State Pensions

Ceisteanna (249)

Brendan Ryan

Ceist:

249. Deputy Brendan Ryan asked the Minister for Employment Affairs and Social Protection the position regarding pensioners born from 1 January 1955 onwards but who have to retire at 65 years of age and will not qualify for their pension until they are 67 years of age, such as in the case of a person (details supplied); and if she will make a statement on the matter. [27322/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Employment)

It is well known that people are living for much longer. As a result of this demographic change, the number of State pension recipients is increasing year on year. This has significant implications for the future costs of State pension provision which, arising from these demographic changes alone, are currently increasing by approximately €1 billion every 4 to 5 years.

The purpose of changes to the State pension age is to make the pension system more sustainable in the context of this increasing life expectancy. This sustainability is vital, if the current workers, who fund State pension payments through their PRSI, are to receive a pension themselves when they reach retirement age. Therefore, the Social Welfare and Pensions Act 2011 provided that State pension age will be increased gradually to 68 years. This began in January 2014 with the abolition of the State pension (transition) which was available to people aged 65 who satisfied the qualifying conditions. This measure standardised the State pension age for all at 66 years. This will increase to 67 in 2021 and to 68 in 2028.

In most cases, it is hoped that workers will continue to work up to State pension age, and so the question of claiming a social protection payment would not arise. Where this is not possible and a person loses their employment before reaching State pension age, they may apply for either the jobseeker’s benefit or jobseeker’s allowance schemes. Jobseeker’s payments are currently paid to eligible jobseekers aged 18 to 66 years subject to the person satisfying the general scheme conditions. Social Welfare legislation states that jobseeker payments may be made until the person reaches pensionable age. In this regard, the duration of jobseeker's payments will naturally adjust in line with increases in state pension age into the future.

Jobseekers Benefit is normally paid for 9 months (234 days) for people with 260 or more PRSI contributions paid and for 6 months (156 days) for people with fewer than 260 PRSI contributions paid. Arrangements are in place to provide that jobseekers whose benefit expires in their 65th year can generally continue to be paid benefit up until pensionable age provided they satisfy the necessary contribution conditions, which may be of benefit to the person in the case you have highlighted.

It is important to note that there is no legally mandated retirement age in the State, and the age at which employees retire is a matter for the contract of employment between them and their employers. While such a contract may have been entered into with a retirement date of 65, in the context of the previous State pension arrangements, there is no legal impediment to the employer and employee agreeing to increase the duration of employment for one or more years, if both parties wish to do so. In this regard, the Workplace Relations Commission has produced a Code of Practice on Longer Working and the Irish Human Rights and Equality Commission (IHREC) has published guidance material for employers on the use of fixed-term contracts beyond normal retirement age.

I hope this clarifies the matter for the Deputy.

Disability Allowance Payments

Ceisteanna (250)

Bernard Durkan

Ceist:

250. Deputy Bernard J. Durkan asked the Minister for Employment Affairs and Social Protection when payment in respect of a recently awarded disability allowance will issue in the case a person (details supplied); and if she will make a statement on the matter. [27358/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Employment)

The person concerned has been awarded disability allowance with effect from 20 March 2019 to 25 June 2019. He has been disallowed DA with effect from 26 June 2019 as he is attending a further education course and is being paid by the course provider.

Arrears of payment due will issue as soon as possible once any necessary adjustment is calculated and applied in respect of any overlapping payments (if applicable).

I trust this clarifies the matter for the Deputy.

Exceptional Needs Payment Appeals

Ceisteanna (251)

Bernard Durkan

Ceist:

251. Deputy Bernard J. Durkan asked the Minister for Employment Affairs and Social Protection if a decision to refuse an application for an exceptional needs payment to cover funeral expenses can be reviewed in the case of a person (details supplied); and if she will make a statement on the matter. [27365/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Employment)

The person concerned can seek to have a review of the decision made by Designated Person to refuse her application for an Exceptional Needs Payment, and she has been provided with details on how to initiate the review.

