School Textbooks Code of Practice

Ceisteanna (141)

Luke 'Ming' Flanagan

Ceist:

141. Deputy Luke 'Ming' Flanagan asked the Minister for Education and Skills further to Parliamentary Question No. 103 of 27 February 2014, the reason boards of management of schools are now being asked to involve themselves in curriculum matters such as decisions on the use of workbooks; his plans to involve them in other teaching or curriculum matters; if he will advise the way the matter is resolved, when the chosen policy of the board of management, in respect of workbooks, is opposed by the principal and teachers in that school; his views that, it is undesirable that the board of management should be put on a collision course with the teachers who will always choose the use of workbooks because it makes their own job easier but at huge cost to parents; his views that possession and use of good textbooks give a sense of ownership of the subject to students; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [11829/14]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Education)

The Education Act, 1998, places a responsibility on boards of management to manage the school on behalf of the patron of the school and for the benefit of the students and parents, and to provide or cause to be provided an appropriate education for each student at the school. Boards of management, in exercising their function to ensure that an appropriate education is provided for students, have the authority to determine school policy on this matter. Teachers under the guidance of the senior management of the school must make decisions on the textbooks or workbooks to be used in line with the school policy determined by the board. No change has been made to these arrangements.

The Guidelines that accompany the "Primary School Curriculum, 1999" acknowledge that carefully selected textbooks may play a role in supporting the implementation of the curriculum but they also warn against an over-reliance on textbooks, stating, for example, in regard to history, that "it should be noted that textbooks, of their very nature, cannot adequately cover local history studies and should therefore be regarded as only one source among many for the teaching of history." I am conscious of the additional costs that may have to be borne by parents if workbooks are used extensively in schools and the "Guidelines for Developing Textbook Rental Schemes in Schools", published by my Department in 2012, outline a number of strategies that can be used to obviate the need for such workbooks.

School Equipment

Ceisteanna (142)

Marcella Corcoran Kennedy

Ceist:

142. Deputy Marcella Corcoran Kennedy asked the Minister for Education and Skills his plans to upgrade PCs in second level schools for the reason (details supplied). [11833/14]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Education)

My Department is aware of the issues in relation to Design & Communications Graphics subject equipment. The availability of funding to meet particular school needs is considered in the light of overall priorities and is subject to the availability of resources. I will keep the question of the provision of funding for this purpose under review. Steps have been taken to ensure that schools receive value for money when purchasing T4 CAD PCs and Notebooks. In this regard, schools may purchase off the Department of Finance's framework for PCs and notebooks and to facilitate this the Professional Development Service for Teachers - Technology in Education have put in place a drawdown agreement for PCs and notebooks with all the necessary specifications for Design and Communications Graphics.

School Curriculum

Ceisteanna (143)

Marcella Corcoran Kennedy

Ceist:

143. Deputy Marcella Corcoran Kennedy asked the Minister for Education and Skills his plans for the reform of the junior cycle (details supplied). [11834/14]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Education)

As the Deputy is aware, my officials are currently engaged in intensive discussions with the education stakeholders on the resources including the detailed modalities in relation to workload and implementation issues for schools and teachers; on quality assurance and teacher assessment and on the professional development required to support teachers and school leaders to implement the Junior Cycle. I expect to receive a detailed report on these issues from the National Working Group in May. The Deputy should note that CPD is currently being rolled out to English teachers and school leaders by the Junior Cycle for Teachers team. In fact, €4.8 million is being provided for the reform of Junior Cycle in Budget 2014.

Departmental Legal Costs

Ceisteanna (144)

Denis Naughten

Ceist:

144. Deputy Denis Naughten asked the Minister for Education and Skills if he will set out in tabular form, by reference to each named firm, the amount paid out in respect of legal fees during 2013 by his Department to law firms in or outside the State for services rendered to it; if he will provide in a similar format the amount paid out in respect of legal fees during 2013 by State bodies including commercial or non-commercial and regulatory bodies established by or under his Department, to law firms in or outside the State for services rendered to it; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [11869/14]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Education)

The payments made by my Department to legal firms during 2013 for services rendered to it are as follows:JD Scanlon Solicitors €258.30; Siobhan Fahy Solicitors €13,454.47; Patricia Martin Solicitors €4,044.90; A & L Goodbody Solicitors €8364.00; Arthur Cox Solicitors €12341.94. With regard to the public bodies under the aegis of my Department, arrangements and expenditure in relation to legal fees is an operational matter for each individual body and therefore the information requested is not collated centrally.

