Residential Tenancies Board Administration

Ceisteanna (414)

Mary Lou McDonald

Ceist:

414. Deputy Mary Lou McDonald asked the Minister for Housing, Planning and Local Government the operating cost of the Residential Tenancies Board for 2018 and to date in 2019. [30142/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Housing)

In 2018, my Department provided almost €4.4m in Exchequer funding to the Residential Tenancies Board (RTB) towards operational costs (current expenditure).

Increased Exchequer funding of €7.010m was secured for the Board's 2019 operational costs, to support the on-going delivery of its core functions and to reflect the additional powers and functions conferred on the RTB by the provisions in the Residential Tenancies (Amendment) 2019 Act.

The introduction of these new powers of investigation and the related sanctions regime came into effect from 1 July 2019 and the key provisions of the Act make it a criminal offence for landlords to implement rent increases that contravene the law, that do not adhere to new definitions of a substantial change, or fail to cooperate with an investigation, or fail to register and update tenancies with the RTB. The Act provides powers to the RTB to investigate and administratively sanction landlords who engage in improper conduct including non-compliance with the rent increase restriction in RPZs and allows the RTB to initiate an investigation without the need for a complaint to be made.

€3.5m of the 2019 allocation has been drawn down to end of June 2019, which is in line with the expected profile.

Separate budgetary provision of €0.95m has been provided annually in 2018 and 2019 for capital expenditure. The full amount was drawn down in 2018 and €0.57m of this year's allocation has been drawn down to end June 2019.

The RTB also has access to income from fees for certain of its services, which it also uses to support its operations. Details of the RTB’s own self-financing income and expenditure can be found in the its Annual Reports and Financial Statements, all of which are laid before the Houses of the Oireachtas and are also published on the RTB's website at the following link: https://onestopshop.rtb.ie/rtb-publications/.

Weather Events Response

Question No. 416 withdrawn.

Ceisteanna (415)

Marcella Corcoran Kennedy

Ceist:

415. Deputy Marcella Corcoran Kennedy asked the Minister for Housing, Planning and Local Government if a risk assessment will be carried out on publicly owned trees nationally in view of the recommendations of the review report on severe weather events for a risk managed approach to address the issue of trees and public safety; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [30157/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Housing)

My Department is the Lead Government Department for coordinating the response to severe weather events, including those involving high winds.

One of the most widespread and potentially dangerous consequence of high wind is the risk of trees breaking and/or blowing over, which can disrupt transport networks, as well as posing a danger to motorists and pedestrians in the vicinity. This was the case with ex-Hurricane Ophelia on 16 October 2017, where trees down were reported in many areas across the country, with especially high numbers of roads blocked in the south and south-east regions, as well as resultant damage to electricity supply and communications networks.

Tragically, the three fatalities which occurred during ex-Hurricane Ophelia, were associated with falling trees and breaking branches. The fatalities underlined the public safety risk of this event which informed the decision of the National Emergency Co-ordination Group to advise the public against undertaking non-essential activities or travel on 16 October 2017.

In its role as Lead Government Department, my Department has prepared a review report on the severe weather events which affected Ireland between August 2017 and September 2018. The review report includes recommendations for a risk management approach to address the issue of trees and public safety. It is not seen as feasible or appropriate that trees be individually assessed at all locations. By definition, a risk management approach will involve consideration of a range of factors which could point to an elevated risk to public safety. This subject is relevant for a number of Departments and public bodies, as well as for landowners. Under the Roads Act 1993, local authorities have responsibility for trees in public areas while trees on private lands, including lands adjoining public roads, are the legal responsibility of the land owner.

The Report makes recommendations on the issue of a risk management approach to trees which can impact on public safety. Implementation of recommendations in the Report that fall within the remit of my Department are in hand, and work on those within the remit of the Principal Response Agencies (An Garda Síochána, the Health Service Executive and local authorities) will continue under the aegis of the National Steering Group on Major Emergency Management.

Recommendations in the Report which involve other Government Departments and those which relate to national co-ordination arrangements will be considered and taken forward through the Government Task Force on Emergency Planning.

Question No. 416 withdrawn.

