Brexit Staff

Ceisteanna (51)

Catherine Murphy

Ceist:

51. Deputy Catherine Murphy asked the Taoiseach the number of regular grade civil servants his Department has hired in advance of a no-deal Brexit; the number of specialist grade civil servants hired in advance of same; and the budget made available in advance of Brexit for hiring of staff in advance of the UK withdrawal from the EU. [3328/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Taoiseach)

My Department works closely with the Department of Foreign Affairs & Trade, which has overall responsibility for Brexit.

Within my Department, staff across several divisions contribute to the work on Brexit. The International, European Union and Northern Ireland Division covers work on all international, EU and British-Irish and Northern Ireland affairs within the Department, including Brexit matters.

The Economic Division advises me on economic policy aimed at supporting sustainable economic growth, with a particular focus on jobs and competitiveness including the possible economic impacts of Brexit.

To augment the ongoing work of my Department’s International, EU and Northern Ireland Division on Brexit, my Department established a small unit to assist with Brexit preparedness and contingency planning. The unit assists a Secretaries General Group, which oversees ongoing work on national Brexit preparedness and contingency planning. The unit is also focusing on cross-Government co-ordination, planning and programme management.

Defence Forces Recruitment

Ceisteanna (52)

Seán Haughey

Ceist:

52. Deputy Seán Haughey asked the Taoiseach and Minister for Defence if funding will be provided for the recruitment of one additional full-time clinical psychologist for the Defence Forces; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [3116/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Defence)

There are currently two full-time clinical psychologists employed by the Defence Forces. This number was increased following the review of mental health services for the Defence Forces in 2017, which recommended the appointment of a civilian psychologist in addition to the existing Defence Forces psychologist. There are no plans currently in place to recruit a third clinical psychologist.

Defence Forces Equipment

Ceisteanna (53)

Seán Haughey

Ceist:

53. Deputy Seán Haughey asked the Taoiseach and Minister for Defence if funding will be available in 2019 to purchase additional 4x4 armoured utility vehicles and additional armoured logistic vehicles for the Defence Forces; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [3117/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Defence)

My priority as Minister with Responsibility for Defence is to ensure that the operational capability of the Army, Air Corps and Naval Service  is  maintained to the greatest extent possible so as to enable the Defence Forces to carry out their roles as assigned by Government both at home and overseas.

The acquisition of new equipment for the Defence Forces remains a clear focus for me. Future equipment priorities for the Army, Air Corps and Naval Service are considered in the context of the White Paper on Defence as part of the capability development and equipment priorities planning process.  The principal aim over the period of the White Paper will be to replace and upgrade, as required, existing capabilities in order to retain a flexible response for a wide range of operational requirements, including response to security risks and other emergencies, both at home and overseas.

In accordance with the National Development Plan, the capital allocation for Defence has been increased to €106 million for 2019, an increase of €29 million. The National Development Plan provides for a total of €541 million for Defence over the period 2018-2022. This level of capital funding will allow the Defence Organisation to undertake a programme of sustained equipment replacement and infrastructural development across the Army, Air Corps and Naval Service as identified and prioritised in the Defence White Paper and builds on the significant investment programme over recent years.  

In relation to the Army, there is ongoing investment in force protection, transport, communications and information technology, weapons and ammunition.  Twenty four (24) 4 x 4 Armoured Utility Vehicles were acquired in late 2017 and in 2018 the Defence Forces took delivery of ten (10) new armoured logistic vehicles. A significant investment is being made in the Army’s fleet of MOWAG Armoured Personnel Carriers. A multi-year mid-life upgrade programme is underway at a cost of €55m plus VAT which will extend the utility of the fleet and provide greater levels of protection, mobility and firepower. The first twenty (20) upgraded vehicles were recently delivered.

The Defence Forces fleet of armoured and non-armoured vehicles is subject to regular review to ensure that it meets operational requirements both at home and overseas. In this regard a requirement for additional 4x4 armoured utility vehicles has been identified and subject to consideration of a business case and assessment of associated cost, funding will be made available. At this time there are no plans for the purchase of additional armoured logistic vehicles for the Defence Forces.

I am satisfied that the Defence Forces have the necessary resources available to them, including a modern and effective range of equipment which is line with best international standards in order to fulfil all roles assigned to them by Government.

