Garda Data

Questions (289)

Jim O'Callaghan

Question:

289. Deputy Jim O'Callaghan asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the number of times support has been sought from and provided under the drug-related intimidation reporting programme since it was established; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [44206/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Justice)

Drug-related intimidation is an extremely serious issue which involves the targeting of persons who use drugs, or their family or friends in relation to a drug debt. It involves insidious and coercive behaviour directed at forcing compliance of another person against their will. The intimidation can be either explicit or implicit, involving actual, threatened or perceived threats of violence to a person or damage to property.

The threat of violence to enforce drug debt impacts people's lives greatly and can create an atmosphere of fear within communities, particularly those where there is a concentration of illicit drug markets. In many instances, such communities are already marginalised and are also having to contend with social and public disorder and other forms of criminality associated with the illicit drugs trade.

I understand from the Garda authorities that whether or not a family or loved one has paid these debts, this should not be a deterrent to seeking help, advice and support from An Garda Síochána.

As the Deputy will be aware, An Garda Síochána, in partnership with the National Family Support Network (NFSN), have developed a framework, ‘the Drug Related Intimidation Reporting Programme’, which is now been implemented on a National level since 2013, to assist persons who may be subject to the threat of drug related intimidation.

I am informed by the Garda authorities that there are currently 28 Inspectors nominated in this regard. They liaise directly with the local Superintendent in relation to each individual case, as required. I am further informed that there are 6 such inspectors in the Dublin Metropolitan Region; 7 in the North-Western Region; 8 in the Eastern Region; and 7 in the Southern Region.

I am informed that, in dealing with any complaint of drug related intimidation, or advice sought in relation to this issue, An Garda Síochána have the utmost regard to the safety and most effective means to afford the person or family subject to the threat, the best level of security, advice and support. I am further informed that confidentiality and security of the persons concerned are paramount for An Garda Síochána when dealing with reports under the Programme.

I consulted with An Garda Síochána in relation to the Deputy's query on the number of times support has been sought from and provided under the drug related intimidation reporting programme since it was established. I am informed by the Garda authorities that this information is highly sensitive and not suitable for release into the public domain.

Asylum Applications Data

Questions (290)

Darragh O'Brien

Question:

290. Deputy Darragh O'Brien asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the breakdown of the nationality of those seeking asylum being accommodated in Mosney; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [44222/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Justice)

My Department is responsible for offering accommodation and related services to international protection applicants while their claim for protection is being examined. Due to an unexpected rise in applications (figures are up 53% in the first nine months of this year), existing Direct Provision Centres, which offer accommodation, food, utilities and a suite of State services, have reached capacity.

I am advised that as of 20th October 2019, 7,537 persons were being provided with accommodation by the International Protection Accommodation Services (IPAS, formerly the Reception and Integration Agency) of my Department. Currently, there are 6,091 persons residing in the 38 accommodation centres located nationwide across 18 counties. As these centres are currently operating at full capacity, there are also a further 1,478 people being accommodated in emergency accommodation in hotels and guest houses. My Department does not disclose the location of emergency accommodation centres in order to protect the identity of international protection applicants.

There are currently over 700 people being accommodated in Mosney Accommodation Centre. Please see table below given breakdown of nationality of those seeking asylum being accommodated in Mosney.

Nationality of Mosney Residents as of 20th October 2019

Country Of Origin

Number of applicants

Albania

111

Nigeria

102

Pakistan

90

Zimbabwe

80

South Africa

56

Malawi

32

Congo DR

27

Syria

24

Iraq

18

Kosovo

13

Other

150

My Department has introduced a number of measures aimed at reducing the time taken to determine applications. The International Protection Act, 2015, introduced the single procedure process for the determination of protection applications. Under the single procedure all elements of a person's protection claim (refugee status, subsidiary protection status and permission to remain) are considered together rather than sequentially. The aim of the single procedure is to help reduce waiting times significantly.

An applicant who applies for international protection today can expect to receive a first instance recommendation/decision within approximately 15 months, provided that no complications arise. Prioritised cases are being processed in just under 9 months. Prioritised applications include those from countries such as Syria and Eritrea and from especially vulnerable groups of applicants, such as unaccompanied minors. My Department is aiming to reduce processing times for all first instance decisions to 9 months by the end of this year.

