Judicial Council

Questions (618, 683, 684)

Pearse Doherty

Question:

618. Deputy Pearse Doherty asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the date of the establishment of the judicial council and thereafter the personal injuries guidelines committee in accordance with the Judicial Council Act 2019; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [35800/19]

View answer

Michael McGrath

Question:

683. Deputy Michael McGrath asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the status of the implementation of the Judicial Council Act 2019 with regard to the establishment of a judicial council and the development of personal injury guidelines by the council; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [36583/19]

View answer

Michael McGrath

Question:

684. Deputy Michael McGrath asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the steps he is taking to facilitate the development of personal injury guidelines by the proposed judicial council as set out in the Judicial Council Act 2019; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [36584/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Justice)

I propose to take Questions Nos. 618, 683 and 684 together.

In conjunction with the Courts Service, my Department is taking steps towards establishing the Judicial Council by the end of this year. This includes considering the practical arrangements for staffing and accommodation, which will need to be put in place before the Judicial Council is established.

The relevant Orders to commence the Judicial Council Act 2019 are expected to be made later this year.

In follow-up to the relevant recommendation of the Cost of Insurance Working Group chaired by Minister of State Michael D’Arcy TD, the Council will also include a Personal Injuries Guidelines Committee. This Committee has been mandated by the Oireachtas to prepare a draft of the personal injuries guidelines within 6 months of its establishment by the Council. Those guidelines will then have to be adopted by the Judicial Council which, under the terms of the Act, will be independent in exercising its functions.

Prison Service Staff

Questions (619)

Michael Fitzmaurice

Question:

619. Deputy Michael Fitzmaurice asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the number of staff due to take compulsory retirement from a prison (details supplied) between 31 August 2019 and 31 December 2020; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [35802/19]

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Written answers (Question to Justice)

I am informed by the Director General of the Irish Prison Service that two members of staff are due to take compulsory retirement from the prison referred to by the Deputy during the period 31 August 2019 to 31 December 2020 having reached the maximum retirement age of 60.

Prison Service Staff

Questions (620, 621)

Michael Fitzmaurice

Question:

620. Deputy Michael Fitzmaurice asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the number of staff the Irish Prison Service is planning to transfer to a location (details supplied) from other prisons between 31 August 2019 and 31 December 2020; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [35803/19]

View answer

Michael Fitzmaurice

Question:

621. Deputy Michael Fitzmaurice asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the reason the Irish Prison Service only transfers a small number of staff to a location (details supplied) in comparison to other prisons in view of the fact it is understaffed; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [35804/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Justice)

I propose to take Questions Nos. 620 and 621 together.

I am advised by the Irish Prison Service that the transfer of staff to each prison is based on the number of vacancies at each grade and overall resource availability.  The number of vacancies within a grade varies for a number of reasons and can change from week to week.  These variations include staff promotions, retirements and transfers and as such it is not possible to predict the number of staff who will transfer to the prison referred to in the Question.  The Irish Prison Service routinely review the number of vacancies across the Prison estate and progress transfers in line with available resources and to ensure the optimum allocation of these resources. 

I am further advised by the Irish Prison Service that staffing requirements are continuously monitored, and that the Irish Prison Service recruitment process is on-going. Currently the Irish Prison Service are filling vacancies for Prison Clerical Officers, Recruit Prison Officers, Prison Nurses along with some Senior Level grades.

Visa Applications

Questions (622)

Aengus Ó Snodaigh

Question:

622. Deputy Aengus Ó Snodaigh asked the Minister for Justice and Equality if he will address a matter regarding the case of a person (details supplied). [35822/19]

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Written answers (Question to Justice)

I am advised by the Immigration Service of my Department that the visa application referred to was refused by the Visa Office New Delhi on 12th June 2019. A subsequent appeal was unsuccessful and the original decision upheld. This was communicated to the applicant, along with the refusal reasons on 28th August 2019.

Only one appeal is permitted per application.  However, it remains open to the applicant to make a fresh application. If such an application is made, the applicant should bear in mind the refusal reasons communicated to him and be in a position to address those reasons in any new application.

