Deportation Orders

Questions (693)

Bernard Durkan

Question:

693. Deputy Bernard J. Durkan asked the Minister for Justice and Equality if he will consider setting aside the deportation order in the case of a person (details supplied); if he will use his discretion to set aside the deportation order affirmed 11 years ago on the basis that time and circumstances are completely different from those prevailing before the decision to deport or affirmation; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [36598/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Justice)

I am advised by the Immigration Service of my Department that the person concerned is subject to a Deportation order. Representations have been received on behalf of the person concerned requesting that the deportation order be revoked, pursuant to the provisions of Section 3(11) of the Immigration Act 1999 (as amended). 

This request will be considered as soon as possible.  A decision will then be made to either "affirm" or "revoke" the existing deportation order.  This decision will be communicated in writing.  In the meantime, the deportation order remains valid and in place.

Queries in relation to the status of individual immigration cases may be made directly to the Immigration Service of my Department by e-mail using the Oireachtas Mail facility, which has been specifically established for this purpose.  This service enables up to date information on such cases to be obtained without the need to seek information by way of the Parliamentary Questions process.  The Deputy may consider using the e-mail service except in cases where the response is, in the Deputy's view, inadequate or too long awaited.  

Residency Permits

Question No. 695 answered with Question No. 589.

Questions (694)

Bernard Durkan

Question:

694. Deputy Bernard J. Durkan asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the current or expected position in respect of residency status in the case of a person (details supplied); and if he will make a statement on the matter. [36599/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Justice)

I am advised by the Immigration Service of my Department that written representations have been submitted on behalf of the person concerned.

These representations, together with all other information and documentation on file, will be fully considered, under Section 3 (6) of the Immigration Act 1999 (as amended) and all other applicable legislation, in advance of a final decision being made.  Once a final decision is made, this will be communicated to the person concerned.

Queries in relation to the status of individual immigration cases may be made directly to the Immigration Service of my Department by e-mail using the Oireachtas Mail facility, which has been specifically established for this purpose. This service enables up to date information on such cases to be obtained without the need to seek information by way of the Parliamentary Questions process. The Deputy may consider using the e-mail service except in cases where the response is, in the Deputy’s view, inadequate or too long awaited.

Question No. 695 answered with Question No. 589.

Naturalisation Applications

Questions (696)

Bernard Durkan

Question:

696. Deputy Bernard J. Durkan asked the Minister for Justice and Equality if a meeting can be arranged with an appropriate person in his Department or the INIS in the case of a person (details supplied); and if he will make a statement on the matter. [36601/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Justice)

I am advised by the Immigration Service of my Department that an application for a certificate of naturalisation was received from the person referred to by the Deputy on 28 September 2018. A letter was issued on the 22 October 2018 stating that the  application was deemed ineligible due to required criteria not being met at that time.

I would like to advise the Deputy that it is open to any individual to lodge an application for citizenship if and when they are in a position to meet the statutory conditions as prescribed in the Irish Nationality and Citizenship Act 1956, as amended. All applications for a certificate of naturalisation are processed and assessed individually in accordance with the provisions of the Act.  A determination on whether an applicant satisfies the statutory criteria attendant to naturalisation can only be made after an application is received.

In relation to applications for citizenship, I am aware that the recent judgment of the High Court relating to continuous residency under Section 15(1)(c) of the Irish Nationality and Citizenship Act, 1956 (as amended) has given cause for concern. The matter remains before the courts with the lodgement of an appeal before the Court of Appeal and is therefore sub-judice. I can, however, assure the Deputy that my Department is continuing to work on finding solutions to the situation as quickly as possible. The best interests of both current and future applicants are foremost in these considerations and on 25 July 2019 I obtained Cabinet approval for the drafting of a Bill, which seeks to resolve the issue.  

My officials are working with the Office of Parliamentary Counsel in the Attorney General’s Office to have a bill drafted on an urgent basis and be brought before the Houses of the Oireachtas as quickly as possible on resumption of business in mid-September. Further updates, as they become available, will be posted on the Immigration Service website.

The Immigration Service are advising those who are planning to apply for citizenship to continue to collect all the necessary proofs that support their application and to submit a comprehensive application form. Once a solution is in place, if any additional information is required, applicants will be contacted as part of the processing of the application. I am further advised that this ruling is not considered to have consequences for anyone who has already obtained citizenship under the Act.

Individual queries in relation to the status of individual immigration cases may be made directly to the Immigration Service of my Department by e-mail using the Oireachtas Mail facility, which has been specifically established for this purpose. This service enables up to date information on such cases to be obtained without the need to seek information by way of the Parliamentary Questions process. The Deputy may consider using the e-mail service except in cases where the response is, in the Deputy’s view, inadequate or too long awaited. 

Deportation Orders

Questions (697)

Bernard Durkan

Question:

697. Deputy Bernard J. Durkan asked the Minister for Justice and Equality if the personal handwritten letter sent to the relevant section of his Department by a person (details supplied) has been received by the relevant section of his Department on 2 April 2019; if the contents have been considered; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [36606/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Justice)

I am informed that the person referred to by the Deputy is the subject of a Deportation Order signed on 29 September 2017.  This Order requires the person to remove themselves from the State and remain outside the State.  The enforcement of the Deportation Order is a matter for the Garda National Immigration Bureau. 

As previously advised, representations were received by the Immigration Service of my Department from the person concerned.  The representations, pursuant to the provisions of Section 3(11) of the Immigration Act 1999 (as amended), requested that the Deportation Order be revoked and included information from the person concerned regarding her marriage.  Following the detailed consideration of the information submitted in support of the request, the Deportation Order was affirmed and the person concerned was notified of this by letter dated 27 November 2018. 