Departmental Funding

Ceisteanna (54)

Catherine Connolly

Ceist:

54. Deputy Catherine Connolly asked the Taoiseach and Minister for Defence the amount of annual funding provided to an organisation (details supplied); the reporting requirements in respect of this funding; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [3226/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Defence)

My Department made an annual grant payment of €900,000 to the organisation referred to in 2018. This was an increase from €869,000 per year in the years from 2012 to 2017 and was agreed as part of a phased increase following receipt and examination of a detailed business case submitted by the organisation. The annual grant had been reduced from €951,000 to €869,000 in 2012 due to the prevailing difficult economic climate at that time. 

The conditions for the provision of an annual grant are set out in a Memorandum of Understanding between my Department and the organisation.  The annual grant is paid in quarterly instalments and each year my Department receives a report from the organisation which sets out full details of how the previous year’s grant was utilised and details of how it is planned to be used in the current year. My officials also request and receive the annual consolidated financial statements of the organisation. The annual consolidated financial statements are published on the organisation's website and are subject to audit by an independent external firm of auditors whose report is also published. 

In addition, the organisation is required to comply with the Department of Public Expenditure Circular 13/2014: "Management of and Accountability for Grants from Exchequer Funds".

Brexit Staff

Ceisteanna (55)

Catherine Murphy

Ceist:

55. Deputy Catherine Murphy asked the Taoiseach and Minister for Defence the number of regular grade civil servants his Department has hired in advance of a no-deal Brexit; the number of specialist grade civil servants hired in advance of same; the budget made available in advance of Brexit for hiring of staff in advance of the UK withdrawal from the EU; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [3318/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Defence)

As part of a whole of Government approach, my Department continues to engage in forward planning with the other Departments involved in addressing all issues relevant to the UK decision to exit from the European Union. 

I am satisfied that the necessary arrangements are in place in my Department to address the potential challenges arising from Brexit, with responsibility for Brexit-related matters being assigned at Assistant Secretary General level.  In this regard, I am also satisfied that the Department currently has the appropriate staffing complement in terms of both numbers and expertise to deal with issues that may arise in the context of Brexit. In this context it has not proved necessary to hire additional staff specifically to deal with Brexit at this point.

The staffing needs of my Department are kept under constant review in the context of the prudent management of its pay allocation. In this regard I can assure the Deputy that should a need be identified for additional staff in the context of Brexit, the necessary funding will be available. 

Consular Services

Ceisteanna (56)

Seán Haughey

Ceist:

56. Deputy Seán Haughey asked the Tánaiste and Minister for Foreign Affairs and Trade his plans to refurbish the embassy in Madrid; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [3119/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Foreign)

There are no plans currently to refurbish the Embassy of Ireland to Spain in Madrid. 

As part of the duty of care to staff, their families and visitors the Department works to ensure that all security and health and safety standards, including universal access, are met for buildings at home and overseas.

 

Passport Applications

Ceisteanna (57)

Peter Burke

Ceist:

57. Deputy Peter Burke asked the Tánaiste and Minister for Foreign Affairs and Trade the status of a passport application by a person (details supplied); and if he will make a statement on the matter. [3195/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Foreign)

All passport applications are subject to the provisions of the Passports Act, 2008 as amended (“the Act”).  Before a passport can issue, the Passport Service must be satisfied as to the identity of the applicant and that he or she is an Irish citizen.

An application was received in respect of the person to whom you refer, on 8 August 2018.  Following communication and further information from the applicant, the Passport Service is satisfied that the application is in compliance with the Act.  The application has been approved and a passport will issue shortly.

Irish Aid

Ceisteanna (58)

Catherine Connolly

Ceist:

58. Deputy Catherine Connolly asked the Tánaiste and Minister for Foreign Affairs and Trade his views on the decision of an organisation (details supplied) to close its international department; the process for Irish Aid to work with the organisation in the future; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [3225/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Foreign)

The decision of the organisation in question to close its international department is an internal matter for that organisation.  

Irish Aid works with a broad range of partners in order to deliver our policy goals. Should the organisation in question revisit its decision regarding international activities, it would be open for that organisation, as with any other Irish NGO active in the area, to apply for Irish Aid funding.  Potential partners are assessed based on the degree to which their areas of focus and expertise align with Irish Aid's stated goals, their demonstrated ability to deliver effective change, and their compliance with a range of criteria, including financial standards and organisational procedures.   