Departmental Bodies Data

Ceisteanna (417)

Catherine Connolly

Ceist:

417. Deputy Catherine Connolly asked the Minister for Housing, Planning and Local Government if he will provide details of all entities in which he or his Department hold shares; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [30187/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Housing)

Details of the relevant entities, and of the number of shares held in them by the Minister for Housing, Planning and Local Government or the Department, are set out in the following table.

Entity

No. of Shares Held

Irish Water

325

Housing Finance Agency

2

It should be noted that the Minister also holds 90% of Ervia stock.

Departmental Contracts Data

Ceisteanna (418)

Martin Heydon

Ceist:

418. Deputy Martin Heydon asked the Minister for Housing, Planning and Local Government the contracts his Department and agencies under his remit are engaged in for the provision of security services; the name of each contractor; the procurement process involved; the duration of each contract; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [30245/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Housing)

My Department engaged Top Security Ltd to provide static security for its Offices at the Custom House, Dublin 1 following a competition held by the Office of Government Procurement under its Security Services Framework. The contract is effective from 11 February 2019 to 10 February 2021.

The information requested in relation to bodies under the aegis of my Department is a matter for the individual bodies concerned. Arrangements have been put in place by each Agency to facilitate the provision of information directly to members of the Oireachtas. The contact email address for each agency is set out in the following table.

Agency

Email address

An Bord Pleanála

Oireachtasqueries@pleanala.ie

Ervia, Gas Networks Ireland

oireachtas@ervia.ie

Housing Sustainable Communities Agency

publicreps@housingagency.ie

Housing Finance Agency

oireachtas.enquiries@hfa.ie

Irish Water

oireachtasmembers@water.ie

Local Government Management Agency

corporate@lgma.ie

Ordnance Survey Ireland

Oireachtas@osi.ie

Property Registration Authority

reps@prai.ie

Pyrite Resolution Board

oireachtasinfo@pyriteboard.ie

Residential Tenancies Board

OireachtasMembersQueries@rtb.ie

Valuation Office

oireachtas.enquiries@VALOFF.ie

Land Development Agency

oireachtas@lda.ie

Office of the Planning Regulator

oireachtas@opr.ie

Departmental Reports

Ceisteanna (419)

Eoin Ó Broin

Ceist:

419. Deputy Eoin Ó Broin asked the Minister for Housing, Planning and Local Government when the quarterly social housing pipeline report will be published; and if it will include Traveller accommodation. [30263/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Housing)

My Department publishes comprehensive status reports on a quarterly basis of all social housing construction schemes for all local authority areas. These reports are known as the Social Housing Construction Status Report (CSR), the most recent of which covers the period up to the end of Q1 2019. The Q1 2019 Social Housing CSR contains scheme by scheme information on the progress of over 20,300 new social housing homes, which are currently approved and progressing through planning, design and construction, as well as homes delivered to end Q1 2019. This report can be found at the following link http://rebuildingireland.ie/news/minister-murphy-publishes-social-housing-construction-status-report-for-q1-2019/.

In relation to Traveller-specific accommodation, a dedicated budget is in place to fund the delivery of this accommodation, based on the requirements identified in local Traveller Accommodation Programmes (TAPs). The funding involved supports the delivery of various types of accommodation, including group housing, halting sites and the refurbishment of existing units.

In line with the commitment in Rebuilding Ireland, and reflecting the disappointing level of overall funding drawdown in recent years, the Housing Agency, in 2017, commissioned a review of funding for Traveller-specific accommodation to date. This review had regard to targets contained in local authority TAPs and actual delivery, the current status of accommodation funded and funding provided for accommodation maintenance and other supports. Following its consideration of the review, the National Traveller Accommodation Consultative Committee recommended that an Independent Expert Group be established to examine and make recommendations on issues regarding Traveller accommodation policy, strategy and implementation. The work of this Expert Group is now at an advanced stage and the Group's report is expected shortly.

In the context of this work, my Department will also review the reporting arrangements on the delivery of Traveller-specific accommodation.