There is no outstanding correspondence or application on file for this person. However, it is open to the person concerned to submit any new correspondence, or to re-submit earlier correspondence, which they wish to have considered. 

Queries in relation to the status of individual immigration cases may be made directly to the Immigration Service of my Department by e-mail using the Oireachtas Mail facility, which has been specifically established for this purpose.  This service enables up to date information on such cases to be obtained without the need to seek information by way of the Parliamentary Questions process.  The Deputy may consider using the e-mail service except in cases where the response is, in the Deputy's view, inadequate or too long awaited.

Immigration Support Services

Questions (698)

Bernard Durkan

Question:

698. Deputy Bernard J. Durkan asked the Minister for Justice and Equality if a person (details supplied) can obtain an appointment with the person's local immigration officer before 25 September 2019 in view of the fact that the period for ratification of the person's stamp 4 will have expired within the next ten days; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [36607/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Justice)

I am advised by the Immigration Service of my Department that the person referred to by the Deputy lives outside of Dublin.  The Immigration Service is responsible for the registration of non-EEA nationals who live in Dublin city or county, while An Garda Síochána are responsible for the registration of non-EEA nationals living anywhere else in the State.

The person concerned must contact their local Garda Registration Office to make an appointment to renew their registration.  In the case of this individual, their local Registration Office is Leixlip Garda station.

The Deputy may wish to note that queries in relation to the status of individual immigration cases may be made directly to the Immigration Service of my Department, by e-mail, using the Oireachtas Mail facility which has been specifically established for this purpose. This service enables up to date information on such cases to be obtained without the need to seek information by way of the Parliamentary Questions process. The Deputy may consider using the e-mail service except in cases where the response is, in the Deputy’s view, inadequate or too long awaited.

Crime Data

Questions (699)

Anne Rabbitte

Question:

699. Deputy Anne Rabbitte asked the Minister for Justice and Equality if his Department maintains a database of unsolved homicide and manslaughter cases here; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [36640/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Justice)

I can confirm that my Department does not maintain a database of unsolved homicide cases.

The Deputy will appreciate that the conduct of Garda investigations, including cold cases, is a matter solely for the Garda Commissioner and his management team and I have no role in that regard.

However, I am advised by the Garda authorities that the Serious Crime Review Team (SCRT) continues to review serious cases that remain unsolved including the identification of evidence and witnesses to assist in the development of these cases. 

I am further advised that at the conclusion of each review by the SCRT, a substantive report is provided to the Senior Investigating Officer who considers the opportunities for further investigation. Any recommendation of organisational effect is disseminated within the Garda organisation to improve the overall investigative capability of An Garda Síochána.

Residency Permits

Questions (700)

Bernard Durkan

Question:

700. Deputy Bernard J. Durkan asked the Minister for Justice and Equality if an application by a person (details supplied) will be considered in respect of a case; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [36647/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Justice)

The application referred to by the Deputy is being dealt with by the relevant section of the Immigration Service of my Department. The application was submitted on 15 October 2018. 

Permission to remain in the State for parents of Irish Citizen Children may be granted where the applicant can show that they are playing an active role in the life of the Irish Citizen Child.  The child must also be residing continuously in Ireland. If the person concerned is granted permission as the parent of an Irish Citizen Child, the child will need to attend the Immigration Service when their parent is registering their permission to reside in the State.

The Deputy may wish to note that queries in relation to the status of individual immigration cases may be made directly to the Immigration Service of my Department, by e-mail, using the Oireachtas Mail facility which has been specifically established for this purpose. This service enables up to date information on such cases to be obtained without the need to seek information by way of the Parliamentary Questions process. The Deputy may consider using the e-mail service except in cases where the response is, in the Deputy’s view, inadequate or too long awaited.

Naturalisation Applications

Questions (701)

Bernard Durkan

Question:

701. Deputy Bernard J. Durkan asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the status of an application for naturalisation in the case of a person (details supplied). [36648/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Justice)

I understand that an application for naturalisation from the person concerned was deemed ineligible as the Statutory Declaration, which forms a solemn and fundamental part of the prescribed application form, was not fully completed.  The importance of both signing and dating the Statutory Declaration is highlighted in the guidelines attached to the application form.

It is open to the person concerned to submit a further application with all of the completed documentation, for consideration.

Detailed information on Irish citizenship and naturalisation, as well as the relevant application forms, is available on the website of the Immigration Service at www.inis.gov.ie.  The website also contains guidance on how to complete an application form, along with an on-line naturalisation residency calculator, which may be helpful to establish if a person meets the statutory residency requirements. 

Queries in relation to the status of individual immigration cases may be made directly to the Immigration Service of my Department by e-mail using the Oireachtas Mail facility, which has been specifically established for this purpose. This service enables up to date information on such cases to be obtained without the need to seek information by way of the Parliamentary Questions process. The Deputy may consider using the e-mail service except in cases where the response is, in the Deputy’s view, inadequate or too long awaited.   

Juvenile Offenders

Questions (702)

Róisín Shortall

Question:

702. Deputy Róisín Shortall asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the number of juvenile referrals to the national office by Garda division in each of the past three years and to date in 2019, in tabular form. [36690/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Justice)

I have sought a report from the Garda Authorities in relation to this matter and I will write directly to the Deputy when I receive the requested information.