 

International Election Monitoring

Ceisteanna (59, 60, 61)

Clare Daly

Ceist:

59. Deputy Clare Daly asked the Tánaiste and Minister for Foreign Affairs and Trade if his attention has been drawn to public dissatisfaction with the recent election observation competition; and the reason the qualifications and experience of candidates were not awarded points in the competition. [3230/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Clare Daly

Ceist:

60. Deputy Clare Daly asked the Tánaiste and Minister for Foreign Affairs and Trade the arrangements made for candidates with a disability in the recent election observation competition; and the arrangements made for them as part of the appeal process. [3231/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Clare Daly

Ceist:

61. Deputy Clare Daly asked the Tánaiste and Minister for Foreign Affairs and Trade the arrangements in place to ensure that the election observation competition is independent; the way in which marks will be reviewed on appeal; and the independent chairpersons for the competition. [3232/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Foreign)

I propose to take Questions Nos. 59 to 61, inclusive, together.

International election observation missions play an important role in the promotion of democracy and human rights. The Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade aims to ensure that, when requested, Ireland is represented at an appropriate level on international election observation missions. Irish observers participate primarily in missions organised by the European Union or the Organisation for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE).

A new roster of volunteer international election observers was put in place in January 2019.

The Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade received 395 applications, allowing a roster of 201 members to be mustered, similar to the number of volunteers mustered under the previous roster. The level of interest meant that there was intense competition for the available places. To ensure a fair process, a booklet was made available detailing the elements which applicants were expected to demonstrate in completing their written applications. Assessment at this stage was subject to independent calibration and quality assurance from an external agency.

Eight adjudication panels were established, chaired by retired officials of the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade, of Ambassadorial rank and who, during their career, had demonstrated extensive experience of human rights, democratisation and the rule of law overseas.

While I am confident that the high level of interest will help ensure the quality of Irish election observers remains high, with nearly twice as many applicants as available places, regrettably not all of those willing to volunteer could be selected.

In the interest of fairness, an appeal mechanism was available. Less than one fifth of the unsuccessful candidates sought a formal review by way of appeal. On the basis of the grounds submitted by each candidate, about half of the review requests were accepted and referred to an Appeals Panel. That Appeals Panel has yet to finish its deliberations.

As was made clear to all potential volunteers in the Volunteer Information Booklet which set out the requirements expected, all candidates were required to provide at least one relevant example under each of five competencies, as part of a competency based assessment. Provided that a candidate with prior international election observation experience, or, indeed, any other relevant experience, demonstrated through the examples provided in their application form that they possessed the competencies under assessment, such experience was fully considered in the marking process.

Although the Volunteer Information Booklet did not specify that particular qualifications were essential or desirable, a small proportion of marks were awarded for the specific skills and experiences which were listed as desirable in the Volunteer Information Booklet.

In the event of any candidate requesting reasonable accommodation for a disability at the time of application, such a request would have been given full and thorough consideration. No candidate requested any particular arrangement at the time of applying, and no candidate contacted the Department at any stage of the process prior to the appeals stage to ask whether particular arrangements could be made. The Appeals Panel cannot consider new information which was not provided at the time of application, to do so would not be fair to all candidates in the process.

Brexit Staff

Ceisteanna (62)

Catherine Murphy

Ceist:

62. Deputy Catherine Murphy asked the Tánaiste and Minister for Foreign Affairs and Trade the number of regular grade civil servants his Department has hired in advance of a no-deal Brexit; the number of specialist grade civil servants hired in advance of same; the budget made available in advance of Brexit for hiring of staff in advance of the UK withdrawal from the EU; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [3322/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Foreign)

Managing the response to Brexit has impacted on the work of many units in the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade and its missions overseas and staffing levels have been augmented in response.

Global Ireland 2025 will support efforts to grow and diversify export markets, inward investment and tourism, as Brexit becomes a reality. It will ensure that Ireland is better positioned to build the alliances necessary to advance its interests and defend its positions in a post-Brexit EU, while also helping to secure our deep and positive relationship with the UK and its constituent parts into the future.

In response my Department is in the process of significant expansion.

An additional €18 million has been allocated for Brexit-related expenditure in DFAT in 2019 which will include significant investment in the Global Ireland initiative. The allocation will allow further expansion and deepening of our whole of Government Brexit preparedness planning. We will continue to strengthen our teams in EU member states, assigning additional personnel in key posts abroad. Funding has been earmarked for the Passport Service, and to support essential reconciliation work being carried out by civil society in Northern Ireland and across the island of Ireland, and North-South cooperation.

One area of my Department that has been particularly impacted by the prospect of Brexit is the Passport Service, which closely monitors the volume of applications on an ongoing basis to ensure that resources are available to meet the demand.