Arrangements have been made by my Department to process the review, and when the review request is received it will be forwarded to a Supplementary Welfare Allowance Review Officer for consideration. The determination of the Review Officer will be notified to the person concerned on completion of the review.

I trust that this clarifies the matter for the Deputy.

Departmental Investigations

Ceisteanna (252, 253)

John Curran

Ceist:

252. Deputy John Curran asked the Minister for Employment Affairs and Social Protection the details of all investigations and reviews undertaken by the scope section of her Department, either solely or in co-operation with the Revenue Commissioners, to address the issue of bogus self-employment over the past five years; and if she will make a statement on the matter. [27373/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

John Curran

Ceist:

253. Deputy John Curran asked the Minister for Employment Affairs and Social Protection the number of cases referred to the scope section of her Department for determination; the number of cases dealt with in under three, three to six, six to 12 and over 12 months, respectively; the number of referrals that resulted in a determination of a person being categorised as an employee in each year; the number of cases appealed; the number of appeals that were successful in each of the past five years to date in tabular form; and if she will make a statement on the matter. [27374/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Employment)

I propose to take Questions Nos. 252 and 253 together.

I am committed to address the issue of false self-employment, and I have put in train a series of measures to deter, detect and tackle it. A key element is the increased focus by Social Welfare Inspectors on the enforcement of PRSI compliance obligations. Inspectors nationwide have commenced a campaign of employer inspections and a new unit is being established to focus specifically on the area of false self-employment.

Deliberate misclassification of employment status is an offence with penalties on prosecution of up to three years imprisonment and/or fines up to €13,000 or twice the amount denied to the Social Insurance Fund as a result of the misclassification, whichever amount is greater. The new unit will ensure that cases of fraudulent misclassification of employment status are prosecuted and that the full force of penalties are applied. To this end, led by my Department, the 2007 Code of Practice on Employment Status will reach the end of a comprehensive revision process next month. This Code will be a vital tool for employers and employees alike so they can be clear when a worker is genuinely self-employed. This document will be circulated to ICTU and IBEC for their input before it is published. In addition, Heads of Bill have already been drafted in order to place the revised Code on a statutory footing later this year.

The question of whether a worker is employed or self-employed is not always a simple one. The Courts have repeatedly stated that a decision must be made based on the specific facts of each case, having regard to key tests such as the level of control a would-be employer has over the worker and the level of obligation they have towards each other.

My strong view is that this is a far better mechanism than trying to capture in legislation a definition that can never be black and white.

I have instructed my officials to also explore a range of legislative proposals to complement the increased inspection work that will be key to the long term success of this project. These proposals include anti-penalisation provisions for workers who will be able to take a claim to the WRC if they are victimised by an employer for raising a query regarding their status; and an increase in penalties for employers who deliberately misclassify employees as being self-employed.

Scope Section of my Department undertakes investigations on foot of requests from a variety of sources, for example employees, employers or Social Welfare Inspectors. These investigations cover a variety of situations, for example, modified classes of PRSI for civil and public servants, family employments or insurability of Directors.

Of all the cases referred to Scope, the number involving the mis-classification of an employee as self-employed constitute a small proportion. A breakdown of cases is not available pre 2018 as the historic database in use in Scope did not allow this categorisation.

The following statistics show the number of decisions made involving situations where employment status was misclassified, and the length of time within which the decisions were made:

Number of cases in sub-category of Employed / Self-Employed (Decision Made)

Decision made within

2018

2019 (to end May)

Decision made within

2018

2019 (to end May)

Under 3 months

33

31

3-6 months

14

9

6-12 months

23

16

Over 12 months

3

3

Total decisions made

73

59

I would point out that these cases do not always involve a deliberate / fraudulent mis-classification of a worker as self-employed. Sometimes it happens that both employer and employee are genuinely mistaken in their approach and are happy to correct the position once the Department’s officials make a determination.

