Question No. 138 answered with Question No. 130.

School Guidelines on Mental Health

Ceisteanna (139)

Bernard Durkan

Ceist:

139. Deputy Bernard J. Durkan asked the Minister for Education and Skills the extent to which he remains satisfied regarding the level of assessment and support for children and adolescents suffering from mental stress at various schools here and in County Kildare, specifically having regard to local evaluation of the need; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [5217/18]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Education)

My Department is strongly supportive of the promotion of positive mental health awareness in schools. The Department adopts a holistic and integrated approach to supporting the work of schools in promoting positive mental health and to supporting those with the broad range of problems, behavioural, emotional and social.

The processes span the curriculum in schools, whole-school ethos, quality of teaching, learning and assessment, student support and pastoral care and the provision of professional development for teachers. It also involves other supports such as educational psychological services and guidance and counselling services, and the interface with other agencies, both nationally and locally. Schools also engage in a wide range of sport and cultural co-curricular activities which provide an important opportunity for students to experience success and personal growth.

Wellbeing Guidelines for Post-Primary (2013) and Primary Schools (2015) have been developed by my Department in collaboration with the Department of Health and the Health Service Executive. The guidelines are informed by consultation with key Education and Health partners and by the findings of research. They provide practical guidance to schools on how they can promote mental health and well-being in an integrated school-wide way and they also provide evidence-based advice on how to support young people who may be at risk.

The Guidelines build on the significant work already taking place in schools, including through the Social, Personal and Health Education (SPHE) curriculum, the whole-school guidance plan, the National Educational Psychological Service (NEPS) continuum of support model and the HSE, Health Promoting Schools process. Information is also provided on how to access support from the SPHE Support Service and other external agencies and support services.  In addition Wellbeing Guidelines have been produced for the Junior Cycle Programme introduced in September 2017. This include a focus on mental health promotion. Professional development is currently being provided for schools in anticipation of this.

A range of external resources and initiatives are available to assist schools, among others, in supporting various aspects of a positive mental health process or relating to suicide prevention and crisis intervention such as the example instanced by the Deputy in his question.

The guidelines advise that in the event of pupils presenting with mental health difficulties which are above and beyond the school's capacity and ability to support, school authorities should identify and access the referral pathways for the various primary and secondary healthcare services in their particular area. My Department's National Educational Psychological Service (NEPS) is available to advise schools on the matter. Referrals should, of course, be undertaken with Parental or Guardian consent and collaboration, except in an exceptional situation where there may be child protection issues. In normal circumstances referral to the Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service (CAMHS) is made through the student's GP. I hope this clarifies the issue for the Deputy.

My Department liaises extensively with the Department of Health and its agencies in relation to the rationalisation and co-ordination of mental health services at national, regional and local level. This liaison has resulted in the development of operational protocols for co-operation between services and clarification of referral pathways for accessing mental health services.  Awareness building for schools in mental health and well-being is supported by the health sector through overarching initiatives such as Healthy Ireland and Health Promoting School initiative. At a more focussed level my Department in collaboration with the HSE’s National Office for Suicide Prevention (NOSP) has recently commenced a pilot programme of training in SafeTALK (suicide awareness skills) on a voluntary basis for teachers.  The Learning from this pilot phase will help determine the appropriate training needs for teachers at primary and post primary level.  

Within my Department’s Action Plan for Education in 2016/19 mental health and well-being is afforded a justifiably high priority and is one of the key goals. The actions relating to well-being and mental health include:

- Delivery of support all schools to implement the national Wellbeing in Post Primary Schools Guidelines for Mental Health Promotion and Suicide Prevention (2013 and the Well-being in Primary Schools Guidelines for Mental Health Promotion (2015)). 

- Introduction of Wellbeing as a subject at Junior Cycle: Guidelines on Wellbeing in Junior Cycle have been developed by the National Council for Curriculum and Assessment (NCCA) to support the Framework for Junior Cycle 2015. The guidelines will be introduced to post-primary schools in September this year.  The Junior Cycle team are currently planning the support that will be in place for the implementation of the well-being Curriculum.

- Increasing the capacity of NEPS: an enhanced educational psychological service to schools, through the appointment of an additional 11 educational psychologists.  The focus of this additional support will be on extending the roll-out of teacher programmes to DEIS schools that build capacity to promote social and emotional competence, resilience and school connectedness in all learners.