My Department has strengthened the capacity of the Passport Service by recruiting additional permanent staff over the past twelve months to respond to the general increase in passport applications.

The normal seasonal intake of Temporary Clerical Officers has already commenced, and in the coming months, it is hoped that over 150 Temporary Clerical Officers will be assigned to the processing of applications. A further key response by the Passport Service to the growth of applications is the establishment of a communications hub where fifty staff have already been allocated to ensure an effective service is delivered in response to increasing volumes of customer queries.

The Department will allocate additional staff resources as deemed necessary to further augment our Brexit-related capacity in Ireland and across the diplomatic mission network.

Undocumented Irish in the USA

Ceisteanna (63, 64)

Brendan Smith

Ceist:

63. Deputy Brendan Smith asked the Tánaiste and Minister for Foreign Affairs and Trade his plans to pursue with members of the administration, Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America the need to progress immigration reform with particular reference to the difficulties facing the undocumented Irish; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [3423/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Brendan Smith

Ceist:

64. Deputy Brendan Smith asked the Tánaiste and Minister for Foreign Affairs and Trade his plans to progress further the proposal for Irish persons to access the United States of America E-3 Visa Programme; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [3424/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Foreign)

I propose to take Questions Nos. 63 and 64 together.

I and my Government colleagues regret that it did not prove possible to secure passage of the Irish E3 Visa Bill in December, during the last term of the outgoing US Congress.

While this was disappointing news for all who care about the Ireland-US relationship, it is important to acknowledge the strong support received from many quarters on Ireland's position on securing a legal pathway for Irish citizens wishing to live and work in the US, an issue of very real importance for the continued development of the Ireland-US relationship.

I believe that the backing received from the US Administration; former Speaker Paul Ryan; the Congressional Friends of Ireland, and many others, Republican and Democrat, on this Bill, is testament to the depth and strength of our transatlantic relationship.

The Taoiseach and I have prioritised the immigration issue in the US since taking office. We will therefore continue our efforts in this regard until we secure progress – both in terms of future legal immigration opportunities for Irish citizens; and in securing a pathway for those Irish who are undocumented in order to regularise their status.

Special Envoy to the US Congress on the Undocumented, John Deasy T.D., has worked closely on these issues with Ireland's Ambassador to the US, Dan Mulhall, and his team at the Embassy in Washington DC. I know that their commitment to, and engagement on, these issues will continue undiminished.

I look forward to visiting the US in February, for a series of engagements with the US Administration and Congressional leaders on the full range of issues of mutual interest. I will raise immigration issues in these meetings, as I have done in all my interactions with the US Administration and US political leaders since taking office.

Likewise, over the St Patrick's Day period, the Taoiseach will have a range of engagements at the highest levels of the US Administration and Congress. He too will raise immigration issues, building on the work of my Department and in particular the continued engagement on this matter from our Embassy in Washington, D.C., together with Special Envoy Deasy.

I would also note that our Embassy and the Consulates in America will continue to support the Irish Immigration Centres in their work. Each Centre receives significant Government funding through the Emigrant Support Programme each year for its work, including its support for vulnerable Irish and the undocumented. In 2018, over $3,700,000 was allocated to 76 organisations across the US, including many organisations that provide frontline welfare support and services to undocumented Irish.

Tax Clearance Certificates

Ceisteanna (65)

Tom Neville

Ceist:

65. Deputy Tom Neville asked the Minister for Finance if a tax clearance certificate will be issued to a person (details supplied). [3150/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Finance)

I am advised by Revenue a tax clearance certificate has issued to the person concerned.

Insurance Costs

Ceisteanna (66)

Pearse Doherty

Ceist:

66. Deputy Pearse Doherty asked the Minister for Finance the steps in the cost of insurance working group report relevant to agricultural marts; the progress made to date in relation to same; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [3161/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Finance)

As Minister for Finance, I am responsible for the development of the legal framework governing financial regulation.  Neither I nor the Central Bank of Ireland can interfere in the provision or pricing of insurance products, as these matters are of a commercial nature, and are determined by insurance companies based on an assessment of the risks they are willing to accept.  This position is reinforced by the EU framework for insurance which expressly prohibits Member States from adopting rules which require insurance companies to obtain prior approval of the pricing or terms and conditions of insurance products.  Consequently, although I am aware of concerns in relation to the financial strain which the cost of insurance may place on the operation of agricultural marts, I am not in a position to direct insurance companies as to the pricing level or terms or conditions they should apply to a particular sector. 