The Deputy may wish to note that queries in relation to the status of individual immigration cases may be made directly to the Immigration Service of my Department, by e-mail, using the Oireachtas Mail facility which has been specifically established for this purpose. This service enables up to date information on such cases to be obtained without the need to seek information by way of the Parliamentary Questions process. The Deputy may consider using the e-mail service except in cases where the response from Immigration Service is, in the Deputy’s view, inadequate or too long awaited.  In addition, applicants may themselves e-mail queries directly to the Immigration Service (visamail@justice.ie).

Personal Injury Claims

Questions (623)

Tom Neville

Question:

623. Deputy Tom Neville asked the Minister for Justice and Equality his plans to introduce legislation to cap insurance awards for soft tissue issues; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [35827/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Justice)

I can advise the Deputy that the issue of awards in personal injuries claims is being dealt with within the framework of the Judicial Council Act 2019, which was passed by the Houses of the Oireachtas before the summer recess. 

This landmark Act provides for the establishment of an independent Judicial Council.  It also provides for the establishment of a number of committees including a personal injuries guidelines committee, which will be assigned the function of compiling guidelines for appropriate general damages for various types of personal injury.

It is anticipated that the Council will be established by the end of the year.  My Department and the Courts Service are currently considering the practical arrangements, which will need to be in place before the Council is established.

Departmental Schemes

Questions (624)

Jan O'Sullivan

Question:

624. Deputy Jan O'Sullivan asked the Minister for Justice and Equality if the recent changes to the atypical working scheme will be reviewed in view of the effect it is having on the availability of locum doctors who have been playing a strong role in out-of-hours general practitioner schemes, including Shannondoc; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [35834/19]

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Written answers (Question to Justice)

I can advise the Deputy that policy responsibility relating to locum doctors is primarily a matter for the Health Service Executive (HSE). The role of the Immigration Service of my Department is to provide immigration mechanisms by which non-EEA medical personnel may be recruited to fill temporary vacancies in the health sector as and when required. I am advised that in recent months the Immigration Service has consulted closely with the HSE to determine if the terms of the Scheme require any amendments.  My Department remains committed  to ongoing stakeholder engagement to ensure the smooth operating of the Atypical Working Scheme (AWS) with regards to locum GP’s.

Under current arrangements, which have been in place since 2015, doctors undertaking locum work in the Primary Care (GP) sector may be granted a ‘block’ 90-day permission for the duration of their 90-day contract. Exit from and re-entry into the State is not permitted during this 90-day period, except in exceptional circumstances.  The terms of the AWS also provide that at least one month must elapse from the expiry date of the 90 day permission before a new application may be made. The rationale for this approach, which applies to all such permissions, is rooted in the principle that an atypical permission is not a substitute for the replacement of full time labour (either sourced within Ireland or the EU or through the Non EEA Work Permit regime). Thus a person granted such permission cannot automatically roll over their atypical permission.  These conditions have applied to permissions granted under the Scheme since its inception. 

Atypical immigration permissions are specifically designed to cover such short term employments in the State and there are alternative options available for longer term employment through the work permit regime of the Department of Business, Enterprise and Innovation.

Deportation Orders

Questions (625)

Maureen O'Sullivan

Question:

625. Deputy Maureen O'Sullivan asked the Minister for Justice and Equality if a deportation order (details supplied) will be reconsidered. [35841/19]

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Written answers (Question to Justice)

I am advised by the Immigration Service of my Department that the person concerned is the subject of a deportation order made following a comprehensive and thorough examination of their asylum claim and a detailed examination of the representations they submitted for consideration under Section 3 of the Immigration Act 1999 (as amended).

The person concerned, through their legal representative, has made a request to have that deportation order revoked, based on the provisions of Section 3 (11) of the Immigration Act 1999 (as amended). This request will be considered as soon as it is possible to do. The Deputy might wish to note that the resulting decision will be to 'affirm' or to 'revoke' the existing Deportation Order.

The Deputy may wish to note that queries in relation to the status of individual immigration cases may be made directly to the Immigration Service of my Department, by e-mail, using the Oireachtas Mail facility which has been specifically established for this purpose. This service enables up to date information on such cases to be obtained without the need to seek information by way of the Parliamentary Questions process. The Deputy may consider using the e-mail service except in cases where the response from the Immigration Service is, in the Deputy’s view, inadequate or too long awaited. 