The number of such cases that resulted in a determination of ‘employee’ status (Class A PRSI) was as follows:

Number of cases in sub-category of Employed / Self Employed dealt (Decision made) resulting in Class A determinations

2018

24

2019 (to end May)

22

Cases are not recorded at present to allow statistics to be provided on the number of such cases appealed as a separate category. However, I can confirm that there are currently 11 cases of ‘employed / self-employed’ Scope cases on appeal with the Social Welfare Appeals Office. The following table provides figures for all Scope cases that were appealed to the Appeals Office over the last 5 years:

Scope appeal outcomes 2014 to 2019 (end May)

Allowed

Part allowed

Revised

Disallowed

Withdrawn

Total

Allowed

Part allowed

Revised

Disallowed

Withdrawn

Total

2014

13

4

20

62

17

116

2015

20

0

5

71

11

107

2016

30

4

20

72

13

139

2017

34

4

11

37

53

139

2018

25

3

3

51

13

95

2019

10

1

5

26

11

53

Totals

132

16

64

319

118

649

Scope carries out its own investigations. However, the Inspectors of my Department undertake joint investigations with Inspectors of the Revenue Commissioners and the Workplace Relations Commission where appropriate.

I hope this clarifies the matter for the Deputy.

Invalidity Pension Eligibility

Ceisteanna (254)

John McGuinness

Ceist:

254. Deputy John McGuinness asked the Minister for Employment Affairs and Social Protection if an application for an invalidity pension by a person (details supplied) will be expedited and approved. [27382/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Employment)

Invalidity pension (IP) is a payment for people who are permanently incapable of work because of illness or incapacity and who satisfy the pay related social insurance (PRSI) contribution conditions.

The department received a claim for IP for the lady concerned on 13 March 2019. This claim was disallowed on the grounds that the medical conditions for the scheme were not satisfied. She was notified on 25 June 2019 of this decision, the reasons for it and of her right of review and appeal.

I hope this clarifies the matter for the Deputy.

Jobseeker's Benefit Payments

Ceisteanna (255)

Jackie Cahill

Ceist:

255. Deputy Jackie Cahill asked the Minister for Employment Affairs and Social Protection if a social welfare payment for a person (details supplied) will be paid directly in to their bank account; and if she will make a statement on the matter. [27385/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Employment)

The person concerned made a claim for Jobseekers Benefit on 14 June 2019.

Jobseeker's Benefit and Jobseeker's Allowance are paid weekly in arrears in a post office by Electronic Information Transfer (EIT) where it must be collected in person. Payment is collected in cash, once the customer has provided their Public Services Card or Social Services Card. If using a Social Services Card, a customer will also require photographic ID.

The only exceptions are:

- where a person is employed casually

- a person over 62 years of age in receipt of either of the two payments noted above.

I trust this clarifies the matter for the Deputy.

Disability Allowance Applications

Ceisteanna (256)

Michael Healy-Rae

Ceist:

256. Deputy Michael Healy-Rae asked the Minister for Employment Affairs and Social Protection when a decision will be made on an application by a person (details supplied); and if she will make a statement on the matter. [27387/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Employment)

I confirm that my department received an application for disability allowance (DA) from this lady on 25 April 2019. On completion of the necessary investigations on all aspects of the claim a decision will be made and the person concerned will be notified directly of the outcome.

The processing time for individual DA claims may vary in accordance with their relative complexity in terms of the three main qualifying criteria, the person’s circumstances and the information they provide in support of their claim.

I trust this clarifies the matter for the Deputy.

Community Employment Schemes Eligibility

Ceisteanna (257)

Thomas Pringle

Ceist:

257. Deputy Thomas Pringle asked the Minister for Employment Affairs and Social Protection her plans to extend the time limit for participants of community employment schemes who have mental health difficulties and find their participation in community employment schemes beneficial to managing their mental health; if she will amend the requirements for continuing on a scheme beyond the requisite referral from her Department in addition to being on the live register for over a year with a limit of six years total for participation in a scheme; and if she will make a statement on the matter. [27442/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Employment)

My Department is committed to supporting people with a disability to participate more fully in society and to become more self-sufficient. This is achieved through a number of supports that address barriers that they may face, including the Community Employment (CE) scheme.

