Site Acquisitions

Ceisteanna (134)

Darragh O'Brien

Ceist:

134. Deputy Darragh O'Brien asked the Minister for Education and Skills the status of the provision of a new site for a school (details supplied) as announced in November 2015; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [1948/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Education)

As the Deputy is aware, a project to provide permanent accommodation for the school in question is included on my Department's Capital Programme.

With the assistance of officials in Fingal County Council under the Memorandum of Understanding the Deparment has agreement in principal on a preferred site option on which it is intended to deliver permanent accommodation for the school subject to no issues arising during the conveyance process.

Officials in my Department will endeavour to advance the acquisition as expeditiously as possible.

Schools Building Projects

Ceisteanna (135)

Darragh O'Brien

Ceist:

135. Deputy Darragh O'Brien asked the Minister for Education and Skills his plans to ensure that the works to provide a new school building for a school (details supplied) in addition to the associated refurbishment works commence as a matter of urgent priority; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [1949/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Education)

A building project for the school referred to by the Deputy is included in my Department’s 6 year Construction Programme.

A project brief has been finalised and the project will be delivered via the ADAPT programme. The ADAPT programme uses a professional external Project Manager to coordinate and drive the respective design teams on each project.

In this regard, a tender competition is in train to establish a Project Manager framework which is expected to be in place by early March. The formulation of tender documentation is underway and once the framework has been established a tender exercise will be carried out to appoint a Project Manager for this particular project.

All schools with projects on the ADAPT programme will be contacted shortly by my Department to provide an update on the status of their respective project. I wish to confirm to the Deputy that my Department is committed to providing a new school building for the school in question.

Schools Building Projects

Ceisteanna (136)

Michael McGrath

Ceist:

136. Deputy Michael McGrath asked the Minister for Education and Skills the reason no playing pitches will form part of the planned new education campus (details supplied) in County Cork; if funding will be provided for the purchase of land for the development of playing pitches as part of this campus development; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [1969/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Education)

The project to which the Deputy refers has been devolved for delivery to Cork Education and Training Board (CETB). I wish to advise the Deputy that the provision of pitches for training purposes is not part of the specification for primary schools, and at post-primary level the inclusion of same is subject to space availability and school accommodation requirements.

However, I understand that the available space on site with respect to the project referred to by the Deputy may allow for the inclusion of a pitch for training purposes. CETB is exploring this possibility in consultation with my Department and we may give consideration to providing a contribution towards the cost of delivering same subject to value for money and other relevant considerations.

Irish Naturalisation and Immigration Service Staff

Ceisteanna (137)

Micheál Martin

Ceist:

137. Deputy Micheál Martin asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the number of officials in his Department that are involved with co-ordinating Ireland's response to immigration cases from non-EU countries that arrive illegally. [1718/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Justice)

As part of the wider functions of the Irish Naturalisation and Immigration Service (INIS) of my Department, staff members from a variety of INIS areas may be required to deal with issues relating to migrants residing in the State without an immigration permission.

Irregular migration touches upon the work of several different areas of INIS, as this requires policy consideration as well as the management of individual cases. Such cases, as with all categories of INIS customers, are dealt with on a case-by-case basis depending on how the person has fallen out of permission, and whether they are seeking regularisation of their status.

A recent example of cooperation across INIS on irregular migration is the launch of a recent scheme that allows certain non-EEA nationals, who came to Ireland to study between January 2005 and December 2010 and have subsequently fallen out of immigration permission, to apply for permission to remain in the State. This scheme was devised by INIS Policy Unit, and it is being operationalised by Residence Division, with statistical and technological support from INIS Corporate Affairs Division.

In total, INIS staffing amounted to 821 full-time equivalent staff at the end of 2018. Due to the variety of INIS areas which may be involved in policy and individual cases relating to irregular migration, it is not possible to provide a breakdown of the number of staff within INIS who may be involved in such work.

Departmental Staff Data

Ceisteanna (138, 139)

Barry Cowen

Ceist:

138. Deputy Barry Cowen asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the number of employees in his Department; the number professionally qualified with organisations (details supplied); the number with other relevant professional qualifications; and the number with no professional qualifications, in tabular form. [1892/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Barry Cowen

Ceist:

139. Deputy Barry Cowen asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the number of employees in his Department authorised to engage in procurement; the number professionally qualified with organisations (details supplied); the number with other relevant professional qualifications; and the number with no professional qualifications, in tabular form. [1909/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Justice)

I propose to take Questions Nos. 138 and 139 together.