Direct Provision Data

Questions (626)

Fiona O'Loughlin

Question:

626. Deputy Fiona O'Loughlin asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the number of persons in RIA emergency accommodation services; the number in bed and breakfast accommodation nationally; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [35847/19]

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Written answers (Question to Justice)

As of 25 August 2019, 7,170 persons were residing in accommodation provided by the Reception and Integration Agency (RIA).  Of this total, there were 1,182 applicants residing in 31 Emergency Accommodation locations. Of the 1,182 applicants in emergency accommodation, 834 reside in hotels and the remaining 348 applicants reside in guest houses.

 The contractual obligation on the providers of emergency accommodation is for the provision of bed spaces and full board accommodation (breakfast, lunch and dinner).  RIA often does not have exclusive use of the premises and many of the hotels and guesthouses continue to operate on a commercial basis.

In the first half of this year, there has been a 36% annual increase in the number of international protection applications received. To meet the associated increased demand for accommodation, RIA has initiated two processes to source additional accommodation. RIA has sought expressions of interest from parties who would be interested in providing accommodation and related services to people in the international protection process and has also launched a nationwide, regional tendering process to source new accommodation centres.

These new centres, which are expected to begin opening in the coming months, will provide for independent living for residents by way of cooking facilities and an onsite food hall.  I expect that they will significantly enhance the daily lives of applicants and in particular families and children.

Cyberbullying Issues

Questions (627)

James Browne

Question:

627. Deputy James Browne asked the Minister for Justice and Equality his plans to revise harassment laws here taking into consideration the impact of cyberbullying on the mental health of a person; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [35868/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Justice)

As the Deputy will be aware, many forms of online content and behaviours, including cyberbullying, can be harmful but they are not necessarily criminal in nature.  There is a general consensus that the appropriate response to addressing such online issues is one that encompasses educational and awareness raising campaigns, as well as effective actions and policies on the part of internet companies. The Government’s Action Plan for Online Safety 2018 - 2019 has outlined plans to provide resources and to facilitate positive actions being taken to combat online safety issues including cyberbullying.

In relation to harassment laws specifically, the Law Reform Commission published a report on Harmful Communications and Digital Safety in 2016 which recommended a number of legislative changes to deal more effectively with the negative aspects of increased use of online communications. Many of the recommendations outlined in this report have been provided for in the Harassment, Harmful Communications and Related Offences Bill 2017, a Private Member’s Bill sponsored by Deputy Brendan Howlin. The main provisions of the Bill as published include extending the existing offence of harassment and the introduction of new offences to deal with the distribution of intimate images. The Bill also provides for a new offence in relation to sending indecent of obscene messages using any form of online or traditional method of communications.

The Bill completed second stage in the Dáil in January 2018 and was not opposed by Government. I obtained Cabinet approval to support Deputy Howlin’s Bill to ensure that legislation in this area can be enacted as swiftly as possible. Following the agreement by Cabinet to support and amend the Bill, officials in my Department engaged in extensive consultations with the sponsor of the Bill and the Office of the Attorney General to prepare draft amendments. The amendments will  ensure consistency in the provisions of the Bill. They will also introduce a distinct offence of stalking in Ireland for the first time. They will provide for two separate image-based offences to deal with the phenomena of “upskirting” and “revenge pornography”. They will remove some of the civil provisions in the Bill that may be more appropriately dealt with through proposals to establish the Office of the Digital Safety Commissioner, currently being examined by the Department of Communications, Climate Action and Environment.

These amendments were approved by Government on the 1 May 2019 and have now been sent to the Office of Parliamentary Counsel to be formally drafted. They will be introduced at Committee Stage in the Dáil at the earliest possible opportunity. 