Local Authority Housing Mortgages

Ceisteanna (420)

Eoin Ó Broin

Ceist:

420. Deputy Eoin Ó Broin asked the Minister for Housing, Planning and Local Government if information (details supplied) will be provided in tabular form. [30275/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Housing)

Data in respect of local authority house purchase loans for the period 2000 to Q1 2019, local authority mortgage arrears for the period 2000 to 2018 and information in relation to local authority repossessions of properties for the period 2005 to 2018 that were financed using a local authority home loan and which are now either repossessed, voluntarily surrendered or abandoned is available on my Department's website at the following link: https://www.housing.gov.ie/housing/statistics/house-prices-loans-and-profile-borrowers/local-authority-loan-activity. This data is broken down by local authority area.

The number of forced repossessions by local authorities is low. Repossession is always the last option and local authorities have shown extensive forbearance over the years in refraining from legal pursuit of housing loan arrears. It is inevitable that a small proportion of loans may be deemed unsustainable, by both the local authority and the borrower. In these circumstances, the borrower may opt to voluntarily surrender the house to the local authority, thereby avoiding unnecessary legal and disposal fees. The local authority will also explore the possibility of Voluntary Sale or Local Authority Mortgage to Rent (LAMTR) with a borrower where a mortgage has been deemed unsustainable.

In this regard, it is of note that 435 houses have been dealt with under the Local Authority Mortgage to Rent Scheme from its introduction in 2013 to end 2018. Under the scheme, a local authority can acquire ownership of properties with unsustainable local authority mortgages, thus enabling the household to remain in their home as a social housing tenant. It should be noted that the absence of a Mortgage to Rent scheme for local authority borrowers with unsustainable mortgages would have led to an increase in the repossession statistics. Information on the number and cost of LAMTR cases completed in the period 2013 to 2018, broken down by local authority area, is available on my Department's website at the aforementioned link under the heading "Local Authority Mortgage to Rent".

Repossessed units suitable for social housing are transferred into social housing stock – suitability (or otherwise) is determined by the local authority and considerations would include the location and suitability of each property, in terms of social housing need. Any units that are not considered suitable for social housing can be put to the open market for sale. The funding arrangement for transferring these units into social housing stock covers the lower of the amount owed by the borrower, or the current market value of the property, with some funding also for improvement works where required, to ensure the property is available for early re-letting.

It is considered that the bulk of repossessed properties have been transferred to permanent SH stock since 2013. The table (Table 1) sets out the LA areas where funding has been provided to transfer repossessed units into permanent stock.

To support local authorities in dealing with the shortfalls that arise through LAMTR cases and repossessions, or voluntary surrenders, the Mortgage Arrears Resolution Process Premium Fund was established in 2012. This fund is centrally held by the Housing Finance Agency (HFA) to support the costs arising for local authorities in dealing with unsustainable cases and is contributed to by all local authorities through the application of a MARP premium to all existing and new loans. Allocations from the MARP Premium Fund are managed by a dedicated Adjudication Panel consisting of local authority personnel.

Table: Capital funding provided to local authorities for the bringing into stock of repossessed and surrendered properties

Local Authority

Funding provided since 2013 to date

Carlow

€396,886

Cavan

€174,394

Clare

€667,614

Cork City

€126,518

Cork County

€1,840,197

DLR

€162,726

Donegal

€1,615,492

Dublin City

€22,003,066

Fingal

€519,860

Galway City

€156,103

Galway County

€668,848

Kerry

€507,521

Kildare

€4,033,919

Laois

€724,670

Limerick City and County

€80,000

Longford

€694,770

Louth

€460,701

Mayo

€75,524

Meath

€514,352

Offaly

€163,613

Roscommon

€165,949

Sligo

€117,200

South Dublin

€651,067

Tipperary

€404,234

Waterford City and County

€309,612

Westmeath

€1,001,962

Wexford

€1,051,755

Wicklow

€937,124

Total

€40,225,677

Local Authority Housing Data

Ceisteanna (421)

Brendan Howlin

Ceist:

421. Deputy Brendan Howlin asked the Minister for Housing, Planning and Local Government the estimated cost of building an additional 1,000 social housing units per year on local authority or State owned land; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [30346/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Housing)

There are a number of variables in terms of estimating the cost of providing social housing units e.g. form of delivery, size of unit, land, funding, etc.