Sick Pay Scheme Reform

Ceisteanna (145)

Pat Deering

Ceist:

145. Deputy Pat Deering asked the Minister for Education and Skills the number of both primary and post-primary teachers who have exceeded the number of sick days as per the latest guidelines and as a result are no longer being paid by his Department when they are absent; if he can provide a breakdown of the figures per county; if the revised sick leave guidelines for teachers have resulted in less absenteeism in recent years; the number of teachers who have been referred to Medmark in the past three years; and the number of those teachers who have left the profession as a result of these referrals. [11892/14]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Education)

My Department has put in place an Occupational Health Strategy as a supportive resource for teachers and special needs assistants to promote their health in the workplace, with a focus primarily on prevention rather than cure. The Occupational Health Strategy comprises of the Employee Assistance and Occupational Health Services and caters for about 64,000 Teachers and 10,000 Special Needs Assistants (SNAs) in 4,000 Primary and Post Primary schools.

Medmark Occupational Healthcare is the current provider of occupational health services for teachers and SNAs. The Occupational Health Service encompasses health management and incorporates pre-employment health assessments, sickness absence management referrals, medical assessments of fitness for work and ill health retirement assessments and appeals. School authorities have responsibilities for ensuring the health, safety, well-being and educational progress of students. They also have a duty under Section 8 of the Safety, Health and Welfare at Work Act 2005 to "ensure, so far as is reasonably practicable, the safety, health and welfare at work of his or her employees". In order to discharge these management responsibilities effectively, it is essential that employers have access to professional occupational health advice on medical fitness. The Occupational Health Service is in place to assist employers and employees in the timely management of medical problems that arise in the context of work.

There are currently 81 Primary and 44 Post Primary teachers on unpaid sick leave. These figures are not broken down on a county by county basis. The number of referrals by schools to Medmark in 2011 was 1,289 and in 2012 was 1,842. Budget 2013 provided for the harmonisation of sick leave referrals with those in the civil service. This means that schools are required to refer teachers to the Occupational Health Service, after four weeks of sick leave resulting in the number of referrals increasing to 3,566 in 2013. The level of absenteeism due to sick leave has reduced in recent years with almost an 8% reduction in the past year.

Teachers, in accordance with the Education Act 1998, are employed by the school management authority of each individual school. Schools nominate eligible teachers for the payment of incremental salary grant and withdraw nominations on the departure of a teacher for whatever reason. My Department does not require that the school, when withdrawing a nomination, indicate the reason for that withdrawal.

Schools Building Projects Expenditure

Question No. 147 answered with Question No. 133.

Ceisteanna (146)

Dara Calleary

Ceist:

146. Deputy Dara Calleary asked the Minister for Education and Skills the amount of money spent on a proposed new school building project (details supplied) in County Mayo; if he will confirm if capital grant assistance towards a new school or devolved grant assistance was previously offered to the school management; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [11903/14]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Education)

Design team fees of just under €116,000 have been paid to date on the school building project referred to by the Deputy.The school was offered capital grant assistance in 2005 under a devolved scheme. However, the school subsequently declined this offer. Officials from my Department met with the school last month to discuss their accommodation needs. Subsequently, my Department wrote to the school on 26th February with the offer of a devolved grant to provide three mainstream classrooms. My Department is awaiting a response from the school.

Question No. 147 answered with Question No. 133.