Insurance Fraud

Questions (628, 629, 630, 631, 632, 633, 634)

Pearse Doherty

Question:

628. Deputy Pearse Doherty asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the number of incidents of fraudulent insurance claims reported by the insurance industry to An Garda Síochána in each of the years 2016 to 2018 and to date in 2019, by insurance company. [35954/19]

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Pearse Doherty

Question:

629. Deputy Pearse Doherty asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the number of incidents of fraudulent insurance claims reported by the public to An Garda Síochána in each of the years 2016 to 2018 and to date in 2019. [35955/19]

View answer

Pearse Doherty

Question:

630. Deputy Pearse Doherty asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the number of defendants investigated in incidents of insurance fraud reported by the insurance industry to An Garda Síochána in each of the years 2016 to 2018 and to date in 2019. [35956/19]

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Pearse Doherty

Question:

631. Deputy Pearse Doherty asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the number of units in the Garda National Economic Crime Bureau that assess insurance fraud as opposed to other categories of economic fraud and crime. [35957/19]

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Pearse Doherty

Question:

632. Deputy Pearse Doherty asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the number of whole-time equivalent staff tasked with investigating and prosecuting instances of insurance fraud in the Garda National Economic Crime Bureau by personnel, including gardaí, sergeants, detectives, financial investigators and so on; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [35958/19]

View answer

Pearse Doherty

Question:

633. Deputy Pearse Doherty asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the added resources being dedicated to the divisional strategy for tackling insurance fraud, including personnel and funding; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [35959/19]

View answer

Pearse Doherty

Question:

634. Deputy Pearse Doherty asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the estimated cost of establishing a stand-alone Garda insurance fraud unit consisting of six gardaí, one sergeant and an adequate and suitable number of detective superintendents and-or detective inspectors in addition to qualified financial investigators. [35960/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Justice)

I propose to take Questions Nos. 628 to 634, inclusive, together.

The Garda Commissioner has responsibility for management of An Garda Síochána and for the allocation of Garda resources, in light of identified operational demands.  The Deputy will appreciate that the Commissioner is solely responsible for the allocation of personnel as well as organisational matters including the nature/number of Garda units involved in investigating any given criminal matter, including insurance fraud, and the resourcing of criminal investigations.

I can inform the Deputy that the Commissioner is of the view that a Divisional focus on insurance fraud is preferable to the establishment of a centralised investigation unit. This approach is aligned with the divisional-focussed Garda model. It is the intention of the Commissioner that the Garda National Economic Crime Bureau (GNECB) will guide Divisions and provide training in the investigation of insurance fraud.

The Cost of Insurance Working Group specifically called for An Garda Síochána to explore the potential for further cooperation between it and the insurance sector in relation to insurance fraud investigation. An industry-funded Garda insurance fraud unit was just one option considered in this regard. While the Commissioner has indicated that he does not support industry funding of Garda units, he is open to considering other industry-funded proposals to combat insurance fraud.

Reports of insurance-related fraud are received by An Garda Síochána and statistics are not held by my Department.  I have been advised by the Garda authorities that changes were made to the Garda PULSE system last year to provide An Garda Síochána with the facility to more efficiently record insurance-related criminality. In relation to the scale of insurance fraud reported to An Garda Síochána, the most recent figures available to my Department are available in the ninth progress report published by the Cost of Insurance Working Group in July, a copy of which is available at the following link: https://assets.gov.ie/19322/8404160a5cc44b53b482c34ac1316f3b.pdf. 

In the period 1 November 2018 (i.e. the date on which the new statistical category of ‘insurance fraud’ came into being) to end May 2019, 50 incidents of insurance fraud were recorded on PULSE It should be noted that this data is correct as at 6 June 2019, however the data is operational and is therefore subject to change.

More recently, each Garda Síochána Division has been requested to provide information regarding the extent of insurance-related fraud. This information is being examined at the GNECB and will be utilised to determine investigative activity, which will be undertaken in future ‘days of action’ under Operation Coatee.

Operation Coatee was launched in April 2019, its focus being the prevention of insurance-related fraud and associated crimes on a coordinated basis throughout Ireland. In circumstances where insurance fraud has already occurred, Operation Coatee is designed to maximise the prospect of identifying suspected culprits, and, where possible and appropriate, to initiate criminal proceedings.

A ‘day of action’ was undertaken at the commencement of Operation Coatee on 24 April 2019.  The Garda National Economic Crime Bureau (GNECB) engaged in operational activity associated with an investigation relating to over 20 insurance claims which have been made and which, in some cases, have already involved payment being made to claimants. Arising from the ‘day of action’, 6 high-value cars and jewellery with a value in excess of €300,000 were seized, along with a substantial amount of documentation and financial records.  The evidence seized continues to be analysed.