Garda Recruitment

Questions (703)

Róisín Shortall

Question:

703. Deputy Róisín Shortall asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the estimated cost of each 100 additional gardaí and each additional 100 new Garda civilian staff to be recruited, respectively, in 2020. [36703/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Justice)

There has been an unprecedented level of investment in An Garda Síochána in recent years. The budgetary allocation to An Garda Síochána for 2019 amounts to €1.76 billion, which includes provision for sustained recruitment to An Garda Síochána this year.

The Garda Commissioner is responsible for managing and controlling the administration and business of An Garda Síochána, including by arranging for the recruitment and training of personnel.  Further, the allocation of Garda resources and distribution of personnel are a matter for the Commissioner, in light of identified operational demands.

I am pleased to say that recruitment of Garda members and staff is ongoing - An Garda Síochána is a growing organisation. We currently have over 14,200 Gardaí nationwide, supported by over 2,600 Garda staff. And as part of the Government’s plan to achieve an overall Garda workforce of 21,000 personnel by 2021, there is ongoing and increased recruitment both of new Gardaí as well as Garda staff, allowing for redeployment of Gardaí to operational duties at the front-line. Since the reopening of the Garda Training College in 2014, approximately 2,800 new Garda members have attested and been assigned to frontline policing duties in communities throughout the country. Another 200 probationer Gardaí are due to attest by the end of this year. Further, the Garda Commissioner’s decision to recruit a net 600 Garda staff in 2019 will allow for the redeployment of approximately 500 experienced Gardaí to frontline and visible policing duties by the end of this year. 

I am informed by the Garda authorities that the current estimated full year cost of employing 100 new Gardaí in 2020 is approximately €2,390,700.  I am further informed that this estimate assumes that 100 all new recruits commence training on 1 January 2020.

It should be noted that payroll costs for new Garda recruits include a basic allowance of €184 per week.  After 32 weeks of training, Garda recruits are attested and move on to the first point of the Garda pay scale €30,980 (on the basis of the pay scale which will be in operation on completion of training in August 2020). These figures include Employer's PRSI and an estimate of allowances which Garda members may qualify for depending on their assignments. The annual cost will increase as the members move up the Garda pay scale each year.

With regard to Garda staff, I am  informed that such staff positions range from clerical support and financial management functions to specialised roles in HR, IT and telecommunications, as well as finance and procurement, internal audit, communications, research and analysis, accommodation, scene-of-crime support and legal and medical services.  Large numbers of Garda staff also work in operational areas including the Garda Central Vetting Bureau, the Garda Information Service Centre, the Fixed Charge Processing Office and the Command and Control Centre.

Bearing in mind this broad range of duties, I am advised by the Garda authorities that the estimated cost of employing 100 Garda staff would be approximately €4,500,000, on the basis of an average estimated cost per civilian employee of approximately €45,000, including employer costs such as PRSI.

Direct Provision Data

Questions (704)

Róisín Shortall

Question:

704. Deputy Róisín Shortall asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the anticipated cost in 2019 of the direct provision system. [36704/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Justice)

On 15 August 2019, the Spending Review on Direct Provision 2019 was published by the Department of Public Expenditure and Reform, as is the normal practice for Spending Reviews. The Review was prepared  by the Irish Government Economic and Evaluation Service (IGEES) unit of my Department with key input from the Reception and Integration Agency (RIA) and the Irish Naturalisation and Immigration Service (INIS). For the Deputy's further information I attach a link to the published Review.

http://www.justice.ie/en/JELR/Spending_Review.pdf/Files/Spending_Review.pdf

As set out in the Review, the total expenditure in 2018 on accommodation and ancillary services by my Department to meet the accommodation needs of people seeking international protection was €78 million. This was the highest level since 2010. The Review further indicates that the cost could exceed €120 million this year, based on most recent trends.

It found that the expected increase is due to a number of factors, in particular the planned improvements to accommodation standards and the rising number of people seeking international protection. In the first half of this year alone, we have seen a 36% annual increase in the number of applications received. The use of emergency accommodation is also putting significant additional pressure on costs for this year.

To reduce our reliance on emergency accommodation, a public procurement process is currently underway to source new accommodation centres. These centres, which are expected to begin opening in the coming months, will provide for independent living for residents by way of cooking facilities and an onsite food hall.  I expect that this will significantly enhance the daily lives of all applicants and in particular families and children.

Direct Provision System

Questions (705)

Niall Collins

Question:

705. Deputy Niall Collins asked the Minister for Justice and Equality if a transfer request by a person (details supplied) will be facilitated; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [36721/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Justice)

The Reception and Integration Agency (RIA) of the Department has considered the request from the person referred to by the Deputy and replied to him on 4th September.

The Deputy may wish to note that RIA is currently providing accommodation for approximately 7,241 persons.  The composition of protection applicants requiring RIA accommodation (in terms of  individuals/couples/ families) is dynamic, which means that the process of matching the facilities and accommodation available to the changing requirements of those in need of accommodation is an on-going exercise.

Persons seeking international protection in Ireland are offered accommodation by the Department in one of a number of accommodation centres under contract to the Department. Transfers are normally only permitted for very specific reasons and where there is accommodation available in the centre or location to which they are seeking to be transferred.

Asylum Applications

Questions (706)

Bernard Durkan

Question:

706. Deputy Bernard J. Durkan asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the entitlement or otherwise to temporary or long-term residency in the case of a person (details supplied); if the case will be favourably considered; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [36727/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Justice)

As the Deputy will be aware, if an application for asylum or subsidiary protection has been made in the State, for confidentiality reasons it is not the practice to comment on such applications.  The applicant or his legal representative should contact either the International Protection Office (IPO) or the International Protection Appeals Tribunal (IPAT) directly, as appropriate.