Youth Services Expenditure

Questions (291)

Jim O'Callaghan

Question:

291. Deputy Jim O'Callaghan asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the breakdown of spending under the Irish Youth Justice Service community programmes budget for 2019; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [44223/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Justice)

The statutory framework relating to young offenders and the Garda Diversion Programme is set out in the Children Act 2001. The nationwide network of Garda Youth Diversion Projects (GYDPs) is supported by my Department.

GYDPs are community based, multi-agency, crime prevention initiatives which primarily seek to divert young people who have become involved in criminal or anti-social behaviour. They aim to support young people to develop and mature through positive interventions and interactions with a local project. GYDPs provide a range of education and training programmes e.g. academic support, IT, employment preparation and specific job training.

Since 2015, GYDPs have been co-funded under the Programme for Employability Inclusion and Learning (PEIL) of the European Social Fund (ESF) 2014-2020.

My Department is pursuing an ambitious programme for the future development of GYDP services, working closely with community organisations and with expert support from the Research Evidence into Policy Programmes and Practice project in the University of Limerick.

The budget and breakdown of expenditure on GYDPs to date in 2019 is set out in the table below.

PROGRAMME

NUMBER OF PROJECTS

BUDGET 2019

EXPENDITURE 2019

GYDPs

106

€14,810,632

€13,592,030

LDTFs

4

€252,032

€245,502

Work to Learn

20

€137,869

€137,869

8-11

9

€248,958

€248,958

Family Support

11

€310,690

€310,690

TOTAL

€15,760,181

€14,535,049

Immigration Status

Questions (292, 295, 299, 308, 351, 362)

Róisín Shortall

Question:

292. Deputy Róisín Shortall asked the Minister for Justice and Equality his plans to address the needs of undocumented children and young persons living here; if he is considering a pathway to residency for them; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [44236/19]

View answer

Jim O'Callaghan

Question:

295. Deputy Jim O'Callaghan asked the Minister for Justice and Equality if a pathway to residency will be introduced for children and young persons who are undocumented here and wish to secure residency; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [44397/19]

View answer

Seán Haughey

Question:

299. Deputy Seán Haughey asked the Minister for Justice and Equality if he will consider regularising the status of undocumented children and young persons here with a view to granting them residency and the right to work; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [44430/19]

View answer

Michael McGrath

Question:

308. Deputy Michael McGrath asked the Minister for Justice and Equality if he will address a matter raised in correspondence (details supplied); and if he will make a statement on the matter. [44530/19]

View answer

Richard Boyd Barrett

Question:

351. Deputy Richard Boyd Barrett asked the Minister for Justice and Equality if changes will be made to legislation to ensure that there is a clear and quick pathway to residency for up to 3,000 children and young persons growing up here undocumented; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [45091/19]

View answer

Brendan Griffin

Question:

362. Deputy Brendan Griffin asked the Minister for Justice and Equality if he will address a matter regarding undocumented persons here (details supplied); and if he will make a statement on the matter. [45281/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Justice)

I propose to take Questions Nos. 292, 295, 299, 308, 351 and 362 together.

Entitlement to Irish citizenship is governed by the Irish Nationality and Citizenship Act 1956, as amended. The Act distinguishes between the entitlement to citizenship by birth and descent and to the acquisition of citizenship through the naturalisation process. Following a referendum of the Irish people, the 27th amendment to the Constitution changed the situation in relation to entitlement to Irish Citizenship. As a result, Section 6 of the Irish Nationality and Citizenship Act 1956 was amended by the Irish Nationality and Citizenship Act, 2004. The changes came into effect on 1st January 2005. As of that date a person born in the island of Ireland is not entitled to be an Irish citizen, unless that person's parents have been resident in the island of Ireland for a total of three years during the four years preceding that person's birth. Periods of unlawful residence, periods of residence which were for the sole purpose of having an application for refugee status determined or periods of residence where permission was granted for the purposes of study are excluded from the determination of periods of reckonable residence.

Where a child born in the State did not, at birth, have an entitlement to Irish citizenship, the parent or guardian or person who is in loco parentis to the child may lodge an application for naturalisation on behalf of the child if and when the conditions for naturalisation are satisfied, including a requirement to have a total of 5 years residence in the State. This ensures that, even where a child born in the State did not have an entitlement to Irish citizenship, there is a path to obtaining Irish citizenship through naturalisation.