On a wider level, I have previously referred to the constructive engagement that has taken place between An Garda Síochána and the insurance industry under the cost of insurance review. This includes a commitment by An Garda Síochána and Insurance Ireland’s Anti-Fraud Forum to meet on a regular basis in order to discuss and act upon current and ongoing general issues which arise in the area of insurance fraud.

Citizenship Applications

Questions Nos. 636 to 638, inclusive, answered with Question No. 533.

Questions (635)

Maureen O'Sullivan

Question:

635. Deputy Maureen O'Sullivan asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the way he plans to address the continuous residence requirement for persons applying for citizenship; and the number of applications for citizenship affected by a ruling (details supplied). [35965/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Justice)

I am aware that the recent judgment of the High Court relating to continuous residency under Section 15(1)(c) of the Irish Nationality and Citizenship Act, 1956 (as amended) has given cause for concern. The matter remains before the courts with the lodgement of an appeal before the Court of Appeal and is therefore sub-judice.

I am advised by the Immigration Service of my Department that, as of 3 September 2019, there were 15,647 applications for citizenship on hand. All of these applicants are potentially affected by the ruling. To date this year a total of 2,981 adults and 849 minors have been naturalised. I am further advised that this ruling is not considered to have consequences for anyone who has already obtained citizenship under the Act.

I can, however, assure the Deputy that my Department is continuing to work on finding solutions to the situation as quickly as possible. The best interests of both current and future applicants are foremost in these considerations and on 25 July 2019, I obtained Cabinet approval for the drafting of a Bill which seeks to resolve the issue.  

My officials are working with the Office of Parliamentary Counsel in the Attorney General’s Office to have a bill drafted on an urgent basis and be brought before the Houses of the Oireachtas as quickly as possible on resumption of business in mid-September. Further updates, as they become available, will also be posted on the website of the Immigration Service.

The Immigration Service is advising those who are planning to apply for citizenship to continue to collect all of the necessary proofs that support their application and to submit a comprehensive application form. Once a solution is in place, if any additional information is required, applicants will be contacted as part of the processing of their application.

Questions Nos. 636 to 638, inclusive, answered with Question No. 533.

Closed-Circuit Television Systems Provision

Question No. 640 answered with Question No. 562.

Questions (639)

Fiona O'Loughlin

Question:

639. Deputy Fiona O'Loughlin asked the Minister for Justice and Equality if the CCTV scheme will extend beyond 2019 for funding purposes; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [36054/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Justice)

As the Deputy may be aware, Community CCTV is governed by section 38(3)(c) of the Garda Síochána Act 2005 and the Garda Síochána (CCTV) Order 2006 (SI No 289 of 2006). This legal framework requires that any proposed community CCTV scheme must:

- be approved by the local Joint Policing Committee,

- have the prior support of the relevant local authority, which must also act as data controller, and

- have the authorisation of the Garda Commissioner.

This is the legal basis for all community CCTV schemes, regardless of how they are funded and these key legal requirements have not changed since 2006.  The possibility of establishing a Community CCTV scheme is available to groups that meet these legal requirements, anywhere in the country. 

Since 2017, my Department has administered a grant aid scheme supporting groups wishing to establish a community-based CCTV system in their area.  To date, 21 applications have been approved under the scheme, involving approved grants totalling more than €540,000.  

The Deputy will appreciate that while the Estimates process is ongoing, I am not in a position to respond to her query in relation to my Department's allocation for the coming year. However, I can confirm that the grant aid scheme remains open for applications from interested groups in 2019 and that all fully completed applications received before the end of 2019 will be considered.

Eligible groups, including community groups and local authorities nationwide, can apply for grant-aid of up to 60% of the total capital cost of a proposed CCTV system, up to a maximum total of €40,000.  I am pleased to inform the Deputy that I have recently expanded the grant aid scheme to cover not only new CCTV systems but also to allow funding applications for extension or upgrade of existing Community CCTV systems which are incomplete or obsolete.  Applicants can now also seek a grant of up to €5,000 for minor maintenance costs.