Nevertheless, it is possible for the State to play a role in helping to stabilise the market and deal with factors contributing to the availability and cost of insurance.  What was recognised with the establishment of the Cost of Insurance Working Group (CIWG) was that the environment within which insurers conduct their business can be better shaped, in order to make the Irish insurance market a more competitive one and also make it more attractive for new entrants.  Building upon the work undertaken in the completion of the Report on the Cost of Motor Insurance, the second phase of the CIWG, as you are aware, culminated in the publication of the Report on the Cost of Employer and Public Liability Insurance in January 2018.

This report makes 15 recommendations with 29 associated actions to be carried out, set out in an Action Plan with agreed timelines for implementation.  The three main themes in these recommendations are increasing transparency, reviewing the level of damages in personal injury cases and improving the personal injuries litigation framework.  

Although the agricultural mart sector did not form part of the formal consultation process for the report, previous relevant representations from yourself and the chairperson of a marts association were taken into consideration by the CIWG.  In addition other relevant stakeholders consulted with by, or providing submissions to, the CIWG, were representatives from the Irish Farmers’ Association and Meat Industry Ireland, as well as the main provider of insurance for the mart sector in Ireland. 

Also, I am aware that my colleague, the Minister of State for Financial Services and Insurance and Chair of the CIWG, Mr. Michael D’Arcy T.D., met with representatives from the Marts Committee of the Irish Co-operative Organisation Society (ICOS) in March 2018, subsequent to the Report’s release.  I understand that the ICOS agreed at this meeting that health and safety was one of the key considerations for insurers when assessing risk and that there was a level of responsibility by mart owners in this regard.  I have also been advised that mart owners generally have been reassessing practices on foot of previous experiences of claims submitted against marts and, accordingly, implementing relevant improvements in management practices and standards of facilities in order to seek to avoid such situations arising again.

Finally, the most recent quarterly update on implementation was published on 12 November 2018 and shows that of the 19 actions from the Report on the Employer and Liability Insurance with deadlines up to and including Q3 2018, 18 have been completed.  I would like to assure the Deputy that the CIWG Group will continue to focus on implementing the recommendations of the Report on the Cost of Employer and Public Liability Insurance in parallel with implementing those from the Motor Report.  I am hopeful that the cumulative effects of the completion of the two Reports’ recommendations will include increased stability in the pricing of insurance for businesses and, of particular relevance to the mart sector, a broader and more competitive insurance market.

Banking Sector

Ceisteanna (67)

Pearse Doherty

Ceist:

67. Deputy Pearse Doherty asked the Minister for Finance the number of applications made for a transfer of a banking business under section 33 of the Central Bank Act 197; the number of transfers carried out; if a list these transfers will be provided; the transfer applications rejected by him or the Central Bank; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [3163/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Finance)

There have been 49 transfers of banking business carried out under section 33 of the Central Bank Act 1971 (as amended) since the legislation was introduced. A list of the Statutory Instruments (S.I.s) giving Ministerial approval for these transfers is detailed below. In my time as Minister for Finance, I have received two requests seeking my approval to transfer a banking business. Both were made in the context of the Brexit preparations of the banks involved. Upon review of the proposals, and consultation with the Governor of the Central Bank on the relevant regulatory, supervisory and prudential considerations, I gave my approval to both bank transfers.

A key consideration when reviewing proposals to transfer banking business is that in promoting the industry it is important that there is fair entry to and exit from the financial services sector in Ireland, and the Government has no desire to cause undue difficulty to firms wishing to enter or withdraw from the market. Moreover, we recognise that mergers and acquisitions play an important role in the growth of firms, and transfers of banking business often take place in such a context. Also, as banks with a global footprint enter the Irish market using branch or subsidiary structures, when there is a restructuring at group level, it may be necessary for the bank to transfer its business internally from one part of the group to another. This is particularly the case in light of Brexit, where the Irish authorised bank may be a branch of the group's UK bank and transfers its Irish business to become a branch of another European bank within the group structure.

It is not in the spirit of the legislation to prohibit any transfer of banking business, unless there were serious concerns about the regulatory or prudential impact of a proposed transfer, or it would be likely to have a significant negative impact on the Irish economy or financial stability.  