- Enhancing Guidance Provision at post-primary level: Recent budgets saw improvements in guidance allocation to schools, with Budgets 2016 and 2017 together seeing the allocation of the equivalent of 400 guidance posts, following budget measures in 2012 which removed the ex-quota provision for guidance posts (which amounted to some 600 posts).  The 400  guidance posts which have now been restored will be allocated separately and transparently once again.

As stated above the Guidelines themselves form a framework within which a broad range of existing processes and practices can be rationalised within schools and brought to bear within the context of a cogent well-being and mental health support for pupils in schools.  Support to the school community in this regard is being provided from a number of sources within my Department including the National Educational Psychological Service (NEPS), the Professional Development Service for Teachers (PDST) and the Junior Cycle for Teachers (JCT).

I hope this clarifies the matter for the Deputy.

Health Services

Ceisteanna (140)

Bernard Durkan

Ceist:

140. Deputy Bernard J. Durkan asked the Minister for Education and Skills the extent to which comprehensive school medical examinations remain in place with a view to ensuring early diagnosis and treatment in respect of conditions detected; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [5218/18]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Education)

My Department does not operate the schools medical examinations service and I am not therefore in a position to comment on the matters raised by the Deputy.

These matters are therefore appropriate to my colleague, the Minister for Health.

Apprenticeship Data

Ceisteanna (141)

Niall Collins

Ceist:

141. Deputy Niall Collins asked the Minister for Education and Skills the number of persons enrolled in apprenticeships in his Department and State agencies under his remit by gender in tabular form; and the detail of each such apprenticeship. [5255/18]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Education)

Civil Servants are appointed to my Department following competitions conducted by the Public Appointments Service (PAS). Candidates are required to display that they hold certain skill sets that will enable them to carry out the duties associated with the Civil Service grade structures.

There are no positions at my Department that would fall into the category of an apprentice and as such no persons are enrolled. In relation to agencies under the remit of my Department this information in not recorded centrally. Therefore, I have requested officials at my Department to collate the information and it will be forward to the Deputy in due course.

The Deputy will be interested to note that the Government will be working to expand public sector engagement with apprenticeships.  This will begin with taking on apprentices in the ICT area, following the validation of two ICT apprenticeships led by the ICT industry body, Fasttrack to Information Technology (FIT) in 2017.  The programmes, which will involve recruitment by both private sector and public sector bodies, are expected to commence in the first half of 2018.

School Enrolments

Ceisteanna (142)

Niall Collins

Ceist:

142. Deputy Niall Collins asked the Minister for Education and Skills if his attention has been drawn to the serious concerns of the local community in respect of the enrolment policy of a college (details supplied); if his attention has been drawn to the fact that the criteria for enrolment set out by his Department is creating serious difficulties particularly as the local community had always been of the view that local students would be given priority; if assurance will be provided in the matter; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [5280/18]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Education)

It is the responsibility of the managerial authorities of all schools to implement an enrolment policy in accordance with the Education Act, 1998.

My Department's main responsibility is to ensure that schools in an area can, between them, cater for all pupils seeking school places in the area.

Parents can choose which school to apply to and where the school has places available the pupil should be admitted. However, in schools where there are more applicants than places available a selection process may be necessary.

In this regard, a Board of Management may find it necessary to prioritise enrolment of children from particular areas or particular age groups or on the basis of some other criterion. For example, some schools give priority to applicants who have attended a particular primary school (known as a feeder school). The criteria to be applied by schools in such circumstances are a matter for the schools themselves.

This selection process and the enrolment policy on which it is based must be non-discriminatory and must be applied fairly in respect of all applicants. However, it may result in some pupils not obtaining a place in their school of first choice.

In relation to the school in question I can confirm that the construction of a new 1,000 pupil Post Primary School in Kingswood commenced on 28th August 2017 and that, subject to no issues arising, the school, which comes under the remit of the ETB, should take approximately 24 months to complete. Temporary accommodation was provided on site to allow the school to open in September 2016.

All new schools established since 2011 to meet demographic demand are required to enrol children from within the designated school planning area which the school was established to serve. This does not preclude schools from enrolling pupils from outside of the designated school planning area, rather it reflects the need to accommodate in the first instance the demographic for which the school was established.