CE is an active labour market programme with an aim to enhance the employability and mobility of disadvantaged and unemployed persons by providing work experience and training opportunities for them within their communities. It helps participants to re-enter the active workforce by breaking their experience of unemployment through a return to work routine.

All CE participants are subject to a participation limit. In general the lifetime participation limit is six years in total, however persons qualifying for CE via a disability-related payment can qualify for one further year giving them an overall lifetime participation limit of seven years. These limits are necessary to ensure places are available to other eligible social welfare recipients.

It is also worth noting that the participant's secondary benefits are also protected during his or her engagement on CE with individual circumstances taken into account in determining continuing eligibility.

As the Deputy will be aware, the Government agreed to establish an Interdepartmental Group (IDG) to explore how social inclusion schemes might best be organised into the future including which Department should hold lead responsibility for sponsoring CE schemes focused on social Inclusion. The deliberations of the group may also inform any further consideration to review eligibility criteria along with participation limits.

Social and Affordable Housing Data

Ceisteanna (258)

Barry Cowen

Ceist:

258. Deputy Barry Cowen asked the Minister for Housing, Planning and Local Government the number of social housing units nationally; if an analysis has been undertaken to assess the BER rating of the units; the estimated cost of retrofitting the social housing stock owned by the State; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [27223/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Housing)

There are circa 138,000 social housing units nationally in the ownership of local authorities.

My Department has been funding an Energy Efficiency Retrofitting Programme for these properties since 2013. The Programme has 2 Phases - Phase 1, which comprises the bulk of the work undertaken to date, has focused on the lower cost improvements such as cavity wall and attic insulation, while Phase 2 targets higher cost measures, such as fabric upgrades and glazing/heating upgrades. As local authorities progress further into Phase 2 of this programme, the aim will be to bring the deep retrofit of the social housing stock to the 'cost optimal' equivalent performance, or a BER of B2.

In the period, 2013 to 2018, some €128 million in exchequer funding has been provided under the Programme to improve energy efficiency and comfort levels in almost 68,000 local authority homes. In addition, energy efficiency measures have been incorporated into the 9,000 plus vacant social housing homes that have been returned to productive use under the Voids Programme since 2014.

The cost of carrying out an energy retrofit on a social housing home depends on a wide range of factors including dwelling size, year of construction, dwelling condition, and construction type. While initial indications suggest that investment in the region of €2 billion may be required to complete the retrofitting of the local authority housing stock, a detailed analysis of the stock is planned to profile both the further works required to homes that have had lower cost improvements carried out under Phase 1 and under the Voids Programme, and the works required to the remainder of the stock. Work in this regard will be carried out with local authorities in the context of the application process for funding under the Energy Efficiency Programme in 2020.

Social and Affordable Housing Data

Ceisteanna (259)

Eoin Ó Broin

Ceist:

259. Deputy Eoin Ó Broin asked the Minister for Housing, Planning and Local Government the number of Housing First tenancies created and sustained in 2018; the housing first targets for 2019, 2020 and 2021; and the associated costs of funding one housing first tenancy in tabular form. [27206/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Housing)

Housing First enables people who may have been homeless and who have high levels of complex needs to obtain permanent secure accommodation, with intensive supports, to help them maintain their tenancies. The National Implementation Plan for Housing First, published in September 2018, contains targets for each local authority, with an overall national target of 663 tenancies to be delivered by 2021, including 221 in 2018/19, 222 in 2020 and 221 in 2022. The Dublin Region Housing First Service has housed 276 homeless individuals to end April 2019, of which 87% have successfully retained housing.

In line with the Housing First National Implementation Plan, Housing First is being delivered on a regional basis by the local authorities and the HSE. During 2019, contracts for the delivery of services have been put in place in the Mid-West, South-West and West Regions. The Midlands, Mid-East, North-East, North-West and South East Regions are all advancing procurement processes for the delivery of Housing First across their respective regions.