I recognise that there are some cases of young people who have grown up here but who, as a result of their parents' illegal status, find themselves in a difficult situation. However, it is important to emphasise, that when it comes to people living here illegally, the only option for regularisation is on a case by case basis. Inevitably, granting permission to children and young people who reside in Ireland in an undocumented capacity will require that other family members must also be allowed to remain in order to care for and support the children. However, where people who have had an application for residence refused or who simply overstay their permission to reside in this country and do not apply for an extension to their permission, the State must be allowed to exercise its legal right to remove them from the State. It would be unwise to permit people to simply ignore our immigration laws and allow them and their families to remain here merely on the basis of the length of time that they have resided here without permission.

I am, however, open to exploring all legal solutions to the issue of children who have grown up here in circumstances where they or their family are undocumented. I met with the Migrant Rights Centre Ireland (MRCI) in June to discuss the situation and my Department has on-going engagement with MRCI and other NGOs on this matter.

In all cases, people must engage with the authorities if they wish to be permitted to remain here legally. I would encourage any person who is resident in the State without permission to contact the Immigration Service of my Department or their local immigration office and to take all appropriate steps to regularise their family's status.

Public Inquiries

Questions (293)

Catherine Murphy

Question:

293. Deputy Catherine Murphy asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the status of a scoping exercise in a case (details supplied); if terms of reference regarding an inquiry have been changed; his views on the terms of reference as they were put to him; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [44332/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Justice)

The circumstances surrounding the tragic death of Shane O'Farrell have previously been addressed by me in both the Dáil and the Seanad and I have met with the O'Farrell family.

Following the Dáil motion calling for a public inquiry last year, I sought the advice of the Attorney General on how best to proceed, given the fact that the Garda Síochána Ombudsman Commission was still investigating certain matters in relation to the case. Following the conclusion of the GSOC investigation, I appointed retired District Court Judge Gerard Haughton to conduct a scoping exercise into the circumstances leading to Shane's tragic death.

I am grateful to Judge Haughton for agreeing to undertake this sensitive and important work.

Judge Haughton subsequently met with the O'Farrell family to discuss the terms of reference and to seek their views. Following his engagement with the family, I received a proposal from Judge Haughton for some changes to the terms of reference for the scoping exercise.

This necessitated further consultation with the Office of the Attorney General. Subsequent legal advices were provided which, in particular, emphasised the requirement to abide by the jurisprudence set down in the decision of the Supreme Court in Shatter v. Guerin which was delivered in 2019.

I can confirm to the Deputy that the terms of reference of the scoping exercise have been finalised. My Department wrote to Judge Haughton on 23 September to ask him to begin his scoping exercise and to make an initial report by mid-November.

Judge Haughton is of course free to make any recommendation he sees fit, including the establishment of any form of statutory or non-statutory inquiry. Should he consider it necessary to recommend an inquiry, of whatever type, I have asked him to provide me with draft terms of reference.

While I regret that this process has taken some time, I am sure the Deputy will appreciate the importance of ensuring that the scoping exercise was framed and conducted in accordance with that decision. All of us in these Houses must operate within the new legal landscape of sensitive matters of this type, which are subject to the supervision of the Courts. I look forward to receipt of the initial report of Judge Haughton later this month.

Criminal Assets Bureau

Question No. 295 answered with Question No. 292.

Questions (294)

Jim O'Callaghan

Question:

294. Deputy Jim O'Callaghan asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the number of legal professionals seconded to the Criminal Assets Bureau in each of the years 2016 to 2018 and to date in 2019; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [44389/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Justice)

As the Deputy will be aware, the Criminal Assets Bureau (CAB) is a multi-agency statutory body established under the Criminal Assets Bureau Act 1996. The Bureau’s remit is to target a person's assets, wherever situated, which derive, or are suspected to derive, directly or indirectly, from criminal conduct. Since its inception, the Bureau has been at the forefront of fighting organised crime in this jurisdiction and disrupting the activities of criminal gangs by depriving them of ill-gotten assets.

The Bureau is widely regarded as a best practice model in the context of combating organised crime. It works closely with law enforcement bodies at national and international levels and continues to relentlessly pursue the illicit proceeds of organised crime activity. The actions of the Bureau send a strong message to criminals and to local communities that profiting from crime will not be tolerated.