There are currently 2,463 members of staff in my Department and in the agencies funded from the Justice Vote. Information is not readily available on the number of staff across the sector whose roles may include the procurement of goods. A team of five staff work directly in the Department's Procurement Strategy Group, which provides a central advisory and support function on procurement matters to the Department itself. There is also ongoing interaction with the Office of Government Procurement in the management of procurement and with the Chief State Solicitors Office on legal questions where necessary.

A number of employees have undertaken courses at various levels in the area of Procurement, and these are supported, where appropriate, through the 'Learning and Development' Strategy of my Department and the associated 'Refund of Fees' Scheme. The Department does not currently maintain a central record of staff who are professionally qualified with the named organisations or who hold relevant professional qualifications.

Family Reunification

Ceisteanna (140)

Jackie Cahill

Ceist:

140. Deputy Jackie Cahill asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the rights given to a non-EEA citizen and their dependent children under 16 years of age in relation to visiting and or living here when an Irish citizen marries a non-EEA person in their country; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [1954/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Justice)

I am advised by the Irish Naturalisation and Immigration Service (INIS) of my Department that the non-EEA spouses and dependent children under the age of 18 of Irish nationals may visit or reside in the State with the Irish national, subject to certain criteria being met as per the "Policy Document on non-EEA Family Reunification". Persons from visa-required countries need to apply and be granted a visa in advance of travelling to the State in the normal way.

I am further informed that marriage or other familial relationship to an Irish National does not confer an automatic right of residence in the State. A non-EEA national who wishes to reside in the State on the basis of their family relationship to an Irish National must apply for permission to remain in the State.

Full details on the relevant criteria and the application process is available on the INIS website at http://www.inis.gov.ie/en/INIS/Pages/WP07000024. A successful spouse, or civil partner, of the Irish national may receive a renewable permission on Stamp 4 conditions. Other family members, such as the minor children of the Irish National may receive a permission on Stamp 3 conditions.

Further information on the overall family reunification policy titled "Policy Document on non-EEA Family Reunification" is also available on the INIS website: http://www.inis.gov.ie/en/INIS/Family%20Reunification%20Policy%20Document.pdf/Files/Family%20Reunification%20Policy%20Document.pdf

The Policy Document is updated from time to time to reflect evolving circumstances and is currently being examined by my officials with a view to its update in the coming months.

Naturalisation Certificates

Ceisteanna (141, 142, 143, 144)

Ruth Coppinger

Ceist:

141. Deputy Ruth Coppinger asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the number of certificates of naturalisation issued in 2018 to persons who were born here. [2009/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Ruth Coppinger

Ceist:

142. Deputy Ruth Coppinger asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the number of applications for naturalisation that have been applied for on behalf of persons under 18 years of age in 2017 and 2018; and the number of these applications that were by persons born here. [2010/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Ruth Coppinger

Ceist:

143. Deputy Ruth Coppinger asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the number of certificates of naturalisation that were granted to persons under 18 years of age in 2017 and 2018; and the number of these certificates that were issued to persons born here. [2011/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Ruth Coppinger

Ceist:

144. Deputy Ruth Coppinger asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the number of certificates of naturalisation issued in 2017 and 2018. [2012/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Justice)

I propose to take Questions Nos. 141 to 144, inclusive, together.

I am advised by the Irish Naturalisation and Immigration Service (INIS) of my Department that the number of certificates of naturalisation issued in 2017 and 2018 is 8,196 and 8,225 respectively. Of these a total of 1,395 and 1,261 were granted to persons under 18 years of age in 2017 and 2018 respectively.

The number of applications for naturalisation applied for on behalf of persons under 18 years of age for the years in question amount to 1,918 and 1,682 for the years in question. It should be noted that applications received in any particular year does not relate to those granted in that year due to the time taken to process applications.

The following table provides a further breakdown of the basis for naturalisation of those persons under the age of 18 who were granted certificates of naturalisation in 2017 and 2018.

Data in relation to those under 18 who were born in Ireland is not captured in a systematic manner as it is not directly applicable to the consideration of the grant of naturalisation. The criteria for grant of citizenship flows from the qualifying criteria including, in particular, the lawful residence of the parent or guardian of the person under 18, in accordance with the provisions of the citizenship acts.