Statutory Instruments made under Section 33 of the Central Bank Act 1971 (as amended)

1. Central Bank Act 1971 (Approval of Scheme of Transfer between HSBC Bank plc and HSBC France) Order 2018 [S.I. No. 508 of 2018]

2. Central Bank Act 1971 (Approval of Scheme of Transfer between J.P. Morgan Bank (Ireland) plc and J.P. Morgan Bank Luxembourg S.A., Dublin Branch) Order 2018 [S.I. No. 386 of 2018]

3. Central Bank Act 1971 (Approval of Scheme of Transfer between LGT Bank (Ireland) Limited and LGT Bank Ltd.) Order 2016 [S.I. No. 465 of 2016]

4. Central Bank Act, 1971 (Approval of Scheme of Transfer between ICS Building Society and The Governor and Company of the Bank of Ireland) Order, 2014 [S.I. No. 257 of 2014]

5. Central Bank Act 1971 (Approval of Scheme of The Royal Bank of Scotland N.V. and The Royal Bank of Scotland plc) Order 2012 [S.I. No. 137 of 2012]

6. Central Bank Act, 1971 (Approval of Scheme of Transfer between Northern Rock plc and Irish Life & Permanent plc (trading as permanent tsb)) Order, 2011 [S.I. No. 547 of 2011]

7. Central Bank Act, 1971 (Approval of Scheme of First Active plc and Ulster Bank Ireland Limited) Order, 2009 [S.I. No. 481 of 2009]

8. Central Bank Act 1971 (Approval of Scheme of KBC Mortgage Bank and KBC Bank Ireland plc) Order, 2009 [S.I. No. 125 of 2009]

9. Central Bank Act, 1971 (Approval of Scheme of Hypo Public Finance Bank and DEPFA BANK plc) Order, 2008 [S.I. No. 8 of 2008]

10. Central Bank Act, 1971 (Approval of Scheme of National Irish Bank Limited and Danske Bank A/S) Order, 2007 [S.I. No. 29 of 2007]

11. Central Bank Act 1971 (Approval of Scheme of AIB Finance Limited and Allied Irish Banks, p.l.c.) Order 2006 [S.I. No. 557 of 2006]

12. Central Bank Act, 1971 (Approval of Scheme of AIB Capital Markets p.l.c. and Allied Irish Banks, p.l.c.) Order, 2005 [S. I. No. 612 of 2005]

13. Central Bank Act, 1971 (Approval of Scheme of Transfer between Barclays Bank plc and Barclays Bank Ireland plc) Order, 2005 [S.I. No. 227 of 2005]

14. Central Bank Act, 1971 (Approval of Scheme of Transfer between Citibank International plc and Citibank Ireland Financial Services plc) Order, 2004 [S.I. No. 470 of 2004]

15. Central Bank Act, 1971 (Approval of Scheme of the Investment Bank of Ireland Limited and the Governor and Company of the Bank of Ireland) Order, 2004 [S.I. No. 38 of 2004]

16. Central Bank Act, 1971 (Approval of Scheme of Rheinhyp Bank Europe Plc and Europaische Hypothekenbank S.A.) (No. 2) Order, 2003 [S.I. No. 343 of 2003]

17. Central Bank Act, 1971 (Approval of Scheme of ABN AMRO Bank N.V. and Allied Irish Banks, p.l.c.) Order, 2003 [S.I. No. 64 of 2003]

18. Central Bank Act, 1971 (Approval of Scheme of Depfa Bank-Europe Plc and Depfa Bank Plc) Order, 2002 [S.I. No. 470 of 2002]

19. Central Bank Act, 1971 (Approval of Scheme of Bank of Scotland (Ireland) Limited and Icc Bank Plc) Order, 2002 [S.I. No. 27 of 2002]

20. Central Bank Act, 1971 (Approval of Scheme of Icc Investment Bank Limited and Icc Bank Plc) Order, 2002 [S.I. No. 26 of 2002]

21. Central Bank Act, 1971 (Approval of Scheme of Ulster Bank Limited and Ulster Bank Markets Limited) Order, 2001 [S.I. No. 365 of 2001]

22. Central Bank Act, 1971 (Approval of Scheme of Transfer between Citibank, N.A. and Citibank International PLC, Ireland Branch) Order, 2001 [S.I. No. 325 of 2001]

23. Central Bank Act, 1971 (Approval of Scheme of Lombard & Ulster Banking Limited and Ulster Bank Markets Limited) Order, 2001 [S.I. No. 187 of 2001]

24. Central Bank Act, 1971 (Approval of Scheme of Ansbacher Bankers Limited and Anglo Irish Bank Corporation public limited company) Order, 2000 [S.I. No. 298 of 2000]

25. Central Bank Act, 1971 (Approval of Scheme of Bank of Ireland Finance Limited and The Governor and Company of the Bank of Ireland) Order, 2000 [S.I. No. 204 of 2000]

