Wednesday, 3 July 2019

Ceisteanna (171, 172)

Maurice Quinlivan

Ceist:

171. Deputy Maurice Quinlivan asked the Minister for Education and Skills the amount of revenue collected by the national training fund levy in each of the years 2000 to 2018 and to date in 2019; the amount spent from the national training fund in each of the years 2000 to 2018 and to date 2019, in tabular form; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [28391/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Maurice Quinlivan

Ceist:

172. Deputy Maurice Quinlivan asked the Minister for Education and Skills the amount in the national training fund, including funds held in reserve and carried over from underspends in previous years; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [28392/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Education)

I propose to take Questions Nos. 171 and 172 together.

The National Training Fund (NTF) comprises part of the overall annual expenditure ceiling for the Department of Education and Skills.  On that basis NTF spending is subject to the EU expenditure rule which as the Deputy will be aware is designed to ensure that growth in public expenditure is sustainable and supports the achievement of key fiscal targets. 

There has been very substantial growth in NTF spending in recent years on the basis of the +0.1% increase in the Training Levy in both 2018 and 2019 with expenditure increasing by €58m (16%) and €69m (17%) respectively.  This has supported a very significant expansion in NTF priorities. 

The NTF currently supports 18,000 apprentices; 42,000 jobseekers looking for work; 5,000 trainees; 31,000 students in enterprise; 9,247 Springboard courses; 62,000 places on courses to meet skills gaps; and upskilling another 5,000 workers.

As detailed in the National Training Fund Expenditure Report 2019 published last week, €485m is being invested in programmes in 2019 which meet skills needs in the economy, support unemployed people in their journey back to work and assist those in employment to acquire new skills. This includes the expansion of the apprenticeship and traineeship schemes, additional investment in Springboard and additional support to increase skills for those in employment through Skillnet Ireland.

The surplus in the NTF at the end of 2018 amounted to €473m. The accumulated surplus in the NTF has previously been critical in maintaining expenditure levels, particularly in the provision of training for the unemployed, in recession years when NTF income declined.  It is clearly prudent to continue to maintain an adequate surplus in the Fund to meet demand in future years and while the surplus represents a very significant amount, it would only cover twelve month's NTF expenditure at current levels.

A further increase in NTF spending estimated at €70m approximately is expected to take place in 2020 on the basis of the further +0.1% increase in the Training Levy. 

This will be supplemented in 2020 by €60m investment in the Human Capital Initiative (HCI) also funded from the NTF announced in Estimates 2019.  The HCI is a 5-year programme of increased investment in priority skills in higher education amounting to €300m over the period 2020 - 2024.

Details in relation to NTF income and expenditure in each of the years from 2000 to date as requested by the Deputy are in the table.  The Deputy should note that NTF accounts for 2001 include the period from the NTF's establishment on 21 December 2000 to 31 December 2001.

Income from National Training Fund Levy

Total Expenditure from fund

2001

187,921,236

168,941,224

2002

239,000,000

204,583,430

2003

250,000,000

233,722,861

2004

273,000,000

276,678,337

2005

327,000,000

312,738,093

2006

366,000,000

352,718,974

2007

408,000,000

394,589,181

2008

413,000,000

399,146,178

2009

372,000,000

366,482,465

2010

309,000,000

395,221,768

2011

316,000,000

326,269,322

2012

299,000,000

340,896,121

2013

317,000,000

348,804,784

2014

338,000,000

346,906,382

2015

364,000,000

334,210,109

2016

390,000,000

344,399,000

2017

431,000,000

357,230,000

2018

565,500,000

415,394,000

To June 2019

356,000,000

231,793,087