Due to the individual circumstances of each Housing First client, my Department is not in a position to specify a single representative figure for the cost of a housing first tenancy.

Home Loan Scheme

Ceisteanna (260)

Noel Grealish

Ceist:

260. Deputy Noel Grealish asked the Minister for Housing, Planning and Local Government the timeframe for funds to be released to honour all outstanding applications under the Rebuilding Ireland home loan scheme; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [27275/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Housing)

The Rebuilding Ireland home loan (RIHL) scheme was launched on 1 February of last year.

When the scheme was initially being developed, it was estimated that the drawdown of loans would be approximately €200 million over three years. The RIHL has proven to be more successful than initially anticipated, with some €140 million drawn down to the end of March 2019. The first tranche of funding has not been exhausted.

My officials have been engaging with the Department of Public Expenditure and Reform since October 2018 when higher lending and drawdown volumes were beginning to materialise.

I informed the Dáil on 29 January 2019 of the scheme’s success and of the need for additional funding and indicated that my Department was in discussions with the Department of Public Expenditure and Reform and the Department of Finance with regard to the allocation for 2019.

At all times, the scheme remained open and all local authorities were advised to continue to receive and process applications up to and including the issuing of loans.

My Department has consulted in detail with each Local Authority as to the anticipated demand in its area, and the likely level of approvals expected. This information has been submitted to the Department of Public Expenditure and Reform with request for sanction for additional borrowing by the Housing Finance Agency. The HFA have an ongoing borrowing facility for when sanction is given so that they are in a position to proceed to borrow this second tranche of funding immediately.

The first tranche of funding has not been exhausted, the Rebuilding Ireland Home Loan remains open to new applicants, and local authorities are to continue to receive, process and issue loans.

Proposed Legislation

Ceisteanna (261)

Peter Burke

Ceist:

261. Deputy Peter Burke asked the Minister for Housing, Planning and Local Government the status of the building control Bill; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [27294/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Housing)

The Government has committed to placing the Construction Industry Register Ireland, or CIRI, on a statutory footing. CIRI was established on a voluntary basis in 2014 and over 850 building and contracting entities are currently included on the register.

The Government approved the draft heads of a Bill to place the CIRI on a statutory footing and the Bill was referred to the Joint Oireachtas Committee on Housing, Planning and Local Government for pre-legislative scrutiny. The Committee’s report has since been received and my Department is currently working through the Committee’s recommendations.

The main objective of the legislation is to develop and promote a culture of competence, good practice and compliance with Building Regulations within the builder community of the construction sector. The establishment of a robust, mandatory, statutory register of builders and specialist contractors is an essential consumer protection measure giving those who engage a registered builder the assurance that they are dealing with a competent and compliant operator. In addition, it will complement the reforms made through the Building Control (Amendment) Regulations 2014 and contribute to the development of an enhanced culture of competence and compliance in the construction sector. My Department is working with the Attorney General's Office with a view to achieving publication of the Bill later this year.

Housing Provision

Ceisteanna (262)

Thomas P. Broughan

Ceist:

262. Deputy Thomas P. Broughan asked the Minister for Housing, Planning and Local Government when he expects equilibrium between supply and demand to be reached in the housing market; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [27302/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Housing)

The national housing market is complex; it is composed of numerous sub-markets, specific to geographies, tenure types and housing unit characteristics, and involves a range of specific dynamics, particularly the well documented lags between increased demand and the supply response and the links to land, funding availability and construction industry capacity.

Given the complexity associated with all of these factors, the Government’s Rebuilding Ireland Action Plan focuses on tangible supply outcomes, particularly on accelerating the increased delivery of new homes in the right locations, over the short, medium and long terms.