The IPO may be contacted either by email to info@ipo.gov.ie, by telephone to the IPO Customer Service Centre at 01 6028008 or in writing to Customer Service Centre, International Protection Office, 79-83 Lower Mount Street, Dublin 2. The International Protection Appeals Tribunal may be contacted either by email to info@protectionappeals.ie, by telephone at 01-4748400 (or Lo-Call 1890 201 458), or in writing to Corporate Services Division, The International Protection Appeals Tribunal, 6-7 Hanover Street East, Dublin D02 W320.

Work Permits Applications

Questions (707)

Alan Farrell

Question:

707. Deputy Alan Farrell asked the Minister for Business, Enterprise and Innovation if consideration of a work permit supported by a potential employer will be considered in the case of a person (details supplied); and if she will make a statement on the matter. [34800/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Business)

The Employment Permits Section of my Department informs me that not enough information has been provided to determine whether the person (details supplied) qualifies for an employment permit.

 Details on how to apply for an employment permit are available on our website at the following link - https://dbei.gov.ie/en/What-We-Do/Workplace-and-Skills/Employment-Permits/, which includes a frequently asked questions document and email helpdesk for any other queries arising.

Work Permits Eligibility

Questions (708)

Maureen O'Sullivan

Question:

708. Deputy Maureen O'Sullivan asked the Minister for Business, Enterprise and Innovation if healthcare assistants will be put on the critical skills visa list in order that healthcare assistants from abroad can be employed here due to the acute shortage of these skills. [35039/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Business)

The State's general policy is to promote the sourcing of labour and skills needs from within the workforce of the State and other EEA states.  Where specific skills prove difficult to source within the State and EEA, the employment permits system offers a conduit into the Irish labour market for non-EEA nationals with in-demand skills and is operated as a vacancy led system.  

The system is managed through the operation of the Critical Skills Occupations List and the Ineligible Occupations List for the purposes of granting an employment permit.  The Lists are subject to twice-yearly review which is predicated on a formalised and evidence-based process and involves consideration of the research undertaken by the Skills and Labour Market Research Unit (Solas), the Expert Group of Future Skills Needs (EGFSN), the National Skills Council, and input by relevant Government Departments in addition to the public consultation phase.  Submissions to the review process are also considered by the Economic Migration Policy Interdepartmental Group chaired by DBEI and which includes a representative from the Department of Health.  

Healthcare assistants and Homecare workers are currently on the Ineligible Occupations List and in order to have an occupation removed from the ineligible list, there would need to be a clear demonstration that recruitment difficulties are solely due to shortages across the EEA and not to other factors such as salary and/or employment conditions.  Organisations in the sector would need to provide the necessary evidence to substantiate their claims.

Following completion of the most recent review, the roles of Healthcare Assistant and Homecare workers were not proposed for amendment at this time.  The views of the lead policy Government Department for the sector, in this case, the Department of Health, are an important part of the decision-making process.  Officials of that Department have advised the sector of the need for further evidence, demonstrating genuine efforts to recruit across the EEA. In particular the sector needs to engage with the Department of Employment Affairs and Social protection who have responsibility for EURES the (European Employment Services), and who are well positioned to help sectors to recruit from within the EEA. 

The mid-year Review of the Occupational Lists is now underway, and submissions received in July are currently under consideration. I expect to receive recommendations, based on available evidence, in relation to possible changes to the lists before the end of the year.

Brexit Preparations

Questions (709)

Seán Crowe

Question:

709. Deputy Seán Crowe asked the Minister for Business, Enterprise and Innovation her views on the fact that InterTradeIreland has found that most businesses are choosing to disregard the potential effects of the UK leaving the EU without a withdrawal agreement (details supplied); and the steps she is taking to help such traders prepare for and deal with a no-deal crash out Brexit. [36085/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Business)

Although the nature of the UK's departure from the EU still remains to be determined, Brexit continues to represent a significant challenge for businesses in Ireland, one which cannot be underestimated. Notwithstanding the uncertainty, however, there are several areas where businesses can take immediate action to prepare.

Since 2016, my Department and its agencies have been working to prepare Irish businesses for the potential challenges posed by Brexit by helping them to assess their preparedness and helping them to implement practical action plans in areas such as customs, supply chain and sourcing, and financial management. While we cannot yet know the form that Brexit will take, these measures aim to assist businesses in identifying and managing key risk areas and develop practical preparatory actions regardless of the circumstances of the UK’s withdrawal from the EU.

The Government’s suite of Brexit supports include preparedness vouchers, consultancy and mentoring supports, tariff advisory services, research on new markets and innovation supports through Enterprise Ireland, the Local Enterprise Offices and InterTrade Ireland. Supports and advice is also available from the National Standards Authority of Ireland, the Health and Safety Authority, IDA Ireland, Revenue, Skillnet Ireland, the Strategic Banking Corporation of Ireland, Bord Bia and Failte Ireland.

The most immediate consequences of a hard Brexit are likely to be currency movements, supply chain constraints, delays, duties and tariffs. In the first instance, there will be a strain on the working capital position of businesses.

Of the Government’s suite of supports, the €300m Brexit Loan Scheme is designed to address working capital challenges brought about by Brexit. Under the Scheme, loans of up to €1.5 million are available at a rate of 4% or less, with loans of up to €500,000 available on an unsecured basis. Similarly, the €300m Future Growth Loan Scheme is designed to support strategic long-term investment in SMEs in a post-Brexit environment.

InterTrade Ireland also plays a major role as part of Ireland’s Brexit response and offers Brexit-related advisory services to eligible businesses. So far this year, more than 3,200 SMEs have directly engaged with the Brexit Advisory Service. 