Reflecting the Government's commitment to ensure that the Bureau is adequately resourced, the CAB’s staffing and budgetary allocation has increased significantly in recent years. Since 2016, the Bureau's staffing resources have increased from 71 to its current level of 85, with staff numbers due to rise to 91 during this year.

Similarly, the Bureau's budgetary allocation has gone up from €7.042 million in 2016 to €8.603m in 2019. The Bureau's budget for 2020 has been increased by a further €0.5 million, to a total of €9.1 million.

A Bureau Legal Officer is appointed to the Bureau by the Minister to assist the Bureau with its objectives and functions. Other than this statutory post, I am advised that there are no legal professionals formally seconded to the Criminal Assets Bureau and rather that the Chief State Solicitor's Office provides the necessary legal services to the Bureau in the operation of its role.

Question No. 295 answered with Question No. 292.

Garda Data

Questions (296)

Jim O'Callaghan

Question:

296. Deputy Jim O'Callaghan asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the number of inspectors appointed under the drug-related intimidation reporting programme to respond to the issue of drug related intimidation; the status of the programme; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [44402/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Justice)

The Garda Commissioner is responsible for the managing An Garda Síochána and for the allocation of Garda resources, in light of identified operational demands. This includes responsibility for personnel matters and the distribution of personnel. As Minister I have no direct role in these matters. I understand however that Garda management keeps the distribution of resources under continual review in the context of crime trends and policing priorities, to ensure their optimum use.

As the Deputy will be aware, all Gardaí have a responsibility in the prevention and detection of criminal activity whether it be in the area of drug offences, crime or otherwise. I can assure the Deputy that An Garda Síochána continues to proactively and resolutely tackle all forms of drug crime in this jurisdiction.

An Garda Síochána, in partnership with the National Family Support Network (NFSN), have developed a framework, ‘the Drug Related Intimidation Reporting Programme’, which is now been implemented on a national level since 2013, to assist persons who may be subject to the threat of drug related intimidation.

I am informed by the Garda authorities that there are currently 28 Inspectors nominated in this regard. They liaise directly with the local Superintendent in relation to each individual case, as required. I am further informed that there are 6 such inspectors in the Dublin Metropolitan Region; 7 in the North-Western Region; 8 in the Eastern Region; and 7 in the Southern Region.

Direct Provision Expenditure

Questions (297)

Seán Haughey

Question:

297. Deputy Seán Haughey asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the cost of the direct provision system in each of the years 2014 to 2018; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [44428/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Justice)

The International Protection Accommodation Service of my Department (IPAS) is provided with an annual budget under the vote of the Department of Justice to provide applicants for protection with accommodation for the duration of the application process. IPAS seeks to have accommodation and ancillary services provided under contract at centres located throughout the state.

As of 27 October 2019, 6,090 people are being accommodated in the 39 IPAS accommodation centres. There is a further 1,439 people being accommodated in emergency accommodation , namely in rooms in commercial hotels and guest houses on a room and full-board basis.

There are also an additional 347 people accommodated in Emergency Reception and Orientation Centres (EROC). The persons accommodated in these centres entered the State under the Resettlement Programme and Relocation Programme of the Irish Refugee Protection Programme (IRPP) operated by my Department.

The following table provides a breakdown of the IPAS expenditure on the ‘direct provision’ system in the years 2014 to 2018.

Expenditure Type

2014

2015

2016

2017*

2018*

Accommodation(includes commercial, State-owned and self-catering)

Emergency accommodation costs are included from September 2018 when such accommodation was first utilised.

€51.071m

€54.895m

€60.327m

€65.407m

€76.057

Pre-school (contributions towards some costs)

€0.101m

€0.127m

€0.112m

€0.095m

€0.107m

Additional costs at State-owned centres (incl. gas, oil, water, sewage, etc.)

€1.972m

€1.879m

€3.558m

€1.742m

€1.512m

Transport costs (under dispersal policy)

€0.046m

€0.103m

€0.129m

€0.093m

€0.182m

Miscellaneous (payments for nappies, grants to organisations and miscellaneous costs)

€0.027m

€0.021m

€0.011m

€0.022m

€0.135

Total Expenditure

€53.217m

€57.025m

€64.137m

€67.359m

€77.993m

The 2017 and 2018 figures include an amount of €7.728m and €7.550m respectively for designated Emergency Reception and Orientation Centres (EROC).

Asylum Applications Data

Question No. 299 answered with Question No. 292.

