household indicator classified by NUTS-3 region in 2018.

Table 1 LFS jobless household indicators, Ireland and EU 28, Q1 2018 (annual average)

Proportion of persons aged 0-17 years in jobless households

2018 1

Ireland

11.4

EU 28

9.4

Proportion of persons aged 18-59 years in jobless households

Ireland

9.4

EU 28

9.0

Proportion of persons aged 0-59 years in jobless households

Ireland

10.0

EU 28

n/a

Source: Labour Force Survey (LFS), Central Statistics Office, Ireland and Eurostat.

1 Calculated as average of four quarters.

Data may be subject to future revision.

Data may be subject to sampling or other survey errors, which are greater in respect of smaller values or estimates of change.

Reference period: January - December (annual average).

Table 2 LFS jobless household indicator classified by NUTS-3 region, 2018 (annual average) %

Proportion of all persons aged 0-59 living in jobless households

2018 1

Border

9.2

West

12.0

Mid-West

11.2

South-East

13.0

South-West

9.5

Dublin

8.4

Mid-East

8.3

Midland

14.4

State

10.0

Source: Labour Force Survey (LFS), Central Statistics Office, Ireland.

1 Calculated as average of four quarters.

Data may be subject to future revision.

Data may be subject to sampling or other survey errors, which are greater in respect of smaller values or estimates of change.

Reference period: January - December (annual average)

Enterprise Data

Questions (24)

Robert Troy

Question:

24. Deputy Robert Troy asked the Taoiseach the number of male and female-led start-up enterprises over the period 2014 to 2018 and to date in 2019, in tabular form. [31106/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Taoiseach)

A breakdown by gender of newly birthed enterprises as requested is not currently available, but work is underway to develop these statistics by the CSO. The most recent period for which data is available is 2017. The number of newly birthed enterprises between 2014 and 2017 is set out in the following table:

2014

2015

2016

2017

Enterprise Births

16,256

18,100

19,249

22,241

Note: The figures are taken from the CSO's annual Business Demography statistics. Births of enterprises due to mergers, takeovers, break-ups, change of activity or restructuring are not included in the figures.

Consultancy Contracts Data

Questions (25)

Shane Cassells

Question:

25. Deputy Shane Cassells asked the Taoiseach the number of external consultant reports commissioned by his Department in each of the years March 2011 to 2018 and to date in 2019; the cost of same; the company involved; and the title and publication date by report in tabular form. [32255/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Taoiseach)

The table below details the external consultant reports, including external Information Technology (IT) consultancy, commissioned by my Department in each of the years from March 2011 to 2018 and to date in 2019.

Name

Costs

Date of Commission

Date of Publication

Consultant

Health and Safety Statement 2011

€1,270

2011

N/A

QTS Ltd

Health and Safety Statement 2012

€1,270

2012

N/A

QTS Ltd

Personal Emergency Evacuation Plan Assessment and Disabled Access Review

€307

2013

N/A

QTS Ltd

Health and Safety Statement 2013 and Risk Assessment

€1,783

2013

N/A

QTS Ltd

Local Diaspora Toolkit

€14,300

2015

2015

Clinton Institute UCD

Getting smarter about smart cities: Improving data privacy and data security

€14,058

2015

2015

Maynooth University

Dublin’s North East Inner City

€11,800

2016

2017

Kieran Mulvey

Historical Research Project

€2,608

2017

2017

University College Dublin

Health and Safety Statement 2017 and Risk Assessment

€2,583

2017

N/A

Quadra

Personal Emergency Evacuation Plan Assessment and Disabled Access Review

€800

2017

N/A

Andrew Doyle Safety Consultants

Information Technology Security Risk Assessment Review

€6,911 (including VAT)

2018

2018

Ward Solutions

Information Technology Security Risk Assessment Review

€6,911 (including VAT)

2019

2019

Ward Solutions

Departmental Expenditure

Questions (26)

Shane Cassells

Question:

26. Deputy Shane Cassells asked the Taoiseach the photography costs for his Department in each year since March 2011 including costs incurred from use of the ministerial allowance; the occasions for which photographers were booked; the photographers used; the costs associated with each occasion that a photographer was used in tabular form; and if there is a policy regarding the booking of photographers within his Department. [32272/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Taoiseach)

The information on photography costs for my Department for the period from March 2011 to date, is set out in tabular form below. These tables include the cost, the name of the photographer and the occasions involved.