ITI offers a Brexit Start to Plan voucher and Brexit Implementation Voucher schemes, which enables businesses to get professional advice on how best to plan, prepare and implement for the UK's withdrawal from the European Union. These supports help businesses obtain advice on specific areas such as tariffs, currency management, regulatory and customs issues and movement of labour, goods and services.

ITI Brexit Start to Plan vouchers are worth up to €2,250 (inclusive of VAT) each. 1,613 businesses have applied for a Brexit Start to Plan voucher, of which 1,405 have been approved. ITI new Brexit Implementation Voucher provides financial support up to £5,000/€5,625 (inclusive of VAT), with InterTradeIreland paying 50%. This will allow businesses to implement critical changes making them better prepared to deal with a new trading relationship.

In August, ITI launched a new advertising campaign and a new online resource to encourage and assist firms in preparing for Brexit. The online “Bitesize Brexit” resource is a one-stop-shop for cross-border traders, presenting information in easily digestible segments and includes specific actions businesses should take in preparing for Brexit.

Enterprise Ireland also recently revealed 12 ‘Brexit Essential’ questions aimed at helping exporting businesses further prepare and take action ahead of the UK’s impending withdrawal from the EU.  The Brexit Essentials campaign highlights the key questions and documentation that businesses need to address in order to trade successfully with the UK post 31 October.

The Irish Government, in association with key industry partners, also launched a new support measure to help customs agents, intermediaries and affected Irish businesses develop the capacity to deal with the additional customs requirements due to the UK’s departure from the EU. The new initiative called Clear Customs comprises of a training programme and a customs financial support to assist with the costs of recruiting and assigning new staff to customs roles.

In addition, the Government has held over 100 Brexit information seminars and events since last September. I also have been convening regular roundtable discussions with the main retail grocery and distribution players since December to better understand contingency planning within the sector on food supply. Revenue, the Food Safety Authority of Ireland, Dublin Port and relevant Government Departments also attend these meetings. Furthermore, my Department has engaged with enterprises through the Brexit Consultation Forum and continues to host a series of Brexit information meetings in the Border Region in collaboration with the Accountancy Bodies of Ireland.

The UK’s exit from the EU will mean changes for Irish businesses. With less than 9 weeks to go to the 31 October withdrawal date, I urge businesses to accelerate their preparations and avail of the wide range of State supports on offer.  By taking the necessary practical steps, businesses will be better placed to address the challenges they may face and in doing so, they can help future proof their businesses and continue to trade with the UK and other EU Member States.

IDA Ireland Data

Questions (710, 711)

Jan O'Sullivan

Question:

710. Deputy Jan O'Sullivan asked the Minister for Business, Enterprise and Innovation the name and location of each IDA client company in County Meath; the number employed by each company to 31 December 2018; the level of employment grants provided by IDA to each identified client company in 2018; the number of IDA sponsored site visits to County Meath to date in 2019, in tabular form; and if she will make a statement on the matter. [34719/19]

View answer

Jan O'Sullivan

Question:

711. Deputy Jan O'Sullivan asked the Minister for Business, Enterprise and Innovation the name and location of each IDA client company in County Louth; the number employed by each company to 31 December 2018; the level of employment grants provided by IDA to each identified client company in 2018; the number of IDA sponsored site visits to County Louth to date in 2019, in tabular form; and if she will make a statement on the matter. [34720/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Business)

I propose to take Questions Nos. 710 and 711 together.

Regional development remains an absolute priority of mine. I am focused on supporting and sustaining existing regional employment while also working to create new economic opportunities and jobs in every county of Ireland. There are now over 230,000 people working in IDA client firms. Last year saw more IDA-supported jobs added in regional Ireland than at any time over the past 17 years, with 58% of total such employment now located outside of Dublin.  

With respect to grants, the IDA is authorised by my Department to provide a range of financial supports in the form of employment, capital, research and development, environmental and training grants. These grants are an important means of encouraging companies to invest in Ireland, particularly in regional locations. While IDA client companies in Meath received no employment grants in 2018, the Agency paid a total of €182,259 in training grants to two firms in the County.

Foreign direct investment (FDI) is growing in Louth and Meath. Both Counties, for example, experienced an increase of 4% in FDI-driven employment in 2018. While progress has been made in helping to generate new economic opportunities in Louth and Meath, the Government remains determined to achieve more. The IDA has a key role to play in this and the Agency is engaging with its clients, and with other enterprise agencies, to help create new jobs and source further investment.   

The following tables outline the number of IDA site visits to Counties Louth and Meath to date in 2019, the name and location and approximate employment ranges of each IDA client company and grants provided by the IDA in both counties in 2018.

Table A: IDA Ireland site visits to Counties Louth and Meath to date in 2019

   County  

Q1 2019  

Q2 2019  

   County  

Q1 2019  

Q2 2019  

Louth

10

9

Meath

1

1

Table B: List of IDA client companies in County Louth including location and employment ranges

NAME  

ADDRESS  

EMPLOYMENT RANGE  

EBAY EUROPE SERVICES (DUNDALK)

Xerox Technology Park, Dublin   Road, Dundalk Co   Louth

50-100

PAYPAL EUROPE SERVICES   (DUNDALK)