The Government is working hard to deliver these objectives. More new homes were built in 2018 than in any other year this decade. Indeed in the year to Q1 2019, the Central Statistics Office reports that there were 18,828 new dwelling completions in Ireland, an increase of 25% compared to the previous 12 months. Taking account of new homes completed in Unfinished Housing Developments and vacant homes brought back into use, a total of 22,242 new homes completed available for use in the year to March 2019, 19% up on the previous year. These data, together with other forward looking indicators, such as planning permissions and commencement notices, provide confidence that this increasing trend will continue and for the target of delivering 25,000 new homes annually by 2020 to be achieved. This shows that Rebuilding Ireland's supply-focused actions, such as streamlined and updated planning arrangements, investments in infrastructure and new apartment development and heights guidelines, are delivering results.

Notwithstanding the significant progress made, the Government recognises the need to sustain and build on what has been achieved. The National Planning Framework states that between 2018 and 2040, an annual average output of at least 25,000 new homes will need to be provided. To meet projected population and economic growth as well as increased household formation, annual housing output will need to increase to 30,000 to 35,000 homes per annum in the years to 2027. The Government's focus will remain firmly on securing these further increases in supply.

Local Authority Housing Funding

Ceisteanna (263)

Jan O'Sullivan

Ceist:

263. Deputy Jan O'Sullivan asked the Minister for Housing, Planning and Local Government the grant funding allocated to each local authority for the older persons and disabled persons grant schemes for council-owned homes in each of the years 2016 to 2018, in tabular form; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [27446/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Housing)

My Department provides funding on an annual basis under the Disabled Persons Grants (DPGs) scheme to local authorities for adaptations and extensions to the existing social housing stock to meet the needs of local authority tenants. The scheme applies to works that are necessary to address the needs of older people or people with a disability. This may involve minor adaptations, such as stair-lifts, grabs -rails, showers, wet-rooms, ramps etc., but can also provide funding for more major adaptations such as extensions, for example in the case of overcrowding, or the installation of a downstairs bedroom or bathroom.

Under the DPG scheme, my Department also provides funding for Improvement Works in Lieu (IWIL's) to enable local authorities to repair, improve or extend privately owned houses that are occupied or intended to be occupied by approved housing applicants, as an alternative to the provision of local authority housing.

On top of the exchequer funding amounts, the local authority makes a further 10% contribution in respect of these grants. The detailed administration of these grants, including the assessment, approval and prioritisation of applications, is the responsibility of the local authorities.

Funding allocations are made annually following the overall evaluation of the work proposals and related funding requirements submitted by local authorities. Details of the funding allocations for each local authority during the period 2016 to 2018 are as follows:

Table A: 2016 DPG Allocations

Local Authority

Department Contribution 90%

Local Authority Contribution

10%

Total

(Department and LA contribution)

Carlow County Council

213,175

23,686

236,862

Cavan County Council

297,711

33,079

330,789

Clare County Council

240,293

26,699

266,992

Cork City Council

321,644

35,738

357,383

Cork County Council

728,238

80,915

809,153

Donegal County Council

382,240

42,471

424,711

Dublin City Council

1,957,006

217,445

2,174,452

Dun Laoghaire/Rathdown

County Council

320,623

35,625

356,247

Fingal County Council

448,978

49,886

498,864

Galway City Council

274,390

30,488

304,877

Galway County Council

275,663

30,629

306,292

Kerry County Council

351,171

39,019

390,190

Kildare County Council

402,053

44,673

446,726

Kilkenny County Council

235,072

26,119

261,191

Laois County Council

215,533

23,948

239,482

Leitrim County Council

134,100

14,900

149,000

Limerick City and County Council

940,417

104,491

1,044,908

Longford County Council

181,083

20,120

201,203

Louth County Council

440,227

48,914

489,141

Mayo County Council

301,656

33,517

335,173

Meath County Council

490,715

54,524

545,239

Monaghan County Council

76,410

8,490

84,900

Offaly County Council

239,114

26,568

265,682

Roscommon County Council

77,265

8,585

85,850

Sligo County Council

628,346

69,816

698,162

South Dublin County Council

430,133

47,793

477,926

Tipperary County Council

529,151

58,795

587,945

Waterford City and County Council

294,291

32,699

326,990

Westmeath County Council

197,724

21,969

219,693

Wexford County Council

119,172

13,241

132,413

Wicklow County Council

256,406

28,490

284,895

Total

12,000,000

1,333,333

13,333,333

Table B: 2017 DPG Allocations

Local Authority

Department Contribution

90%

Local Authority Contribution

10%

Total

(Department and LA contribution)