To compile the information requested by the Deputy would involve a significant amount of staff time which would mean diverting those resources away from processing of cases which is the priority.

Tabulation of the grants relating to 2017 and 2018 – by classification type.

Classification Type

2017

2018

Naturalised Irish Parent

1,269

1,135

Irish Association

25

36

Born in the State post Jan 2005

53

76

Refugee, Parent Naturalised

48

12

Refugee, Irish Association

0

2

Total

1,395

1,261

Job Creation Targets

Ceisteanna (145)

Billy Kelleher

Ceist:

145. Deputy Billy Kelleher asked the Minister for Business, Enterprise and Innovation the annual targets for attaining 70,000 returned emigrants as per the Programme for A Partnership Government commitment; and the progress to date, in tabular form. [1999/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Business)

The Government’s goal is to support the creation of an additional 200,000 jobs by 2020, including 135,000 outside of Dublin, and to attract back at least 70,000 emigrants. The whole of Government effort to deliver on these objectives is supported by the annual Action Plan for Jobs, and from 2019, its successor, the Future Jobs programme.

The CSO estimates that between April 2017 and April 2018, 28,400 Irish emigrants returned to Ireland. As the economy continues to grow and approaches full employment, this trend is likely to continue.

Since the first Action Plan for Jobs was launched in early 2012, there are almost 385,700 more people at work bringing total employment in the State to 2,265,000 (as of Q3 2018). My Department and its agencies have a range of initiatives to connect with Irish emigrants (and others) to outline the careers and entrepreneurial opportunities in Ireland. These include:

- IDA Ireland actively promotes Ireland as a location for new investment and Enterprise Ireland has specific targets to attract entrepreneurs to Ireland with a focused marketing programme underway in international markets

- Since 2016, my Department has funded TechLife Ireland - a partnership with Enterprise Ireland, IDA Ireland and the Irish Technology industry - to promote and brand Ireland as a top destination to pursue a career in technology and attract top tech professionals to Ireland. Industry is playing an important role in supporting the initiative and driving its development.

- Science Foundation Ireland encourages leading researchers to move to Ireland raising Ireland’s profile as a location for research excellence and career advancement: for example, through SFI’s Future Research Leaders and Research Professorships Programmes.

Finally, I would emphasise that ensuring a continued focus on attracting foreign direct investment and maintaining and improving competitiveness is critical to attracting talent back to Ireland.

Departmental Staff Data

Ceisteanna (146, 147)

Barry Cowen

Ceist:

146. Deputy Barry Cowen asked the Minister for Business, Enterprise and Innovation the number of employees in her Department; the number professionally qualified with organisations (details supplied); the number with other relevant professional qualifications; and the number with no professional qualifications, in tabular form. [1881/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Barry Cowen

Ceist:

147. Deputy Barry Cowen asked the Minister for Business, Enterprise and Innovation the number of employees in her Department authorised to engage in procurement; the number professionally qualified with organisations (details supplied); the number with other relevant professional qualifications; and the number with no professional qualifications, in tabular form. [1898/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Business)

I propose to take Questions Nos. 146 and 147 together.

There are currently 909 employees (864.92 FTEs) in my Department. While some staff in my Department have undertaken procurement training, all staff are obliged to adhere to public procurement rules. Staff in my Department engaged in public procurement apply the guidelines published by the Office of Government Procurement (OGP), in procurement undertaken across the various business units and Offices in the Department. Furthermore, staff are guided by the expertise that resides in the OGP, and where appropriate use existing framework agreements put in place by the experts in the OGP, ensuring my staff can be confident that they are meeting their compliance obligations.

The OGP organises procurement in the public service under a unified structure to ensure that the procurement expertise and experience that exists is harnessed and applied consistently to public procurement activities.

While my Department does not currently maintain a comprehensive database of employee qualifications, including procurement qualifications, a skills register is being developed by OneLearning, the Learning and Development Centre for the Civil Service, as part of a new leaning and development platform technology, the Learning Management System. This will enable employees to populate and maintain their online profile with their professional qualifications and will allow Departments to identify the skills, knowledge and expertise that has been uploaded by them.

Notwithstanding the fact that the specific information regarding staff who hold, and don't hold professional qualifications, is not available, the Deputy may wish to note that there are a large number of professionally qualified personnel across many disciplines employed in the Department.