Xerox Technology Park, Dublin   Road Dundalk Co   Louth

1100-1200

WARNER CHILCOTT (IRELAND)   LIMITED

Building b, Xerox Technology   Park Dundalk Co.   Louth

50-100

BECTON DICKINSON & CO   LIMITED

Donore Road, Drogheda Co. Louth  

100-200

DIACEUTICS LIMITED

Creative Sparks, Clontygora Ct,   Dundalk Co. Louth

50-100

SATIR EUROPE (IRELAND) COMPANY   LIMITED

Marleys Business Park, Marleys   Lane, Drogheda Co.   Louth

50-100

ALMAC PHARMACEUTICALS GROUP   (IRELAND) LIMITED

Finnabair Business Park   Dundalk, Co. Louth

50-100

WASDELL IRELAND

Dundalk Science and Technology   Park Mullagharlin

50 - 100

WUXI BIOLOGICS IRELAND

Unit 3, One Market Square,   Dundalk

50-100

CHEMICAL INSPECTION AND   REGULATION SERVICE   LIMITED

20 Laurence Street, Singleton   House Laurence   Street Drogheda Co Louth

50-100

RADIO SYSTEMS PETSAFE EUROPE   LIMITED

2nd Floor Elgee Building Market   Square Dundalk   Co. Louth

50-100

GENPACT LIMITED

10 Earlsfort Terrace, Dublin

50-100

CARGOTEC

Ardee Road Dundalk Co. Louth

300-400

ABB LIMITED

Finnabair Industrial Park   Dundalk Co. Louth

50-100

NATIONAL PEN PROMOTIONAL   PRODUCTS LIMITED

Building D, Xerox Technology   Park Dundalk Co.   Louth

1100-1200

AMPHENOL TCS IRELAND LIMITED

The Mill Enterprise HubNewtown   Link Road   Greenhills, Newtown link Road Drogheda Co. Louth

50-100

ALLARD SUPPORT UK LIMITED

Coes Road, Dundalk Co. Louth

50-100

XEROX (EUROPE) LIMITED

Xerox Technology Park, Dublin   Road Dundalk Co   Louth

250-300

SMT FUND SERVICES (IRELAND)   LIMITED

Finnabair Business &   Technology Park, Dundalk   Co. Louth

50-100

MTI MERCHANDISING TECHNOLOGIES   IRELAND LIMITED

9-33 Magdalene street,   Ballsgrove Drogheda

50-100

GRAEBEL IRELAND

Ground Floor Building 3 Dundalk

50-100

ARMAC SYSTEMS LTD.

Unit 2 Southgate Centre, Cople   Cross Drogheda

50 -100

PCI SERVICES IRELAND (LOUTH)

Unit 4, Donore Road Industrial   Estate, Drogheda

50-120

KELLTON TECH IRELAND

The Mill Enterprise centre,   Newtown Link Road Drogheda  

1 to 50

VESTA PAYMENT SOLUTIONS LIMITED

Vesta Building, Finnabair   Business Park Dundallk,   Co. Louth

150 -200

SEACHANGE INTERNATIONAL

Vesta Building, IDA Finnabair   Business Park   Dundalk, Co. Louth

50 to 100

PROMETRIC IRELAND LIMITED

Building 3, Finnabair Business   Park Dundalk Co.   Louth

100 - 200

YAPSTONE EUROPE

Mellview House, M1 Retail Park   Drogheda Co Louth  

100-200

Table C: List of IDA client companies in County Meath including location and employment ranges

 

 

 

NAME  

ADDRESS  

EMPLOYMENT RANGE  

PCI Services Ireland (Meath)   City   north Campus

Block 7, City North Business   campus, Stamullen

50 - 100

International Fund Services

IDA Business Park, Drogheda Co.   Meath  

250-300

ArcRoyal

Virginia Road, Kells Co Meath

250-300

GENERALI LINK

IDA Business Park Navan Co.   Meath

150-200

Coca cola International Service  

Southgate Drogheda, Co. Meath

150-200

KUM IRELAND LIMITED

IDA Industrial Estate, Athboy   Road   Trim, Co. Meath

50-100

DOOSAN INFRACORE CO. LIMITED

Block B, Swords Business Campus     Swords, Co. Meath

50-100

INTANA ASSIST

IDA business park, Athlumney,   Navan   Co. Meath

150-200

SAICA IRELAND

Ballybin Road, Ashbourne Co.   Meath

150 -200

FRANKLIN PHARMACEUTICALS   LIMITED

Athboy Road, Trim Co. Meath

 50-100

Emerson Automation Solutions   (Clonee)  

Bracetown Business Park Clonee   Co.   Meath

50-100

KEMEK LTD

Clonagh, Enfield Co. Meath

50-100

WELCH ALLYN LIMITED

Navan Business Park , Dublin     Road  Navan Road Co. Dublin

50-100

TRIMFOLD ENVELOPES LIMITED

Duggan Industrial Estate, Trim   , Co.   Meath

50-100

ALLTECH BIOTECHNOLOGY CENTRE

Sarney, Summerhill Road   Dunbouyne Co.   Meath

150-200

SHIRE BIOMANUFACTURING

Piercetown, Dunboyne Co.   Meath 

50-100

MAFIC (BLACK BASALT) IRELAND   LIMITED

Kells Technology Park Virgina   Road   Co. Meath

50-100

GENERALI PAN EUROPE

Navan Business Park , Dublin     Road  Navan Road Co. Dublin

150 - 200

IM3 PTY LIMITED

Unit 9 Block 4, City North   Business   Park Stamullen Co. Meath

50-100

Table D: Grants provided to IDA client companies in Louth in 2018

Company      

Grant Type  

Amount €  

Armac Aerospace Ltd

Research, Development and   Innovation

136,041

Becton Dickinson and Company   Ltd

Employment

306,000

National Pen Promotional   Products Ltd

Employment

500,000

Prometric Ireland Ltd

Employment

40,000

Radio Systems Petsafe Europe   Ltd

Employment

203,000

Yapstone International Ltd

Employment

243,000

Total

 