Carlow County Council

265,707

29,523

295,230

Cavan County Council

318,338

35,371

353,709

Clare County Council

274,702

30,522

305,224

Cork City Council

613,296

68,144

681,440

Cork County Council

811,365

90,152

901,517

Donegal County Council

304,047

33,783

337,830

Dublin City Council

1,405,175

156,131

1,561,306

Dun Laoghaire/Rathdown

County Council

327,488

36,388

363,876

Fingal County Council

374,218

41,580

415,798

Galway City Council

271,108

30,123

301,231

Galway County Council

313,776

34,864

348,640

Kerry County Council

255,299

28,367

283,666

Kildare County Council

394,879

43,875

438,754

Kilkenny County Council

304,047

33,783

337,830

Laois County Council

218,405

24,267

242,672

Leitrim County Council

207,992

23,110

231,102

Limerick City and County Council

567,547

63,061

630,608

Longford County Council

244,317

27,146

271,463

Louth County Council

453,985

50,443

504,428

Mayo County Council

261,011

29,001

290,012

Meath County Council

385,664

42,852

428,516

Monaghan County Council

158,269

17,585

175,854

Offaly County Council

280,519

31,169

311,688

Roscommon County Council

141,671

15,741

157,412

Sligo County Council

376,212

41,801

418,013

South Dublin County Council

533,685

59,298

592,983

Tipperary County Council

411,695

45,744

457,439

Waterford City and County Council

285,756

31,751

317,507

Westmeath County Council

242,884

26,987

269,871

Wexford County Council

354,467

39,385

393,852

Wicklow County Council

642,476

71,386

713,862

Total

12,000,000

1,333,333

13,333,333

Table C: 2018 DPG Allocations

Local Authority

Department

Contribution

90%

Local Authority Contribution

10%

Total

(Department and LA Contribution)

Carlow County Council

311,220

34,580

345,800

Cavan County Council

350,598

38,955

389,553

Clare County Council

481,412

53,490

534,903

Cork City Council

1,291,171

143,463

1,434,634

Cork County Council

740,601

82,289

822,890

Donegal County Council

466,102

51,789

517,891

Dublin City Council

1,544,921

171,658

1,716,579

Dun Laoghaire/Rathdown

County Council

387,487

43,054

430,541

Fingal County Council

512,425

56,936

569,361

Galway City Council

367,881

40,876

408,757

Galway County Council

401,673

44,630

446,303

Kerry County Council

423,617

47,069

470,685

Kildare County Council

364,029

40,448

404,477

Kilkenny County Council

296,202

32,911

329,113

Laois County Council

326,003

36,223

362,225

Leitrim County Council

260,550

28,950

289,500

Limerick City and County Council

454,767

50,530

505,296

Longford County Council

296,075

32,897

328,972

Louth County Council

394,456

43,828

438,284

Mayo County Council

209,956

23,328

233,284

Meath County Council

359,543

39,949

399,492

Monaghan County Council

285,011

31,668

316,679

Offaly County Council

313,545

34,838

348,384

Roscommon County Council

314,390

34,932

349,322

Sligo County Council

475,265

52,807

528,072

South Dublin County Council

346,915

38,546

385,461

Tipperary County Council

591,707

65,745

657,453

Waterford City and County Council

318,674

35,408

354,083

Westmeath County Council

339,349

37,705

377,055

Wexford County Council

310,445

34,494

344,939

Wicklow County Council

464,010

51,557

515,567

Total

14,000,000

1,555,556

15,555,556