26. Central Bank Act, 1971 (Approval of Scheme of Anglo Irish Corporate Bank Limited and Anglo Irish Bank Corporation plc) Order, 2000 [S.I. No. 53 of 2000]

27. Central Bank Act, 1971 (Approval of Scheme of EUROHYPO European Mortgage Bank plc and Europäische Hypothekenbank S.A.) Order, 2000 [S.I. No. 52 of 2000]

28. Central Bank Act, 1971 (Approval of Scheme of GE Capital Woodchester Bank Limited and Investec Bank (UK) Limited) Order, 2000 [S.I. No. 28 of 2000]

29. Central Bank Act, 1971 (Approval of Scheme of Hypo-Bank Ireland and Vereinsbank Ireland) Order, 1998 [S.I. No. 361 of 1998]

30. Central Bank Act, 1971 (Approval of Scheme of Irish Bank of Commerce Limited and Anglo Irish Bank Corporation Public Limited Company) Order, 1997 [S.I. No. 282 of 1997]

31. Central Bank Act, 1971 (Approval of Scheme of National Irish Investment Bank Limited and National Irish Vank Limited) Order, 1996 [S.I. No. 320 of 1996]

23. Central Bank Act, 1971 (Approval of Scheme of the Bank of Nova Scotia and Scotiabank (Ireland) Limited) Order, 1996 [S.I. No. 258 of 1996]

33. Central Bank Act, 1971 (Approval of Scheme of Westdeutsche Landesbank (Ireland) Limited and Westdeutsche Landesbank (Ireland) p.l.c.) Order, 1996 [S.I. No. 119 of 1996]

34. Central Bank Act, 1971 (Approval of Scheme of Irish Business Bank, The Dublin Branch of Tsb Bank Plc, and Anglo Irish Bank Corporation Plc) Order, 1995 [S.I. No. 121 of 1995]

35. Central Bank Act, 1971 (Approval of Scheme of Hill Samuel Bank Limited and TSB Bank plc) Order, 1994 [S.I. No. 263 of 1994]

36. Central Bank Act, 1971 (Approval of Scheme of ABN AMRO Bank (Ireland) Limited and ABN AMRO Bank N.V.) Order, 1993 [S.I. No. 185 of 1993]

37. Central Bank Act, 1971 (Approval of Scheme of Woodchester Credit Lyonnais Bank Limited and Woodchester Investment Bank Limited) Order, 1992 [S.I. No. 383 of 1992]

38. Central Bank Act, 1971 (Approval of Scheme of Woodchester Credit Lyonnais Bank Limited and Woodchester First Southern Bank Limited) Order, 1992 [S.I. No. 303 of 1992]

39. Central Bank Act, 1971 (Approval of Scheme of Woodchester Credit Lyonnaise Bank Limited and First Southern Bank Limited) Order, 1992 [S.I. No. 302 of 1992]

40. Central Bank Act, 1971 (Approval of Scheme of Hill Samuel Bank (Ireland) Limited and Hill Samuel Bank Limited) Order, 1992 [S.I. No. 242 of 1992]

41. Central Bank Act, 1971 (Approval of Scheme of Banque Nationale de Paris (Ireland) Limited and Banque Nationale de Paris S.A.) Order, 1992 [S.I. No. 241 of 1992]

42. Central Bank Act, 1971 (Approval of Scheme of National Irish Investment Bank Limited and National Irish Bank Limited), Order, 1992 [S.I. No. 210 of 1992]

43. Central Bank Act, 1971 (Approval of Scheme of ABN AMRO Bank (Ireland) Limited and ABN AMRO Bank N.V.) Order, 1991 [S.I. No. 283 of 1991]

44. Central Bank Act (Approval of Scheme of Lombard & Ulster Banking (I) Limited and Lombard & Ulster Banking Ireland Limited) Order, 1972 [S.I. No. 25 of 1972]

45. Central Bank Act, (Approval of Scheme of the Royal Bank of Ireland Limited and Allied Irish Banks Limited) Order, 1972 [S.I. No. 24 of 1972]

46. Central Bank Act, (Approval of Scheme of Provincial Bank of Ireland Limited and Allied Irish Banks Limited) Order, 1972 [S.I. No. 23 of 1972]

47. Central Bank Act, (Approval of Scheme of the Munster and Leinster Bank Limited and Allied Irish Banks Limited) Order, 1972 [S.I. No. 22 of 1972]