1,428,041

Table E: Grants provided to IDA client companies in Meath in 2018

Company      

Grant Type  

Amount €  

Shire Pharmaceuticals Ireland   Ltd

Training

23,000

Wellman International Ltd

Training

159,259

Total

 

182,259

Skills Development

Questions (712)

Donnchadh Ó Laoghaire

Question:

712. Deputy Donnchadh Ó Laoghaire asked the Minister for Business, Enterprise and Innovation her views on the increasing incidence of automation in industry; the preparations being made here for same in order to ensure it does not have a deleterious effect on employment and working conditions and on industry; and if she will make a statement on the matter. [34733/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Business)

My Department and I are aware of the challenges and opportunities brought by the increasing incidence of automation in industry. A key Pillar of the Government's Future Jobs Ireland strategy is focussed on embracing innovation and technological change in order to ensure that our enterprises and our people are ready to adapt to the workplace of the future.

This Pillar is underpinned by a number of ambitions and key deliverables that will ensure that we are ready for the changes that the future will bring. Amongst these ambitions are the establishment of Top Teams to realise opportunities presented by technological changes and the move to a low carbon economy. Another ambition is focussed on the development of Transition Teams to assist the workers and sectors likely to be most challenged by our changing economy.

Future Jobs Ireland was informed by research my Department has been carried out in this area. In December 2018, the Expert Group on Future Skills Needs (EGFSN) published ‘Digital Transformation: Assessing the Impact of Digitalisation on Ireland’s Workforce’. This study assessed the impact of digitalisation on job roles and sectors across the economy in Ireland and highlighted the opportunities and challenges that this presents.

The report projects strong overall employment growth for the economy from 2018-2023. Whilst the report predicts the number of jobs lost to the adoption of digital technologies will increase steadily over the next decade, it expects that the majority of sectors will employ more people in 2023 than they did in 2018. The report notes that the result of increased digitalisation in the economy will be a slower increase in employment growth of the order of 46,000 jobs over the period.

The report further finds that one in three jobs in Ireland are at high risk of being disrupted by the adoption of digital technologies. Much of the disruption, however, will result in changes to job roles and tasks performed by individuals rather than job losses. This means that lifelong learning will become even more of an imperative and the report finds that there will be opportunities for many people to upskill within their current jobs.

The report highlighted how the Government is already acting to address the challenges and mitigate the negative impacts of automation on job numbers.

The report finds that Ireland has the opportunity to place itself at the forefront of digital technologies through ensuring adequate skills provision and capitalising on Ireland's significant ICT sector. It finds that existing Government policies and initiatives currently in place provide a solid foundation for response to the expected changes from the increased adoption of digital technologies. Table 1, as provided in the report, demonstrates the various ways in which the Government is acting to mitigate the impact of automation on job numbers.

Table 1 Current Policies and Initiatives in Place Addressing Five Key Areas of Focus 

 Key Areas

 Policies and Initiatives Addressing Areas

 Vision

National Digital Strategy

 Collaboration

R&D Technology Centres/Gateways

Innovation Partnerships

SFI Industry Fellowships

 Data

National Data Infrastructure

 Technology

Disruptive Technologies Innovation Fund

Industry 4.0 Strategy

 Skills

National Skills Strategy 2025

ICT Action Plan

National Digital Strategy for Schools

Skills for Growth Initiative

Spotlight on Skills

Skillnet Ireland

Springboard+

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Work Permits Eligibility

Questions (713)

Bernard Durkan

Question:

713. Deputy Bernard J. Durkan asked the Minister for Business, Enterprise and Innovation if persons (details supplied) can qualify for work permits and-or stamp 4; and if she will make a statement on the matter. [34798/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Business)

The Employment Permits Section of my Department informs me that not enough information has been provided to determine whether either of the persons (details supplied) qualifies for an employment permit.

In order to work in the State all non-EEA nationals require a valid employment permit unless exempt under permission from the Department of Justice and Equality.  In order to apply for an employment permit a non-EEA national must have secured a job offer for an eligible occupation from an Irish registered employer. 

The State's general policy is to promote the sourcing of labour and skills needs from within Ireland and other EEA countries. Where specific skills prove difficult to source within the State or EEA, an employment permit may be sought by an employer to hire a non-EEA national in line with the Employment Permits Acts and associated Regulations, which lay down in legislation the criteria in relation to the application, grant and refusal of an employment permit.

Details on how to apply for an employment permit are available on our website at the following link - https://dbei.gov.ie/en/What-We-Do/Workplace-and-Skills/Employment-Permits/.

My colleague, the Minister for Justice and Equality, has responsibility for issuing immigration permissions and visas.

Work Permits Applications

Questions (714)

Bernard Durkan

Question:

714. Deputy Bernard J. Durkan asked the Minister for Business, Enterprise and Innovation if consideration will be given to the application for a work permit by a person (details supplied); and if she will make a statement on the matter. [34799/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Business)

The Employment Permits Section of my Department informs me that not enough information has been provided to determine whether the person (details supplied) qualifies for an employment permit.

In order to work in the State all non-EEA nationals require a valid employment permit unless exempt under permission from the Department of Justice and Equality.  In order to apply for an employment permit a non-EEA national must have secured a job offer for an eligible occupation from an Irish registered employer. 