In this regard, there are a number of employees who are members of certain professional institutions for which the Department reimburse professional and affiliation fees, where it is deemed necessary to the performance of their official duties to maintain their membership of the professional body. At the end of 2018, the Department reimbursed fees for a total of 13 staff in respect of a number of professional bodies listed in the following.

Professional Institute

Chartered Accountants Ireland

Law Society of Ireland

Association of Chartered Certified Accountants

Certified Public Accountants

Irish Taxation Institute

Chartered Institute of Internal Auditors

Public Relations Institute of Ireland

There may be other employees that maintain their own membership with affiliated bodies not included in the table. Where professional and affiliation fees are not reimbursed by the Department, in the cases that membership is not a requirement for the performance of their official duties, data is not captured by the Department.

There are also a number of grades through which professional qualifications are a requirement. For example the following professionals currently hold positions within the Department: 11 Professional Accountants; 1 Head of Internal Audit; 9 Legal Services Personnel; 1 Statistician. There are also employees that have joined the Department through competitions that specified specific qualification requirements, but the information regarding the qualifications held is not captured by this Department due to the fact that recruitment is managed centrally by the Public Appointments Service. It should also be noted that many other staff may hold professional qualifications that are not recorded by the Department.

IDA Ireland Site Visits

Ceisteanna (148)

Billy Kelleher

Ceist:

148. Deputy Billy Kelleher asked the Minister for Business, Enterprise and Innovation the number of IDA client visits to each county in each of the years 2011 to 2018, in tabular form; and if she will make a statement on the matter. [1982/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Business)

IDA Ireland continues to highlight the benefits of expanding or locating in all counties to its client base. It is important to remember, however, that the final decision as to where to invest always rests with the company concerned. It is also the case that site visit activity does not necessarily reflect investment potential, as almost 70% of all new foreign direct investment comes from existing IDA Ireland client firm.

The following tables set out the number of IDA site visits to each county from 2011 to Q3 2018. Figures for Q4 2018 will become available later this month.

County

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

Dublin

150

196

180

205

242

Kildare

3

1

1

1

7

Meath

2

0

1

2

7

Wicklow

3

6

1

4

7

Laois

2

0

2

0

4

Longford

0

0

0

0

2

Offaly

1

3

1

1

8

Westmeath

15

7

9

12

28

Clare

15

14

5

9

12

Limerick

40

30

23

22

40

Tipperary

1

5

4

3

12

Cavan

0

3

2

1

0

Louth

26

12

4

10

20

Monaghan

1

0

1

0

2

Donegal

2

1

7

6

5

Leitrim

0

0

1

2

8

Sligo

3

6

10

7

15

Carlow

2

4

1

2

1

Kilkenny

0

3

3

4

10

Waterford

11

26

14

11

31

Wexford

0

3

2

1

4

Cork

27

38

31

30

48

Kerry

2

1

1

3

6

Galway

35

18

15

19

41

Mayo

0

1

3

4

3

Roscommon

0

0

4

0

2

Total

341

378

326

359

565

County

2016

2017

Q1 2018

Q2 2018

Q3 2018

Dublin

284

327

69

72

68

Kildare

8

10

4

0

1

Meath

8

3

1

3

1

Wicklow

5

2

0

1

0

Laois

6

4

4

2

1

Longford

6

7

0

0

2

Offaly

4

5

0

1

3

Westmeath

36

42

3

9

6

Clare

18

22

4

3

2

Limerick

49

42

8

7

10

Tipperary

8

8

1

1

2

Cavan

2

2

0

1

0

Louth

24

22

6

6

3

Monaghan

2

1

0

1

0

Donegal

7

2

0

3

3

Leitrim

8

5

2

3

0

Sligo

20

18

5

3

4

Carlow

9

8

1

2

0

Kilkenny

10

6

0

2

1

Waterford

17

11

5

9

5

Wexford

7

3

0

1

2

Cork

49

51

10

14

21

Kerry

3

9

0

5

3

Galway

42

62

10

20

12

Mayo

5

7

2

2

3

Roscommon

1

3

0

1

1

Total

638

682

135

172

154

IDA Ireland Jobs Data

Ceisteanna (149, 150, 151)

Billy Kelleher

Ceist:

149. Deputy Billy Kelleher asked the Minister for Business, Enterprise and Innovation the level of IDA supported jobs by county at 31 December 2018, in tabular form; and if she will make a statement on the matter. [1983/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Billy Kelleher

Ceist:

150. Deputy Billy Kelleher asked the Minister for Business, Enterprise and Innovation the number of IDA supported jobs; the number of jobs created and lost, respectively, in 2017 and 2018 by county, in tabular form; and if she will make a statement on the matter. [1984/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Billy Kelleher

Ceist:

151. Deputy Billy Kelleher asked the Minister for Business, Enterprise and Innovation the number in employment in IDA Ireland supported companies in each region (details supplied) in each of the years 2011 to 2018, in tabular form; and if she will make a statement on the matter. [1985/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Business)

I propose to take Questions Nos. 149 to 151, inclusive, together.