48. Central Bank Act (Approval of Scheme of The Hibernian Bank Limited and The Governor and Company of the Bank of Ireland) Order, 1972 [S.I. No. 21 of 1972]

49. Central Bank Act, (Approval of Scheme of the National Bank of Ireland Limited and The Governor and Company of the Bank of Ireland) Order, 1972 [S.I. No. 20 of 1972]

IBRC Liquidation

Ceisteanna (68, 69)

Marc MacSharry

Ceist:

68. Deputy Marc MacSharry asked the Minister for Finance the name of the creditors that received payments from the joint special liquidators of IBRC since the liquidation commenced on 7 February 2013; the amounts claimed by each creditor; the amounts paid to each creditor; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [3233/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Marc MacSharry

Ceist:

69. Deputy Marc MacSharry asked the Minister for Finance the name of the creditors that claimed payments from the joint special liquidators of IBRC since the liquidation commenced on 7 February 2013 and whose claims have been validated but not paid in full or not at all; the amounts outstanding in each case; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [3234/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Finance)

I propose to take Questions Nos. 68 and 69 together.

I am advised by the Special Liquidators of IBRC that for reasons of commercial sensitivity and confidentiality, they do not believe it would be appropriate to provide the requested details regarding individual creditors and their claims on the liquidation of IBRC.

As at the end of December 2017 more than 2,400 claims had been adjudicated on with a remaining c.700 claims undergoing review. Pages 14 and 15 of the most recent progress update report (https://www.finance.gov.ie/updates/ibrc-progress-update-report-year-ended-31-december-2017/) provides a detailed overview of the creditor adjudication process.

IBRC Liquidation

Ceisteanna (70, 71, 73)

Marc MacSharry

Ceist:

70. Deputy Marc MacSharry asked the Minister for Finance the name of the professional service providers that received payments from the joint special liquidators of IBRC since the liquidation on 7 February 2013; the amounts paid in each case; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [3235/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Marc MacSharry

Ceist:

71. Deputy Marc MacSharry asked the Minister for Finance the amount paid to the joint special liquidators of IBRC since the liquidation commenced on 7 February 2013 in respect of fees, party costs and the details of credit notes or deductions provided by joint special liquidators and third party service providers in respect of their fees; the breakdown and basis for same; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [3236/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Marc MacSharry

Ceist:

73. Deputy Marc MacSharry asked the Minister for Finance if he has written or communicated to the joint special liquidators of IBRC since the liquidation commenced on 7 February 2013 in relation to their costs in the liquidation which are estimated to exceed €300 million; if copies of such letters and communications will be provided; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [3238/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Finance)

I propose to take Questions Nos. 70, 71 and 73 together.

The most recent IBRC special liquidation progress update report was published in May 2018 (https://www.finance.gov.ie/updates/ibrc-progress-update-report-year-ended-31-december-2017/) and provides a detailed overview of the fees and all other third party costs associated with the liquidation of IBRC for the period from the date of the liquidation to 31st December 2017.

For the 59 months since the start of the liquidation in February 2013 to 31st December 2017, professional and legal fees for the special liquidation totaled €239m (net of €8m rebate negotiated by the Department of Finance). The Joint Special Liquidators have indicated their expectation that the liquidation of IBRC should be substantially completed by the end of 2022 at a total estimated liquidation cost of between €291m-€306m, however it is important to note that this is subject to change depending on future events which are outside the control of the Joint Special Liquidators.

The net fees earned by the KPMG special liquidation team were €144.9m (net of a €5m rebate). The scope of work undertaken by the Special Liquidators is outlined in detail in each of the five progress update reports, all of which are available on the Department of Finance website. Details of payments made to other significant legal and professional advisors during this period are also set out in that report.

Excluding the cost of regulatory and compliance activity, the overall KPMG liquidation fees have reduced significantly in recent years. It is not my Department's practice to pass out records of the type requested in response to a Parliamentary Question.

Page 44 of the most recent progress update report details the fees paid to legal advisors and other professional advisors for the period from the date of the liquidation to 31st December 2017. 

Page 42 of the most recent progress update report details the cost management undertaken by the Special Liquidators. These are the various steps taken by the Special Liquidators when hiring legal and third party advisors/contractors to ensure costs are managed efficiently and minimized while ensuring the orderly wind up of IBRC.

I am advised that a further progress update report is due to be published by the Special Liquidators in H1 2019 which will provide a further update on fees and costs for the period to 31st December 2018. 

It is not my Department's practice to publish documentation of the type requested in response to a Parliamentary Question.