The State's general policy is to promote the sourcing of labour and skills needs from within Ireland and other EEA countries. Where specific skills prove difficult to source within the State or EEA, an employment permit may be sought by an employer to hire a non-EEA national in line with the Employment Permits Acts and associated Regulations, which lay down in legislation the criteria in relation to the application, grant and refusal of an employment permit.

Any application for an employment permit should comply with all of the legislative requirements for the particular employment permit type, including that the non-EEA national has the required immigration permission at the time of application. Immigration permissions are a matter for my colleague, the Minister for Justice and Equality, and any such queries should be directed to that Department. 

Details on how to apply for an employment permit are available on our website at the following link - https://dbei.gov.ie/en/What-We-Do/Workplace-and-Skills/Employment-Permits/ .

Ministerial Advisers Data

Questions (715)

Michael McGrath

Question:

715. Deputy Michael McGrath asked the Minister for Business, Enterprise and Innovation the name of each person employed as an adviser or special adviser to her and the Minister of State in her Department; the salary of each in tabular form; and if she will make a statement on the matter. [34839/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Business)

As Minister for Business, Enterprise and Innovation, I have employed the services of two Special Advisers, details of whom are available through the Department of Public Expenditure and Reform website, but which are set out as follows for the Deputy’s ease of reference.

Name   

  Role       

 Salary    

Ms Lucy Moylan

Special Adviser (Press)

PO Standard Scale

Mr Pauric Mc Phillips

Special Adviser (Policy) 

PO Standard Scale

The pay scale for Special Advisers is the Standard Principal Officer pay scale of which the current starting point is €87,325 with a maximum point of €107,399.   

This Department does not employ special advisors for the two Ministers of State.  

NB. Due to the fact that Minister Halligan’s responsibilities span two departments (this Department and the Department of Education and skills), the Special Adviser to John Halligan is employed by the Department of Education and Skills.

Co-operative Sector

Questions (716)

Michael McGrath

Question:

716. Deputy Michael McGrath asked the Minister for Business, Enterprise and Innovation the reason co-operative organisations are required to file accounts with the Registrar of Friendly Societies within three months of the accounting year end of the co-operative; her views on whether this is unreasonable in view of the amount of work involved in producing year end accounts for a co-operative and the holding of an AGM; her plans to change this deadline; and if she will make a statement on the matter. [34874/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Business)

The Industrial and Provident Societies Acts 1893-2018 provide the statutory regulatory basis in Ireland for the formation and general operation of co-operative societies. The current provisions on the deadlines for filing annual returns by co-operative societies are set out in section 14(2)(c) of the Industrial and Provident Societies Act, 1893 which requires that the annual return be submitted no later than:

- 31 October, where the date of its last published balance sheet falls between 1 January and 30 June, and

- 30 April, where the date of its last published balance sheet falls between 1 July and 31 December (of the preceding year).

These provisions date from 2014 when the Friendly Societies and Industrial and Provident Societies (Miscellaneous Provisions) Act 2014, which amended the 1893 Act, came into force and were introduced on foot of a public consultation held in 2009. It was considered at the time that the pre-2014 system was quite restrictive in that returns had to be made up to a date falling within the five-month period from September to January and all annual returns had to be submitted by the following 31 March to the Registrar of Friendly Societies. These statutory timing requirements, introduced in 1893 and 1913, caused difficulties for societies whose annual business cycles did not accord with those requirements such as dairy societies, which wished to bring their reporting year into line with the dairy production year ending March or April, depending the part of the country.

The current system allows annual returns to the registrar to be submitted by one of two dates during the year, depending on the date of a society's financial year, which gives societies freedom regarding their choice of year end and extends the timeframe for the submission of the return to between 4 to 10 months depending on the date the last balance sheet was published.

My Department is currently undertaking a root and branch review of the co-operative legislation. The purpose of the comprehensive review is to consolidate into one statute all existing industrial and provident societies legislation and modernise it to eliminate outdated provisions and align it with the realities of the 21st century business and regulatory environment. In this regard the Department conducted a public consultation on the operation and implementation of the co-operative legislation the results of which were published in 2018.

As part of the review the Department will consider, among many others, the annual filing obligations of societies. On foot of the review, I intend to bring forward a General Scheme of Bill consolidating and modernising the co-operative statutory code later this year. When published, stakeholders will have the opportunity to provide further comments on the General Scheme.

EU Agreements

Questions (717)

Michael Moynihan

Question:

717. Deputy Michael Moynihan asked the Minister for Business, Enterprise and Innovation if she has received communication from the EU Commission following the Taoiseach’s joint letter on the potential agreement on Mercosur. [28211/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Business)

As you are aware, the Taoiseach joined the leaders of France, Poland and Belgium on 17 June in writing to Commission President Juncker expressing our concerns regarding the potential inclusion of sensitive agricultural products in the EU-Mercosur negotiations which were, it seemed at the time, coming close to conclusion and which were, in fact, concluded on Friday, 28 June.

The letter outlined a shared Irish, French, Polish and Belgian position that:

- the quotas for sensitive agricultural products would not increase,

- the agreement includes guarantees concerning compliance with sanitary, phytosanitary, animal welfare and environmental standards,

- the certification and control of quotas is imported on the importer’s side, and

- the segmentation of quotas between high value beef parts and other beef parts is achieved

The Taoiseach, and other leaders, also sought reassurances that in order to mitigate any possible negative impacts on the agricultural sector, an ad hoc safeguard mechanism would be implemented.

While a written response has not yet been received to this joint letter, I understand from the Commission that a reply is intended to issue in due course. In the meantime, of course, the EU Commission and the Mercosur countries have concluded the negotiations and we continue to work with the Commission to fully assess the detail in the proposed Agreement.