Student Universal Support Ireland Administration

Ceisteanna (143)

Catherine Murphy

Ceist:

143. Deputy Catherine Murphy asked the Minister for Education and Skills the rationale for assessing a carer's respite grant as a source of income for a carer in respect of an income assessment for a SUSI grant application in respect of their dependants; if his attention has been drawn to the fact that the respite grant is paid in respect of therapeutic services and residential respite care for the person being cared for to allow the carer to take a one week break per calendar year; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [5283/18]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Education)

I understand from the Department of Employment Affairs and Social Protection that the Respite Care Grant name was changed in 2016 to the Carers Support Grant to better reflect how the grant is used by carers. Carers can now use the grant in whatever way they wish, it may be used to pay for respite care or other services, but it is not a requirement to do so.

Under the terms of the student grant scheme, the Carers Support Grant is treated as an income disregard where it is paid to recipients of the Carers Allowance and the Domiciliary Care Allowance and is therefore not included in the calculation of reckonable income. Carers Allowance and Carers Benefit are also qualifying payments for the special rate of grant.

If an individual applicant considers that she/he has been unjustly refused a student grant on the grounds of his/her initial classification as an independent or dependent student, she/he may appeal, in the first instance, to SUSI. Where an individual applicant has had an appeal turned down in writing by SUSI and remains of the view that the scheme has not been interpreted correctly in his/her case, an appeal, outlining the position may be submitted by the applicant to the independent Student Grants Appeals Board at www.studentgrantappeals.ie within the required timeframe.

Teacher Recruitment

Ceisteanna (144)

Catherine Martin

Ceist:

144. Deputy Catherine Martin asked the Minister for Education and Skills the timeframe for the establishment of a steering group to examine teacher supply shortages as reported in the media (details supplied); the proposed members of this group; the terms of reference for this group; the date on which the report from this group will be published; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [5285/18]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Education)

As the Deputy will be aware, I intend to establish a Teacher Supply Steering Group to implement a strategy to deal with issues being faced by primary schools in hiring substitute teachers and issues at post primary level regarding reported difficulties for schools hiring in certain subject areas. As part of its remit, the Group will consult with key stakeholders. The membership and terms of reference of the Steering Group are being finalised.

Creative Ireland Programme

Ceisteanna (145)

Richard Boyd Barrett

Ceist:

145. Deputy Richard Boyd Barrett asked the Minister for Education and Skills his plans for a theatre in education organisation; his further plans to design a programme for bringing professional theatre makers into the classroom as has been done with the music generation; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [5289/18]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Education)

In December 2016 the Government approved a new five-year initiative entitled Clár Éire Ildánach/Creative Ireland Programme, as a legacy project arising from the Ireland 2016 Centenary Programme. The Programme is an ‘all-of-Government’ initiative to mainstream creativity in the life of the nation.  The underlying proposition is that participation in cultural activity drives personal and collective creativity, with significant implications for individual and societal well-being and achievement. There are five pillars of the Creative Ireland Programme.

The Pillar 1 plan is Creative Youtha plan to enable the creative potential of every child and young person. This plan – Creative Youth – is about securing an opportunity for our children and young people to become creative citizens. The Department of Education and Skills has a key role in implementing Pillar 1, and is working in partnership with the Department of Culture, Heritage and the Gaeltacht, the Arts Council, and the Department of Children and Youth Affairs.

The Óige Ildánach/Creative Youth Plan was launched by An Taoiseach in early December 2017. The Creative Ireland Pillar 1 commitment is to ‘enable every child in Ireland to have practical access to tuition, experience and participation in music, drama, art and coding by 2022.’ The Creative Youth plan sets out four high level strategies to work under in the coming years:

1. Supporting collaboration between Formal and Non-Formal approaches to Creativity in Education

2. Extending the Range of Creative Activities for our Young People

3. Embedding the Creative Process

4. Continuing Professional Development (CPD)

Seventeen actions have been identified for 2018/19 under the Creative Youth Plan. These actions are either the expansion of existing pilot initiatives or new programmes being piloted and encompass some of the commitments in the Arts in Education Charter. The following actions are among those included in the plan, at least part of which may be drama and theatre-based initiatives:

- Scoileanna Ildánacha/Creative Schools initiative will be implemented.

Formerly developed as ARÍS under the Arts in Education Charter, Creative Schools will be piloted in 150 schools across two academic years. As part of the programme, schools will work with Creative Associates (a mixture of teachers and artists) to reinforce the impact of arts and creativity on student learning and development. They will work in partnership schools, clustered by region, to develop the knowledge, expertise and approaches that will embed each school’s creative practice, providing a mechanism for these schools to share learning with other schools.