State Examinations

Ceisteanna (148)

Martin Heydon

Ceist:

148. Deputy Martin Heydon asked the Minister for Education and Skills the progress to date in including politics and society as a leaving certificate subject; the timeline for inclusion of same; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [11922/14]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Education)

As you are aware I recently announced that I have decided to make the subject Politics and Society available to students as part of the suite of Leaving Certificate subjects. On foot of this, my Department recently wrote to the NCCA seeking its advice on a number of issues which need to be addressed before the subject can be made available since the NCCA completed a specification for Leaving Certificate Politics and Society in 2011. Until I receive advice from the NCCA I cannot give an implementation date. However, I plan to prioritise its introduction, once I have received the NCCA's advice, subject to the normal constraints on the system.

School Transport Provision

Ceisteanna (149)

Martin Heydon

Ceist:

149. Deputy Martin Heydon asked the Minister for Education and Skills if a review of the school transport system to a school (details supplied) in County Kildare will be carried out due to a number of concerns raised by parents of children attending the school; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [11924/14]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Education)

Changes to the Post Primary School Transport Scheme mean that from the 2012-13 school year, eligibility for all children newly entering a post primary school is determined by reference to the distance they reside from their nearest Post-Primary Education Centre having regard, as heretofore, to ethos and language. In general, existing eligible and catchment boundary children including those who are not attending their nearest post primary centre retain their transport eligibility for the duration of their post primary education cycle provided there is no change to their current circumstances. Siblings of these children and other children who are not eligible for school transport, may apply for transport on a concessionary basis in accordance with the terms of the Post Primary School Transport Scheme. Only children who are eligible for school transport and who hold valid medical cards (GMS Scheme) are exempt from paying the annual charge.

The changes to the Post Primary School Transport Scheme are being applied equitably on a national basis. Bus Éireann which operates the school transport scheme on behalf of my Department is responsible for the planning and organising of school bus routes, including the designation of the pick-up and set down points. Safety of children travelling on school transport services is of paramount importance to my Department and to Bus Éireann. Bus Éireann reviews existing services over the summer months. Arising from this review, routes may be altered or extended depending on the number and location of eligible children who will be availing of school transport for the following school year.

Special Educational Needs Data

Ceisteanna (150)

Finian McGrath

Ceist:

150. Deputy Finian McGrath asked the Minister for Education and Skills the number of children with a mild learning disability who are currently attending primary schools or receiving support under the general allocation model, GAM; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [11929/14]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Education)

I wish to advise the Deputy that all mainstream primary schools have been allocated additional teaching resources under the General Allocation Model (GAM) to cater for children with learning support needs and high incidence special educational needs, including mild, borderline mild general learning difficulties and specific learning disabilities. It is a matter for school authorities to determine how these hours are utilised to support eligible pupils. My Department therefore does not hold details of the number of pupils being supported within each category through this mechanism. I can, however, advise the Deputy that the General Allocation Model was designed to take into account an estimate of a prevalence of 1.5% of pupils within the school population having a mild general learning difficulty.

The NCSE recently published a report 'A study of the Prevalence of Special Educational Needs' which is available at www.ncse.ie and which contains details regarding the prevalence of special needs among the pupil population. I wish to advise the Deputy also that the NCSE report on Supporting Children with Special Educational Needs has recommended that under a proposed new allocation model, all children should be allocated additional resources in line with their level of need, rather than by disability category. The NCSE has established a Working Group to develop a proposal for consideration for a new Tailored Allocation Model, which is set out as one of the principal recommendations of the report. The Chairman of the Working group submitted his report to me on 5th March and I will now consider the report's recommendations.

Student Grant Scheme Eligibility

Ceisteanna (151)

Jonathan O'Brien

Ceist:

151. Deputy Jonathan O'Brien asked the Minister for Education and Skills the length of time a returned emigrant with Irish citizenship who had left Ireland for a period must be in the State before they will qualify for a Student Universal Support Ireland grant; and the length of time a person must be absent from the State that will render them unqualified for a SUSI grant payment. [11950/14]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Education)

I can confirm to the Deputy that under the residency requirement of the Student Grant Scheme, a student must have been resident in Ireland for at least 3 of the 5 years immediately prior to an approved course commencing in an approved institution in order to qualify for a grant. However, a student may qualify for a grant, having met the residency requirement during the course of their studies.