The Rebuilding Ireland Action Plan is based on a blended approach to delivery, under which there are a range of delivery mechanisms such as building, leasing and acquisitions. Over 50,000 social housing homes are targeted for delivery over the life of the Plan, and an additional 88,000 households will have their housing need met through Housing Assistance Payment and the Rental Accommodation Scheme. Funding of €6 billion is being provided to support the delivery of Rebuilding Ireland's social housing ambition.

In terms of construction and 'all-in' costs, the averages for a range of differently sized social housing units, based on full capital costs, are set out in the following table. These are based on the analysis of returned data from tendered social housing schemes over an extended period. Construction cost is reflective of building costs (including VAT) and also includes normal site works and site development. All-in cost includes cost of construction, land cost, professional fees, utility connections, site investigations/surveys, archaeology where appropriate, VAT and contribution to public art. Abnormal costs are excluded from these figures.

1 bed

2 bed (1 storey)

2 bed (2 storey)

3 bed

4 bed

Construction

€155,818

€165,132

€174,206

€184,685

€199,491

All-in

€201,359

€212,624

€222,582

€234,571

€252,047

Local Authority Housing Data

Ceisteanna (422)

Brendan Howlin

Ceist:

422. Deputy Brendan Howlin asked the Minister for Housing, Planning and Local Government the number of HAP and RAS recipients, respectively, by council area at the end of 2017, 2018 and in 2019 to date; the projected full year numbers for 2019 in view of the fact the information is not available on the website in this format; the full year costs of each scheme in each year; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [30347/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Housing)

The Housing Assistance Payment (HAP) scheme is a flexible and immediate housing support that is available to all eligible households throughout the State. At the end of Quarter 1 2019, there were 45,900 active tenancies in receipt of HAP support

The following table sets out the number of active HAP tenancies by local authority area at end 2017, end 2018 and end Quarter 1 2019:

Local Authority

Active HAP Tenancies 2017

Active HAP Tenancies 2018

Active HAP Tenancies Q1 2019

Carlow County Council

581

706

707

Cavan County Council

131

275

301

Clare County Council

1193

1335

1332

Cork City Council

1625

2063

2167

Cork County Council

2647

3339

3427

Donegal County Council

1627

1729

1727

Dublin City Council

1027

2219

2594

Dun Laoghaire Rathdown County Council

165

388

437

Fingal County Council

488

1286

1436

Galway City Council

919

1351

1465

Galway County Council

728

981

1052

Kerry County Council

427

898

1002

Kildare County Council

1436

1892

2042

Kilkenny County Council

836

869

866

Laois County Council

316

657

715

Leitrim County Council

95

208

223

Limerick City & County Council

1948

2175

2219

Longford County Council

128

291

297

Louth County Council

1969

2643

2786

Mayo County Council

817

1120

1158

Meath County Council

1220

1740

1804

Monaghan County Council

437

530

555

Offaly County Council

684

845

862

Roscommon County Council

171

354

370

Sligo County Council

467

648

677

South Dublin County Council

2180

2605

2657

Tipperary County Council

1633

1767

1772

Waterford City & County Council

1605

1833

1826

Westmeath County Council

366

656

716

Wexford County Council

536

1020

1131

Wicklow County Council

424

908

1036

Dublin Regional Homeless Executive

2402

4112

4556

Totals

31228

43443

45915

The Rental Accommodation Scheme (RAS) was established in 2005 and requires local authorities to meet the accommodation needs of people that are in receipt of Rent Supplement for 18 months or longer, and who are assessed as having a long-term housing need.

Data for the years 2011 to 2018 on the number and cost of tenancies funded under the Rental Accommodation Scheme (RAS) scheme is available on my Department's website at the following link: http://www.housing.gov.ie/housing/social-housing/social-and-affordble/overall-social-housing-provision.