- A Creative Clusters scheme will be piloted.

This initiative is still being scoped out. However, it is envisaged that it will commence in September 2018 as a pilot project.  This opportunity for schools to form clusters will be made available in order to generate creative cultural and artistic projects. Cluster meetings will be held in Education Centres, with each cluster consisting of a range of primary and post-primary schools. Seed funding would be provided to clusters based on the number of participating schools to allow them to progress projects.  This scheme will be funded under my Departments School Excellence Fund.

- Youth Theatre

There are currently 55 youth theatres in Ireland: the target is to substantially expand this number by 2022, commencing in 2019.

- Local Creative Youth Partnerships will be established on a pilot basis.

Building on the model for Local Arts Education Partnerships contained in the Arts in Education Charter, Local Creative Youth Partnerships will be established to provide support and delivery mechanisms for optimisation of local creativity resources. As part of this, new and existing collaborative youth creativity initiatives across the country, will be able to apply for funding, based on provided guidelines, administered through the ETB network. Successful applicants will be determined by local committees which will consist of a range of representatives from Local Authorities, ETBs, and local arts and community representatives. The concept will be piloted in three ETB areas in 2018.

- A National Creativity Fund will be established.

Intended to primarily provide financial support for organisations that promote creative activities for young people that may not be eligible for other agency funding and that have capacity for significant scaling. The Fund will be established by the end of Quarter 2 in 2018.

Legal Services Regulation

Ceisteanna (146)

James Browne

Ceist:

146. Deputy James Browne asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the position regarding the establishment of the Legal Services Regulatory Authority; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [4983/18]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Justice)

I have set out the current position in relation to the establishment of the Legal Services Regulatory Authority in my Written Reply to Questions 509 and 573 of 16 January 2018 which I will therefore reiterate on this occasion.

The setting-up of the Legal Services Regulatory Authority has been under way on a number of fronts since July 2016. At that time Parts 1 and 2 of the Legal Services Regulation Act 2015 were commenced as necessary to get the new Authority appointed and underway. The Authority, which is independent in the performance of its functions under the 2015 Act, has convened regularly since its inaugural meeting on 26 October 2016 - minutes of its meetings are available on its website www.LSRA.ie.

During its initial year of establishment, the Legal Services Regulatory Authority has been deeply engaged in the conduct of public consultations and in the making of five reports on a series of new options for the provision of legal services under sections 118 to 120 of the Act which were also commenced. It had been obliged to complete these within strictly set deadlines running from its day of establishment on 1 October 2016. All of these reports have now been laid, as required under the 2015 Act, before the Houses of the Oireachtas while also being publicly accessible on the Authority’s website.

As reflected in the 2015 Act and the relevant reports completed by the Authority, the Government continues to give policy priority to the introduction of Legal Partnerships by way of structural reform of the legal services sector. It is appreciated that this places additional working demands on the Authority which has, nonetheless, been consulting with the legal professional bodies and conducting workshops in preparation for their introduction.

Alongside its ongoing consultation and reporting commitments, the current working focus of the Authority is, I understand, very much on the managed roll-out of its remaining functions. This includes the matching development of the organisational capacities and office and staffing resources essential to effective delivery. It also includes the necessary preparatory steps for the establishment and application of the new Roll of Practicing Barristers under which both Law Library and non-Law Library practicing barristers will be regulated, for the first time under legislation, by the Authority. This will also be a pre-requisite for the exercise by the Authority of its public complaints functions. A further key area under development is that of the application of the levy that is to be made on both practicing solicitors and practicing barristers under Part 7 of the 2015 Act. Funding support of €1 million has recently been provided to the Authority from the Justice Vote for 2017. This follows an advance of the same amount that was provided from my Department’s 2016 Vote.

It should also be recalled that in parallel to the introduction of enhanced legal costs transparency obligations on legal practitioners under the 2015 Act, extensive legal and technical preparations are also continuing separately within the courts system to complete the transition of the Office of the Taxing-Master to that of the Legal Costs Adjudicators.

Following these steps, the key structural reforms of Part 6 of the 2015 Act relating to public complaints, professional conduct and the appointment of the Legal Practitioners' Disciplinary Tribunal dealing with both solicitors and barristers, will be commenced. It is considered that this component of the Act will underpin the entire new regulatory regime in terms of its observance and enforcement. I will, of course, continue to emphasise the importance which I attach as Minister to the objective of getting the Authority open for business on the core public complaints function as quickly as is reasonably possible while also bearing in mind the risks and complexities which must be carefully managed to bring that about.