School Funding

Ceisteanna (152)

Brendan Ryan

Ceist:

152. Deputy Brendan Ryan asked the Minister for Education and Skills the models that are used to fund transition year in State-funded schools; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [11965/14]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Education)

The Department provides specific teaching resources and additional grant aid to schools that offer the transition year programme. Schools in the Free Education Scheme qualify for payment of a transition year grant of €95 for each pupil participating in the programme. The cost of transition year grants in 2013 was €2.88 million. The Department allocated circa 1,790 whole time equivalent teaching posts in the 2013-14 school year in respect of transition year with an estimated cost of €116 million.

School Enrolments

Ceisteanna (153, 154)

Brendan Ryan

Ceist:

153. Deputy Brendan Ryan asked the Minister for Education and Skills the enrolment procedures that are used by State-funded schools for students entering transition year; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [11966/14]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Brendan Ryan

Ceist:

154. Deputy Brendan Ryan asked the Minister for Education and Skills the procedures that are in place at departmental level to ensure fair enrolment policies are in place in State-funded schools for students entering transition year; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [11967/14]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Education)

I propose to take Questions Nos. 153 and 154 together.

The Transition Year, is a one-year programme designed to act as a bridge between the Junior Certificate and Leaving Certificate programmes. It is available to all second level schools. The management authority of each school carries responsibility for making decisions regarding the Transition Year Programme in that school. In some schools, the programme is compulsory for all students. In those that offer it as an option, circumstances may arise where it is necessary to limit the number of students who can avail of it. It is the board of management of each individual school that decides the number of places available to students on programmes such as Transition Year. In cases where restrictions apply, schools should have clear procedures regarding how places are allocated to students.

School Curriculum

Ceisteanna (155)

Brendan Ryan

Ceist:

155. Deputy Brendan Ryan asked the Minister for Education and Skills his position in relation to the transition year programme; if his Department believes in the universality of transition year; if so, the way his Department promotes this; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [11968/14]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Education)

The Transition Year is available to all second level schools but it is the board of management of each individual school that decides whether to offer the programme and if offered it decides on the number of places available to students on such programmes, depending on available resources. If offered, it also decides whether it is optional or compulsory for its students.

The Transition Year has many benefits for students in terms of experiencing a wide range of educational inputs and their personal and social development. However, research has found that it may not be suitable for all students. Retention to the end of senior cycle is our priority and some students may not wish to spend 3 years in senior cycle. Thus it is important that boards of management consider the choices that are available taking on board the educational needs of their students. My Department provides specific teaching resources and additional grant aid to schools that offer the Transition Year programme. An additional teacher allocation is given to each school offering the programme. Schools in the Free Education Scheme also qualify for payment of a Transition Year grant of €95 for each student participating in the programme.

School Curriculum

Ceisteanna (156)

Brendan Ryan

Ceist:

156. Deputy Brendan Ryan asked the Minister for Education and Skills if any studies have been conducted by his Department regarding the benefits for students who undertake transition year versus those who go straight from the junior certificate into the senior cycle. [11969/14]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Education)

The Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI) undertook a study for the National Council for Curriculum and Assessment in 2004 "The Transition Year Programme: An Assessment". The findings of this study would have been informed by their previous research in 2004. The 2004 study found that students who take Transition Year differ in a number of respects from those who do not take the programme. On average, students who took part in Transition Year achieved higher Leaving Certificate exam grades and were more likely to go on to higher education than non-participants.

First, students receive greater exposure to the kinds of subjects they will take for Leaving Certificate. Second, while being a year older does not seem to enhance academic performance the emphasis on self-directed learning and the perceived consequences of participation for maturity may enhance the study skills of students. Third, research has indicated higher academic performance among students who have had positive interaction with their teachers and a number of students reported improved relations with teachers as a result of taking part in the programme.