I must emphasise that grant funding can be considered only for CCTV systems which meet the legal requirements for CCTV, in other words CCTV systems which have been approved by the relevant Joint Policing Committee, the relevant Local Authority (also acting as Data Controller) and which have received the authorisation of the Garda Commissioner.

If the Deputy is aware of groups wishing to avail of the scheme, further details are available to download from my Department's website - www.justice.ie and support and guidance is available to help interested groups through a dedicated email address communitycctv@justice.ie

Question No. 640 answered with Question No. 562.

Garda Equipment

Questions (641)

Willie O'Dea

Question:

641. Deputy Willie O'Dea asked the Minister for Justice and Equality his plans to replace aircraft and-or helicopters in the Garda air support unit; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [36117/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Justice)

The resources provided by Government to An Garda Síochána have reached unprecedented levels, with an allocation for 2019 of €1.76 billion.  Very significant capital investment is also being made in An Garda Síochána, including investment of €342 million in Garda ICT infrastructure between 2016 and 2021 and investment of €46 million in the Garda fleet over the same period.

As the Deputy will appreciate, in accordance with the Garda Síochána Act 2005, the Garda Commissioner is responsible for managing and controlling generally the administration and business of An Garda Síochána. Further, the allocation of Garda resources is a matter for the Commissioner, in light of his identified operational demands.

I understand that the Garda Air Support Unit was established in September 1997 with the delivery of a Pilatus Britten-Norman BN 2T-4S Defender 4000 fixed wing aircraft and a Eurocopter AS355N Eceuriel helicopter. In 2001 the Unit acquired a second helicopter - a Eurocopter EC135 T2. In 2007 the Eceuriel helicopter was replaced by a second EC135 T2+.

As the Deputy will appreciate, the question of prioritising the upgrading or replacement of these aircraft is in the first instance for the Commissioner, in the context of the investment being made in An Garda Síochána and his operational priorities.  

I understand from the Garda authorities that neither the two helicopters nor the Fixed Wing Aircraft have reached the end of their operational lives and as such, no funding has been provided in the 2019 budget for the replacement of these aircrafts. 

In relation to the equipment on the helicopters, I can inform the Deputy that funding has been allocated for upgrade of the Role Equipment on the Eurocopter EC135 T2+. A tendering process for this upgrade has commenced and has been published. I am informed that it is intended that the Role Equipment currently on this aircraft will subsequently be installed into the Eurocopter 135 T2 Helicopter.

Regarding the future replacement of the fixed wing aircraft, I can confirm that a Technical Advisory Group comprising of personnel from my Department, An Garda Síochána, the Department of Defence and the Irish Air Corps was established and met for the first time in 2016 to examine the options in that regard.  My Department continues to engage with Garda management on an ongoing basis in relation to that matter, as well as ongoing engagement more generally on current and capital resource needs.

Garda Operations

Questions (642)

Thomas P. Broughan

Question:

642. Deputy Thomas P. Broughan asked the Minister for Justice and Equality further to Parliamentary Question No. 310 of 12 February 2019, if he will report on Garda Operation Disruption; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [36119/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Justice)

I refer to Parliamentary Question No 310 for answer on 12 February 2019.  At the time I responded that I would request the information sought by you from the Garda authorities and that I would write directly to you on receipt of same. This information has been received and is included in the substantive response as follows. 

I am informed by the Garda authorities that Operation Disruption consists of uniform personnel temporarily assigned to the Crime Office, Henry Street Station, Limerick for periods ranging from 3 to 6 months.  Gardaí are tasked to carry out proactive and preventive patrols in targeted areas based on crime trends and crime “hot spots”, as identified by Crime Analysts attached to Henry Street.

I am advised that since the inception of Operation Disruption in 2014 up to 26 March 2019, Operation Disruption has dealt with 4,985 crimes, with 1,255 of those crimes recorded as cases detected.  I am further advised that in 852 cases, prosecutions have commenced resulting in 527 convictions. I have sought a further update from the Garda authorities and I will contact the Deputy directly when the information is to hand.

I am assured by the Garda authorities that all new and emerging crime trends are constantly monitored by Garda management to ensure the effectiveness of all Garda patrols in the area.