IDA Ireland's performance in 2018 resulted in the sixth consecutive year of strong growth under the Agency's current strategy. By the end of last year, total employment in the Agency's client companies stood at 229,057. Every region in Ireland has seen foreign direct investment-driven employment gains and there are now over 132,000 people employed across 681 firms in IDA client companies located outside of Dublin. 58% of all IDA client-supported jobs, in fact, are now located outside the capital. I am determined, together with the IDA, to see this trend continue and we will be doing everything possible in 2019 to encourage more firms to invest further in the regions.

The following tables provide a breakdown of jobs created by IDA supported companies in each county for 2018 and 2017 and the number of IDA jobs by county and region from 2011 to 2018.

Table A: IDA jobs created by county in 2018

New Jobs Created (Gross Gains)

Additional Jobs Created (Net Change)

Total Jobs

Carlow

275

275

1,150

Cavan

15

-59

1,096

Clare

494

-58

6,948

Cork

3,177

2,087

38,867

Donegal

212

172

3,564

Dublin

11,039

6,231

96,760

Galway

1,971

1,466

19,969

Kerry

122

54

2,241

Kildare

639

386

8,838

Kilkenny

36

-5

711

Laois

4

-12

122

Leitrim

26

25

909

Limerick

1,458

1,189

11,796

Longford

171

155

900

Louth

349

139

3,903

Mayo

426

344

4,828

Meath

122

67

1,632

Monaghan

13

12

162

Offaly

78

65

1,232

Roscommon

123

32

1,171

Sligo

184

13

2,251

Tipperary

296

55

3,720

Waterford

471

374

7,064

Westmeath

502

493

3,466

Wexford

171

152

3,139

Wicklow

411

388

2,618

Grand Total

22,785

14,040

229,057

Table B: IDA jobs created by county in 2017

New Jobs Created (Gross Gains)

Additional Jobs Created (Net Change)