The Regulatory Authority is actively preparing to conduct the first periodic review of the operation of the Legal Services Regulation Act 2015 as required under section 6 of that Act. This must be commenced not later than eighteen months after the Authority's establishment day and its outcomes reported to each House of the Oireachtas within twelve months. Moreover, the Authority is putting the practical arrangements in place for the provision, on foot of appropriate public consultations, of the required statutory report in relation to the education and training (including ongoing training) arrangements in the State for legal practitioners, including the manner in which such education and training is provided. This report, which has to be provided to me as Minister within two years of the Authority’s establishment day, will cover an array of matters set out within section 34 of the 2015 Act and be laid before the Houses.

Work has also commenced in preparation for the submission of the Authority's first three-year Strategic Plan under section 20 of the 2015 Act. The Authority will also be submitting its first full-year Annual Report having previously submitted a report for quarter three of 2016. Work is also ongoing between the Authority and my Department on a new Corporate Governance Assurance Agreement. Arrangements are also underway to fill, with the necessary approval of each House of the Oireachtas, a casual vacancy that has arisen on the Authority due to the appointment of an existing member to the Judiciary.

The Authority is nearing completion of the necessary analysis of the staffing needs and resources required to allow it to support the ongoing roll out of its functions to a structured and achievable timetable and intends to begin additional recruiting to key posts in the near future. There has been continued direct engagement between the Authority and my Department as well as between the Authority and other key stakeholders. This work has been augmented by the recent appointment by the Authority of its first full-time Chief Executive, Dr. Brian Doherty, along with its securing of enhanced office accommodation.

Against this background of complex and competing working demands, both I and my Department will continue to work closely with the Authority to enable it to come into substantive regulatory mode at the earliest opportunity and with appropriate staffing and project management. I am also anticipating an early opportunity to engage further myself with the Authority to discuss progress in relation to these matters. At the same time, it will be appreciated that the Authority is earnestly working to progress the identification and elaboration, in conjunction with my Department, of the more specific delivery dates concerned. I expect these will be made known as soon as they have been aligned, to the satisfaction of the Authority, with its anticipated working resources as an independent regulator.

Legal Services Regulation

Ceisteanna (147)

James Browne

Ceist:

147. Deputy James Browne asked the Minister for Justice and Equality if he will extend the time limit for complaints from three years to five years in view of the delays affecting the establishment of the Legal Services Regulatory Authority; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [4984/18]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Justice)

I would like to begin my Reply by clarifying that under the Legal Services Regulation Act 2015 there will be no time limit for complaints concerning allegations of professional misconduct by a legal practitioner. The three-year time limit to which the Deputy has referred will apply only to those complaints of a more minor nature that are made about inadequate services or excessive fees at what could be described as a consumer level. This is similar to the current regime that applies under the Solicitors' Acts albeit with a five-year limitation period in relation to the more minor level consumer complaints category.

In relation to complaints made under the 2015 Act about legal practitioners, a three-year time limit applies under section 58(7) to those consumer type complaints about "inadequate services" or "excessive fees" that may be made under section 51(1) of the Act once commenced. That is to say, complaints about behaviour around these particular issues at a more minor level that would not be considered to amount to “professional misconduct” as such. The application of the three-year time period under the 2015 Act is intended to encourage the early, informal and less costly resolution of these more minor consumer level complaints between the client and lawyer concerned.

However, a clear distinction must be drawn between such consumer level complaints and those of a more serious nature relating to allegations of professional misconduct by solicitors or barristers that can be made to the Legal Services Regulatory Authority under section 51(2) of the 2015 Act once commenced. This includes, where appropriate, by referral of the matters concerned to the Complaints Committee and to the Legal Practitioners' Disciplinary Tribunal that will be established under the Act. Section 50 of the Act sets out those acts or omissions by a legal practitioner that may be considered as constituting misconduct for that purpose including the charging of fees that would be considered to be grossly excessive. There will be no time limit on the making of such complaints to the Legal Services Regulatory Authority concerning allegations of professional misconduct by a legal practitioner.