A number of negative findings were also highlighted by the ESRI. It was found that students who took part in the TY were more likely to work part-time in Senior Cycle and this tended to cancel out the performance gains associated with programme participation. The ESRI also noted that students in predominantly working-class schools where the programme was compulsory did not achieve higher Leaving Certificate grades than their counterparts who had not participated in TY. It was also noted that students in schools where Transition Year was compulsory tended to have higher drop-out rates than their counterparts in schools where it was not compulsory - because they may be unwilling participants in the programme.

Transition year is found to have definite academic benefits for students and is thought by the majority of principals nationally to have a positive impact on student development. I am currently awaiting the findings of the Irish Second Level Students' Union study of Transition Year which explores the students' experiences. My Department has funded this study.

Overseas Study Placements

Ceisteanna (157)

Dara Murphy

Ceist:

157. Deputy Dara Murphy asked the Minister for Education and Skills if grants are available for Irish citizens living abroad who wish to study abroad; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [11979/14]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Education)

I can confirm to the Deputy that students who are attending an approved undergraduate course in an EU Member State, can apply for a maintenance grant in respect of an approved course which is being pursued in an approved institution. Under the residency requirement of the Student Grant Scheme, a student must have been resident in Ireland for at least 3 of the 5 years immediately prior to an approved course commencing in an approved institution in order to qualify for a grant. However, a student may qualify for a grant, having met the residency requirement during the course of their studies.

Apprenticeship Programmes

Ceisteanna (158)

Ann Phelan

Ceist:

158. Deputy Ann Phelan asked the Minister for Education and Skills his views on the introduction of a flat rate fee for apprentices attending the various institutes of technology, as part of their apprenticeship (details supplied); and if he will make a statement on the matter. [11996/14]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Education)

The Annual Student Contribution is levied on apprentices and students attending Institutes of Technology. This contribution has been levied by Institutes of Technology in respect of apprentices since 2004, with FÁS/SOLAS paying 70% of the contribution and apprentices themselves paying the remainder. As part of Budget 2014, SOLAS will cease making this payment to the Institutes of Technology and apprentices themselves will pay the full pro rata Annual Student Contribution. From January 2014 up to the end of the academic year in June, apprentices will be due to pay €833 (1/3 of €2,500) per typical attendance block of 10 weeks. The exam fee is included in this payment.

Apprentices will pay the same contribution as students, apportioned for the time they spend in the Institutes. Apprentices are not eligible for grants under the Student Grant Scheme as they do not meet the funding condition of participating in an approved full-time course in an approved institution. Unlike students, apprentices are paid a training allowances by SOLAS for phases of their training spent in Institutes of Technology. This allowance is equivalent to the wages they receive from their employers for on the job phases and is unaffected by the budgetary changes.

Special Educational Needs Service Provision

Ceisteanna (159, 160, 161, 163, 164)

Thomas P. Broughan

Ceist:

159. Deputy Thomas P. Broughan asked the Minister for Education and Skills further to Parliamentary Question No. 94 of 27 February 2014, if he will reconcile his reply that it is a matter for schools to determine the approach or mix of approaches which they will use with the Department’s policy document entitled Model A which includes the requirement that the class teacher would receive ABA training prior to taking responsibility for the class. [12018/14]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Thomas P. Broughan

Ceist:

160. Deputy Thomas P. Broughan asked the Minister for Education and Skills further to Parliamentary Question No. 94 of 27 February 2014, if he will clarify the reason information is not available on whether ABA is used in early intervention classes for children with autism and the extent to which it is used in view of the fact that schools providing these classes are in receipt of departmental funding and would be inspected by officials from the Department. [12019/14]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Thomas P. Broughan

Ceist:

161. Deputy Thomas P. Broughan asked the Minister for Education and Skills further to Parliamentary Question No. 94 of 27 February 2014, if he will clarify his reply that it is a matter for schools to determine the approach or mix of approaches which they will use and explain whether it is the board of management, the principal or the class teacher in a given school that ultimately has legal responsibility for the selection of the approach or mix of approaches for a child who has autism. [12020/14]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Thomas P. Broughan

Ceist:

163. Deputy Thomas P. Broughan asked the Minister for Education and Skills if the requirement detailed in his Department’s policy document entitled Model A that there would be advice and supervision from an ABA specialist made available to the class teacher, is actually in place and operational in schools educating children with autism. [12045/14]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Thomas P. Broughan

Ceist:

164. Deputy Thomas P. Broughan asked the Minister for Education and Skills if he will confirm that he has read the report dated 5 September 2005 prepared by an international expert and selected by his Department and if he has specifically read the specific extracts from experts (details supplied) included in that report that relate to two pieces of research; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [12046/14]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Education)

I propose to take Questions Nos. 159 to 161, inclusive, 163 and 164 together.

I previously outlined for the Deputy how my Department's policy is to promote a child-centred approach to the education of children with special education including autism. The document referred to by the Deputy is outdated in that it refers to specific models of provision. My Department's policy is to provide for children with special educational needs, including autism, to be included in mainstream schools unless such a placement would not be in their best interests or the interests of the children with whom they are to be educated. Some children may be supported in a special class attached to a mainstream school. These students have the option, where appropriate, of full/partial integration and interaction with other pupils.

Other children may have such complex needs that they are best placed in a special school. Students with special educational needs have access to a range of support services including additional teaching and/or care supports. In special schools and special classes, students are supported through lower pupil teacher ratios. Special needs assistants may also be recruited specifically where pupils with disabilities and significant care needs are enrolled. I wish to advise the Deputy that my Department provides for a comprehensive system of continuing professional development (CPD) for teachers in the area of special educational needs including teachers of children with autism. Central to this is the Special Education Support Service (SESS) which was established in September 2003. The brief of the SESS is to enhance the quality of learning and teaching of students with special educational needs through the provision of CPD and support for teachers in mainstream schools, primary and post-primary special schools, and special classes.

My Department's position is that as each child with autism is unique, they should have access to a range of different approaches to meet their individual needs. Applied Behavioural Analysis, or ABA, is one of the approaches used in special classes for children with autism. The use of ABA as part of the range of interventions is particularly useful for addressing behavioural issues. My Department supports the use of ABA and training is provided for teachers in its use. However, the Department does not accept, based on research, advice and best practice, that ABA should be the only approach used. While ABA helps to improve behaviour, other approaches such as the Treatment and Education of Autistic Communication Handicapped Children approach and the Picture Exchange Communications System are just as important in developing children's communication and speech skills. It is important that children have access to a range of approaches so that their broader needs can be met. As children differ significantly from one another and as children's needs vary and change over time, it is not possible to impose a method or approach that will work for all children with autism.

This child-centred approach is based on advice received from international experts on autism, NEPS, the Inspectorate and the report of the Irish Task Force on Autism. I have not personally read the research to which the Deputy refers. However, the National Council for Special Education's 2009 publication "International Review of the Literature of Evidence of Best Practice Provision in the Education of Persons with Autism Spectrum Disorder" makes reference to both experts referred to by the Deputy. The Deputy will be aware that the NCSE is currently developing policy advice on the educational provision for children with autism which is being prepared at my request. The SESS has a number of teams involved in the provision of CPD and support to teachers of students with challenging behaviour; the Challenging Behaviour Team, the Autism Team and the Contemporary Applied Behaviour Analysis Team. One full-time SESS team member holds a BCBA qualification with three others currently having post-graduate qualifications in this area.

As outlined in my previous response, it is a matter for schools to determine the approach or mix of approaches which they will use in each individual case. In accordance with the provisions of the Education Act 1998, the Board of Management is the body charged with the direct governance of a school. In general, the Board has the responsibility to ensure that the school operates efficiently and effectively. However, it is the Class Teacher and, to a lesser extent, the Principal, who interact with the children on a daily basis. The approach towards each child's education would be based on the individual educational needs of the child and would have regard to the child's individual education plan and supporting professional reports, etc. and would require the interaction of all school personnel involved in the provision of education to the child. Details on the numbers of early intervention classes for children with autism who use ABA are not available as this information, while available in individual schools, has not been collated by my Department.