Total Jobs

Carlow

75

73

875

Cavan

31

-48

1,155

Clare

653

260

7,006

Cork

2,697

1,445

36,780

Donegal

378

353

3,392

Dublin

12,340

7,148

90,529

Galway

2,253

1,462

18,503

Kerry

106

90

2,187

Kildare

499

-1288

8,452

Kilkenny

72

-46

716

Laois

5

3

134

Leitrim

84

81

884

Limerick

1,069

780

10,607

Longford

207

-38

745

Louth

346

161

3,764

Mayo

294

270

4,484

Meath

70

-96

1,565

Monaghan

14

13

150

Offaly

108

60

1,167

Roscommon

164

154

1,139

Sligo

66

-103

2,238

Tipperary

341

297

3,665

Waterford

522

437

6,690

Westmeath

240

224

2,973

Wexford

284

247

2,987

Wicklow

78

-4

2,230

Grand Total

22,996

11,935

215,017

Table C: IDA jobs by County 2011-2018

County

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

Cavan

1,172

1,128

1,135

1,136

1,165

1,203

1,155

1,096

Donegal

2,101

2,223

2,382

2,607

2,918

3,039

3,392

3,564

Leitrim

1,017

856

606

682

745

803

884

909

Louth

1,511

1,881

2,568

3,060

3,245

3,603

3,764

3,903

Monaghan

352

348

365

275

146

137

150

162

Sligo

2,444

2,405

2,271

2,264

2267

2,341

2,238

2,251

Dublin

59,114

63,181

67,923

71,362

76,090

83,381

90,529

96,760

Kildare

9,422

9,515

9,433

9,600

10,123

9,740

8,452

8,838

Meath

1,641

1,581

1,660

1,656

1,658

1,661

1,565

1,632

Wicklow

2,298

2,322

2,351

2,327

2,203

2,234

2,230

2,618

Laois

133

93

115

92

119

131

134

122

Longford

693

734

739

721

774

783

745

900

Offaly

986

1,041

1,058

1,059

1,080

1,107

1,167

1,232

Westmeath

2,260

2,403

2,366

2,561

2,689

2,749

2,973

3,466

Clare

6,403

6,173

6,090

6,252

6,373

6,746

7,006

6,948

Limerick

6,642

7,165

7,448

7,930

8,702

9,827

10,607

11,796

Tipperary North Riding

301

294

306

298

318

328

335

204

Carlow

514

645

735

749

768

802

875

1,150

Kilkenny

447

572

617

716

650

762

716

711

Tipperary South Riding

3,395

3,393

3,055

3,246

3,215

3,040

3,330

3,516

Waterford

5,259

5,112

5,183

5,248

5,574

6,253

6,690

7,064

Wexford

2,470

2,456

2,501

2,591

2,583

2,740

2,987

3,139

Cork

25,118

26,482

27,630

28,848

33,049

35,335

36,780

38,867

Kerry

1,512

1,625

1,659

1,895

1,948

2,097

2,187

2,241

Galway

13,101

13,756

14,342

14,746

15,463

17,041

18,503

19,969

Mayo

3,488

3,511

3,702

3,912

4,050

4,214

4,484

4,828

Roscommon

873

935

962

916

994

985

1,139

1,171

Total

154,667

161,830

169,202

176,749

188,909

203.082

215.017

229,057

Table D: IDA jobs by region 2011-2018

Region

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

West

17.462

18.202

19.006

19.574

20.507

22,240

24,126

25,968

South-West

26,630

28,107

29,289

30,743

34,997

37,432

38,967

41,108

South-East

12,085

12,178

12,091

12,550

12,790

13,597

14,598

15,580

Mid-West

13,346

13,632

13,844

14,480

15,393

16,901

17,948

18,948

Midlands

4,072

4,271

4,278

4,433

4,662

4,770

5,019

5,720

Mid-East

13,361

13,418

13,444

13,583

13,984

13,635

12,247

13,088

Dublin

59,114

63,181

67,923

71,362

76,090

83,381

90,529

96,760

North-East

3035

3,357

4,068

4,471

4,556

4,943

5,069

5,161

North-West

5562

5,484

5,259

5,553

5,930

6,183

6,514

6,724

Total

154,667

161,830

169,202

176,749

188,909

203,082

215,017

229,057

IDA Ireland Jobs Data

Ceisteanna (152)

Billy Kelleher

Ceist:

152. Deputy Billy Kelleher asked the Minister for Business, Enterprise and Innovation the number in employment in IDA Ireland supported companies in the mid-east and Dublin regions, respectively, in each of the years 2011 to 2018, in tabular form; and if she will make a statement on the matter. [1986/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Business)

IDA Ireland's results for 2018 underline how strongly Ireland continues to perform when it comes to attracting foreign direct investment (FDI). The Agency has seen its sixth consecutive year of growth with a record 229,057 people employed in FDI companies and 14,040 net new jobs added in 2018.

Dublin is now home to 763 overseas companies employing 96,760 people. There were 6,231 net new jobs added in Dublin in 2018, which is an increase of almost 7% over 2017. The Mid-East region also continues to perform well with employment in IDA client companies increasing by over 4% in Counties Kildare and Meath and 17% in County Wicklow from 2017 to 2018. The region remains attractive, in particular, as a location for second sites for IDA clients based in the Dublin area who are looking to expand their operations outside the capital.

The following table provides a breakdown of the number of employees in IDA Ireland-supported companies across the Mid-East and Dublin from 2011 to 2018.

County

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

Dublin

59,114

63,181

67,923

71,362

76,090

83,381

90,529

96,760

Kildare

9,422

9,515

9,433

9,600

10,123

9,740

8,452

8,838

Meath

1,641

1,581

1,660

1,656

1,658

1,661

1,565

1,632

Wicklow

2,298

2,322

2,351

2,327

2,203

2,234

2,230

2,618

Total

72,475

76,599

81,367

84,945

90,074

97,016

102,776

109,848

Enterprise Ireland Data

Ceisteanna (153, 154)

Billy Kelleher

Ceist:

153. Deputy Billy Kelleher asked the Minister for Business, Enterprise and Innovation the number of Enterprise Ireland supported jobs by county and, in the case of Dublin, by Dublin city, Dún Laoghaire-Rathdown, Fingal and south Dublin, in each of the years 2016 to 2018, in tabular form; and if she will make a statement on the matter. [1987/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Billy Kelleher

Ceist:

154. Deputy Billy Kelleher asked the Minister for Business, Enterprise and Innovation the number of Enterprise Ireland clients by county and, in the case of Dublin, by Dublin city, Dún Laoghaire-Rathdown, Fingal and south Dublin, in each of the years 2016 to 2018, in tabular form; and if she will make a statement on the matter. [1988/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Business)

I propose to take Questions Nos. 153 and 154 together.