All in all, I think the application of a three year limitation period to the making of consumer level complaints, and of no limitation period to complaints relating to allegations of professional misconduct, continue to represent a reasonable balance of the weight and gravity of the matters concerned and this is set to remain the policy position. Pending the commencement of those provisions of Part 6 of the Legal Services Regulation Act 2015 under which the new public complaints regime will come into operation, the current complaints framework under the Solicitors' Acts will continue to be available to the public. Any complaints made about solicitors through the Law Society under the existing framework of the Solicitors’ Acts will, of course, have to be completed under the existing law and procedures that apply for that purpose.

Departmental Operations

Ceisteanna (148)

Clare Daly

Ceist:

148. Deputy Clare Daly asked the Minister for Justice and Equality if legal privilege may attach to information regarding the names of persons sitting on a working group convened by a Department. [4990/18]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Justice)

The Deputy will appreciate that my Department has a very wide range of responsibilities, including matters relating to the law, courts, law enforcement and national security.  In the absence of further detail on the kind of working group envisaged, the subject matter of its discussions and the composition of its membership, it is difficult to give a definitive answer to this question.  In any case, to the extent that the question appears to be seeking legal advice or an interpretation of the law, it would not be appropriate for me to comment on it in response to a parliamentary question.

Censorship of Publications

Ceisteanna (149, 150, 151)

Niamh Smyth

Ceist:

149. Deputy Niamh Smyth asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the number of publications referred to the Censorship of Publications Board per annum since 2000; the number of publications prohibited per annum since 2000, in tabular form; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [5061/18]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Niamh Smyth

Ceist:

150. Deputy Niamh Smyth asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the number of members on the Censorship of Publications Board in each of the years 2011 to 2017 and to date in 2018; and the cost of the board per annum in those years. [5062/18]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Niamh Smyth

Ceist:

151. Deputy Niamh Smyth asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the number of members on the Censorship of Publications appeals board from 2010 to 2017 and to date in 2018; and the cost of the board per annum in those years. [5063/18]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Justice)

I propose to take Questions Nos. 149 to 151, inclusive, together.

In Ireland, as in many other countries, the right of freedom of expression is subject to certain restrictions that are justified in the public interest. These include restrictions permitting the censorship of publications under certain circumstances.

Censorship of publications is governed by legislation and administered by two statutory boards, as follows:

- the Censorship of Publications Board which was established under the Censorship of Publications Act 1929, and

- the Censorship of Publications Appeal Board which was established under the Censorship of Publications Act 1946.

Any person may make a complaint to the Censorship of Publications Board.

A prohibition order may be appealed to the Censorship of Publications Appeal Board by:

- the author, editor or publisher of the publication, or

- any five members of the Oireachtas acting jointly.

The Appeal Board may affirm, revoke or vary a prohibition. Complaints and appeals must be made in accordance with the Censorship of Publications Regulations 1980.

The number of publications referred to the Censorship of Publications Board per annum since 2000 and the number of such publications prohibited per annum is set out below.

 Year

Publications Referred

Publications Prohibited

Periodical Publications Referred

Periodical Publications Prohibited

 2000

 4

 0

11 

 0

 2001

 0

 0

 3

 0

 2002

 0

 0

 0

 0

 2003

 1

 0

 15

 9

 2004

 0

 0

 2

 0

 2005

 0

 0

 0

 0

 2006

 1

 0

 2

 0

 2007

 0

 0

 0

 0

 2008

 0

 0

 0

 0

 2009

 0

 0

 0

 0

 2010

 0

 0

 0

 0

 2011

 0

 0

 0

 0

 2012

 0

 0

 0

 0

 2013

 1

 0

 0

 0

 2014

 2

 0

 1

 0

 2015

 1

 0

 0

 0

 2016

 1

 1

 0

 0

 2017

 0

 0

 0

 0

 2018 (to end of January)

 0

 0

 0

 0

The Censorship of Publications Board comprises five Board members: a Chairperson and four Ordinary Members. The Board expired in November 2011, having served a term of five years.  A new Board was appointed with effect from March 2014. Members of this Board do not receive remuneration. For the years from 2011 to 2015 and from 2017 to date in 2018, no travel and subsistence allowance was paid to the Board members. In 2016, €604.35 in travel and subsistence expenses was paid to members of the Board.

The Censorship of Publications Appeal Board comprises five Board members: a Chairperson and four Ordinary Members. The Board expired in February 2012, having served a term of three years. No Board members have been appointed since that date. Members of this Board do not receive remuneration. For the years from 2010 to 2017 and to date in 2018, no travel and subsistence expenses have been paid to Board members.