Questions (298)

Seán Haughey

Question:

298. Deputy Seán Haughey asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the number of asylum seekers granted refugee status in each of the years 2014 to 2018; the success rate in percentage terms relative to the overall number of applications in each of these years; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [44429/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Justice)

As the Deputy will be aware, applications for international protection are now processed at first instance, as part of a single application procedure, by the International Protection Office (IPO) which replaced the Office of the Refugee Applications Commissioner (ORAC). The staff of that Office (the Chief International Protection Officer and International Protection Officers) are independent in the performance of their protection functions. The International Protection Appeals Tribunal (IPAT) considers appeals against IPO refusals of international protection and the Tribunal is also independent in the performance of its functions

The IPO was established on 31 December 2016 following the commencement of the International Protection Act 2015 providing for the introduction of a single application procedure for people seeking international protection. The 2015 Act replaced the previous sequential application system with a single application process, for asylum, subsidiary protection and permission to remain in the State, bringing Ireland into line with the processing arrangements applicable in other EU Member States.

The number of asylum seekers granted refugee status in each of the years 2014 to 2018 are set out in the table below. However, the Deputy may wish to note that grants made in a particular year do not necessarily correspond with applications made in the same year.

Refugee Status Granted in the Years 2014 to 2018

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

International Protection Applications Received in the IPO

1448

3276

2244

2926

3673

Total Grants of Refugee Status/Subsidiary Protection by Ministerial Decisions Unit

478

562

727

768

1034

Grants Decisions Per Applications Received

33%

17%

32%

26%

28%

Question No. 299 answered with Question No. 292.

State Bodies Establishment

Question No. 301 answered with Question No. 280.

Questions (300)

Éamon Ó Cuív

Question:

300. Deputy Éamon Ó Cuív asked the Minister for Justice and Equality when the Mediation Council of Ireland will be established under the relevant mediation legislation; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [44463/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Justice)

The position is that the Mediation Act 2017 came into operation on 1 January 2018. Section 12 of the Act provides that, subject to certain conditions, the Minister for Justice and Equality may, by order, declare that a body as is specified in the order shall be recognised for the purposes of the Act as the Mediation Council of Ireland. The Schedule to the Act sets out the minimum requirements in relation to the Council including the functions of the Council – which include promotion of the mediation sector, the establishment of a register of mediators and the development of codes of practice – and its membership.

I understand that the Legal Aid Board has brought together an informal group to examine if consensus could be reached in relation to the possibility of putting together a proposal for the establishment of the Mediation Council. Following a number of meetings, a proposal from the informal group for the establishment of the Council has now been submitted and is under consideration in my Department. I expect that further discussions on the matter will be held in due course.

Question No. 301 answered with Question No. 280.

Human Trafficking

Question No. 303 answered with Question No. 279.

Questions (302)

Jim O'Callaghan

Question:

302. Deputy Jim O'Callaghan asked the Minister for Justice and Equality if he has met the Minister for Transport, Tourism and Sport to discuss migrant smuggling and the preventative measures needed to detect same. [44469/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Justice)

The incident referred to by the Deputy is a tragedy for all concerned and I have previously expressed my deepest sympathies and condolences to them in this House.

I can assure the Deputy that the Government is fully committed to addressing the challenges of human trafficking and migrant smuggling under Irish and EU legislation and the principal international conventions. We are active domestically and at the international level on these matters.

A range of Departments are relevant to these matters and An Garda Síochána also plays a key role in relation to the prevention and detection of human trafficking and migrant smuggling. As such, I discuss these matters with my Ministerial colleagues, including the Minister for Transport, Tourism and Sport, as required.

Question No. 303 answered with Question No. 279.

Refugee Resettlement Programme

Questions (304)

Fiona O'Loughlin

Question:

304. Deputy Fiona O'Loughlin asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the number of persons brought here under the EU relocation and the UNHCR-led refugee resettlement programmes who are living in emergency reception and orientation centres; the length of time they have been living in same; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [44471/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Justice)

Refugee and asylum seekers arriving in Ireland under the resettlement and relocation strands of the Irish Refugee Protection Programme (IRPP) are initially accommodated in Emergency Reception and Accommodation Centres (EROCs).

Two EROCs are currently in operation:

- The Abbeyfield Hotel, Ballaghaderreen, Co. Roscommon

- The Clonea Strand Hotel, Dungarvan, Co. Waterford

In addition, there are dedicated EROC places within the Mosney Accommodation Centre, due to its particular suitability for families. The table below sets out the current numbers and the average length of stay for each of the centres as of 4 November 2019.