On an annual basis Enterprise Ireland (EI) works with approximately 5,000 manufacturing and internationally traded services companies through the agency’s network of 10 offices in Ireland and 33 international offices.

In 2018 EI client companies reported strong employment performance with 215,207 people employed in companies supported by the agency and 18,846 new jobs created. The tables below present the figures for the following:

- The number of EI supported jobs by county and in the case of Dublin by Dublin city, Dún Laoghaire-Rathdown, Fingal and south Dublin in each of the years 2016 to 2018

- The number of EI clients by county and in the case of Dublin by Dublin city, Dún Laoghaire-Rathdown, Fingal and south Dublin in each of the years 2016 to 2018

Support to client companies is tailored to meet the individual needs of each client company in order to equip them to succeed in global markets. Every EI client company is assigned a developmental adviser who works with them to identify areas that can be optimised and improved. These areas are not just addressed through direct financial assistance, but through a wide range of soft supports, such as mentoring and management development programmes. These soft supports are not captured in the following tables.

Table 1: The total number of EI supported jobs by county in each of the years 2016 to 2018

County

2016

2017

2018

Carlow

2,973

3,034

3,221

Cavan

5,221

5,451

5,842

Clare

3,444

3,709

4,102

Cork

24,936

25,975

23,902

Donegal

3,581

3,552

3,818

Dublin

70,365

72,461

76,815

Galway

7,294

8,103

8,091

Kerry

4,677

4,866

4,727

Kildare

8,632

9,134

8,923

Kilkenny

4,167

4,276

4,549

Laois

1,385

1,473

1,527

Leitrim

922

559

607

Limerick

7,954

8,269

9,553

Longford

2,886

2,970

2,979

Louth

5,819

6,121

5,923

Mayo

3,856

4,118

4,692

Meath

7,007

7,302

7,135

Monaghan

5,168

5,366

5,626

Offaly

3,941

4,281

4,307

Roscommon

1,688

1,776

1,764

Sligo

1,546

1,733

1,916

Tipperary

5,352

5,907

5,921

Waterford

5,721

6,359

6,849

Westmeath

3,653

3,741

3,536

Wexford

4,816

4,670

4,674

Wicklow

4,104

4,132

4,208

Total

201,108

209,338

215,207

Table 2: The total number of EI supported jobs in each of the Dublin Boroughs in each of the years 2016 to 2018

County

2016

2017

2018

Dublin City

36,685

37,419

38,972

Dublin Fingal

8,855

9,979

10,482

Dublin South County

14,201

13,819

14,782

Dun Laoghaire - Rathdown

10,624

11,244

12,579

Dublin

70,365

72,461

76,815

Table 3: The total number of EI clients by county in each of the years 2016 to 2018

County

2016

2017

2018

Carlow

85

82

79

Cavan

79

78

76

Clare

143

131

125

Cork

580

568

541

Donegal

139

125

123

Dublin

2104

2,197

2,012

Galway

257

257

236

Kerry

114

127

113

Kildare

182

192

178

Kilkenny

114

116

109

Laois

54

55

51

Leitrim

29

25

22

Limerick

245

250

244

Longford

49

50

46

Louth

156

154

146

Mayo

114

115

110

Meath

169

170

155

Monaghan

106

104

100

Offaly

67

69

59

Roscommon

53

51

45

Sligo

69

69

65

Tipperary

117

123

111

Waterford

138

143

135

Westmeath

99

114

91

Wexford

123

122

115

Wicklow

166

161

148

Total

5551

5,648

5,235

Table 4: The number of Enterprise Ireland clients in each of the Dublin Boroughs in each of the years 2016 to 2018

Dublin Borough

2016

2017

2018

Dublin City

1,109

1,174

1,054

Dublin Fingal

281

289

266

Dublin South County

350

370

349

Dun Laoghaire - Rathdown

364

364

343

Dublin Total

2,104

2,197

2,012