Photographers are engaged for official purposes only. Local photographers are used on international visits, trade missions etc., to maximise cost efficiencies. Photography costs in my Department have reduced significantly in recent years. The 2018 expenditure of €10,052 represents a reduction of more than 85% when compared with expenditure of €83,398 in 2008.

Increasingly my Department utilises its own staff to take photographs in-house, thereby reducing costs.

Photography costs

Legal Costs

Questions (27)

Shane Cassells

Question:

27. Deputy Shane Cassells asked the Taoiseach the expenditure incurred in respect of external legal fees in each year since March 2011, in tabular form. [32289/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Taoiseach)

My Department incurred no expenditure in respect of external legal fees in the years 2011 to date in 2019.

The Moriarty Tribunal of Inquiry and the Commissions of Investigation, which are independent of my Department, have sanction to engage legal counsel, as required, to assist them in their work. All legal services fees are paid at rates approved by the Government.

Departmental Expenditure

Questions (28)

Shane Cassells

Question:

28. Deputy Shane Cassells asked the Taoiseach the expenditure incurred in external information technology costs in each year since March 2011, in tabular form. [32306/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Taoiseach)

The expenditure incurred by the Department in relation to external ICT costs which includes external service provision, website maintenance, ICT contractors and technical consultancy for the period from March 2011 to date, is set out in tabular form below.

Year

Expenditure

March - Dec 2011

€161,679.59

2012

€129,029.15

2013

€139,678.88

2014

€161,232.54

2015

€175,806.84

2016

€299,731.94

2017

€99,502.09

2018

€149,671.01

Jan 2019 to date

€25,172.94

Protected Disclosures Data

Questions (29)

Catherine Murphy

Question:

29. Deputy Catherine Murphy asked the Taoiseach the number of protected disclosures for which he has engaged an external consultancy and-or legal firm since 2014 to date; the name of the firms engaged; the year and the costs associated with engaging the consultancy and-or legal firms in respect of protected disclosures; and the way in which persons are protected in cases in which an external consultancy firm is engaged in respect of protected disclosures. [32406/19]

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Written answers (Question to Taoiseach)

My Department has had no protected disclosures since 2014 for which an external consultancy or legal firm has been engaged.

Taoiseach's Meetings and Engagements

Questions (30)

Micheál Martin

Question:

30. Deputy Micheál Martin asked the Taoiseach the phone calls and meetings he had to discuss the position that the European Commissioner from Ireland will hold for the next five years. [32785/19]

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Written answers (Question to Taoiseach)

I confirmed on 9 July, following the Government meeting that morning, my intention to nominate Phil Hogan for a second term as Ireland’s member of the European Commission. His re-nomination is an endorsement of his work to date, and an indication of the importance we place on our engagement with EU institutions.

The allocation of portfolios in the new Commission will be a matter for the new Commission President.

On 12 July I spoke with Ursula von der Leyen to congratulate her on her nomination by the European Council for President of the European Commission. In our short conversation I looked forward to having a future opportunity to brief her on Ireland's concerns on Brexit, and to discuss with her the future organisation of the new Commission and the role of the Irish Commissioner within it, after her election in the European Parliament.

Departmental Reports

Questions (31)

Anne Rabbitte

Question:

31. Deputy Anne Rabbitte asked the Taoiseach the number of feasibility studies conducted by his Department in County Galway in each of the years 2016 to 2018 and to date in 2019, in tabular form; the names of each project being studied; the amount allocated and drawn down for each study; and the person or body that sought each study. [32949/19]

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Written answers (Question to Taoiseach)

No feasibility studies have been conducted by my Department in County Galway in the years 2016 to 2018 or to date in 2019.