EROC

CURRENT OCCUPANCY

AVG. LENGTH OF STAY

Abbeyfield Hotel EROC Ballaghaderreen, Co. Roscommon

203

174 days

Clonea Strand Hotel EROC Dungarvan, Co. Waterford

114

175 days

Mosney EROC Julianstown, Co. Meath

67

322 days

TOTAL

384

Of the 2,440 people who have arrived to date under the resettlement and relocation strands of the IRPP, more than 86% have been resettled in communities across Ireland.

Direct Provision Data

Questions (305)

Fiona O'Loughlin

Question:

305. Deputy Fiona O'Loughlin asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the number of persons residing in direct accommodation who have been granted an international protection status or a permission to remain; the efforts his Department is taking to find alternative accommodation for these persons; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [44488/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Justice)

I can inform the Deputy that there were, as of 31 October 2019, 778 people with status residing in Direct Provision. 'Status' means either those with an International Protection status, a Subsidiary Protection Status or Permission to Remain.

These people are no longer applicants and are no longer in the international protection process. They have the same right to housing assistance and supports as Irish nationals and EEA citizens.

People with status or permission to remain seeking accommodation in the wider community may apply for Housing Assistance Payments (HAP) from their local authority or they may wish to use other means to pay for their accommodation. My Department has engaged DePaul Ireland, the Jesuit Refugee Service and the Peter McVerry Trust to provide assistance to them to find accommodation. Information supplied to us by these organisations indicates that most people who find accommodation are availing of the HAP. In addition, my Department is working with other Government Departments, local authorities and the City and County Managers’ Association to help these people transition to longer-term accommodation in the community.

Consultancy Contracts Expenditure

Questions (306)

Catherine Murphy

Question:

306. Deputy Catherine Murphy asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the overall budget allocated for the project regarding fees paid to a consultancy in respect of the reorganisation of his Department; the sums paid to date on all aspects of same; the estimated projected costs to the conclusion of the project; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [44514/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Justice)

In January 2019, my Department commenced work on a major Transformation Programme. This programme was established on foot of the recommendations of the independent Effectiveness and Renewal Group (ERG) for a radical restructuring of the Department.

Given the scale and ambition of the programme, which involved moving from a conceptual design to a fully implemented new operating model within nine months, the ERG recommended the procurement of an external resource to assist the internal team in the Department to implement the transformation.

Following a competitive procurement process (supported by the Office of Government Procurement), EY were appointed to partner with the Department on the project.

The total cost that the Department will incur in respect to the consultancy fees regarding the reorganisation of the Department is €3,513,114. To date, the Department has paid €2,970,450 with the remaining balance of €542,664 to be paid in due course. Information on costs related to external consultant support is also available as a matter of public record on the Department website at http://www.justice.ie/en/JELR/Pages/WP15000153 under the ‘Timeline and key facts & figures’ heading. All costs quoted are inclusive of VAT.

Garda Data

Question No. 308 answered with Question No. 292.

Questions (307)

Jim O'Callaghan

Question:

307. Deputy Jim O'Callaghan asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the number of gardaí by rank that have been subject to disciplinary proceedings in 2017, 2018 and to date in 2019; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [44519/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Justice)

As the Deputy will appreciate, disciplinary matters within An Garda Síochána are governed by the Garda Síochána Act 2005 and the Garda Síochána (Discipline) Regulations 2007 and are a matter for the Garda Commissioner.

I am advised by the Commissioner that the below tables set out the number of Garda members by rank that were subject to disciplinary proceedings in each of the years in question.

Rank

2017

2018

2019*

Reserve Garda

1

1

0

Garda

174

152

122

Sergeants and above

15

14

14

TOTAL

190

167

136

* Figures for 2019 are based on information available to date, subject to change and do not represent a return for the year as a whole.

More generally and as the Deputy may know a review of Garda disciplinary arrangements, including the complaints process, is in line with the recommendations of the report on the Commission on the Future of Policing, and an action in relation to revision of the discipline system is included in "A Policing Service for the Future", the implementation plan for that report. A Discipline Review Steering Committee has been set up to oversee the process, and Terms of Reference have been agreed.

Question No. 308 answered with Question No. 292.