The most recent RAS tenancy data, broken down per local authority, is detailed in the following table. At the end of March 2019 (Q1) there were a total of 18,697 tenancies supported under the scheme. Data in respect of Q2 2019 is currently being compiled by my Department. It is not possible to accurately predict the number of tenancies that will be supported by RAS at the end of 2019 as numbers in RAS vary as contracts end, tenants move on to other properties, landlords join or withdraw from the scheme, new tenancies are allocated or vacancies in contracted units are filled. Furthermore, towards 2021, as the Housing Assistance Payment (HAP) scheme continues to be rolled out nationally and replaces Rent Supplement, it is expected that more RAS tenancies will terminate than will commence.

Nevertheless, RAS continues to be an effective and secure form of social housing support, and remains a significant part of the suite of social housing options currently available to those who are assessed as being in need of housing support. I am providing €134.3 million to support the cost of RAS in 2019 and this funding will go towards supporting 600 additional RAS tenancies targeted to be achieved by local authorities in 2019 and the ongoing cost of supporting continuing RAS contracts in place at the beginning of 2019.

Local Authority

Total All RAS Tenancies Q1 2019

Carlow Co Council

499

Cavan Co Council

562

Clare Co Council

373

Cork City Council

824

Cork Co Council

857

Donegal Co Council

547

Dublin City Council

1765

Dublin South Co Council

1292

Dun Laoghaire-Rathdown Co Council

528

Fingal Co Council

647

Galway City Council

421

Galway Co Council

324

Kerry Co Council

891

Kildare Co Council

578

Kilkenny Co Council

911

Laois Co Council

218

Leitrim Council

114

Limerick City & Co Council

1145

Longford Co Council

207

Louth Co Council

120

Mayo Co Council

808

Meath Co Council

407

Monaghan Co Council

215

Offaly Co Council

130

Roscommon Co Council

404

Sligo Co Council

541

Tipperary Co Council

1089

Waterford City & Co Council

675

Westmeath Co Council

584

Wexford Co Council

600

Wicklow Co Council

421

Total

18,697

The targets for the HAP and RAS schemes by local authority for 2019 are published on the Rebuilding Ireland website and are available at the following link:

http://rebuildingireland.ie/news/social-housing-targets-2019/.

The information requested in respect of the cost of the HAP and RAS schemes is set out in the following table.

Year

HAP (€m)

RAS (€m)

2017

152.69

142.8

2018

276.6

143.4

2019 (Allocated)

422

134.3

HAP and RAS continue to be key vehicles in meeting housing need and fulfilling the ambitious programme outlined under the Rebuilding Ireland Action Plan for Housing and Homelessness.

Building Regulations

Ceisteanna (423)

Catherine Martin

Ceist:

423. Deputy Catherine Martin asked the Minister for Housing, Planning and Local Government when the submissions received relating to TGD F of the building regulations and the documents constituting his consideration of the submissions will be put on his Department's website. [30398/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Housing)

Amendments to Part L of the Building Regulations, giving effect to Nearly Zero Energy Building (NZEB) Regulations and Major Renovation Regulations, were published earlier this year. The regulations aim to make all new residential dwellings 70% more energy efficient than the performance requirements in 2005. In conjunction with this, amendments to Part F of the Building Regulations were published, which relate to ventilation. The NZEB standard is achieved, in part, through improved air tightness in a building.

The public consultation on the review of Part F and Part L of the Building Regulations took place from April 9 to June 8 2018. Over 1,000 comments/submissions were received, 303 of which were in relation to Part F. These were assessed and taken into consideration when Part F of the Building Regulations and the accompanying technical guidance was reviewed. These will be published on my Department's website over the coming weeks, subject to respecting any data protection and commercial confidentiality issues that may arise.

Calafoirt agus Céanna

Ceisteanna (424)

Pearse Doherty

Ceist:

424. D'fhiafraigh Deputy Pearse Doherty den Aire Cultúir, Oidhreachta agus Gaeltachta an féidir léi an t-eolas is déanaí a chur ar fáil faoin dul chun cinn atá á dhéanamh ag an Roinn chun bonneagar úr a fhorbairt ag Cé Mhachaire Rabhartaigh i gContae Dhún na nGall; agus an ndéanfaidh sí ráiteas ina thaobh. [30114/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Culture)

Mar is eol don Teachta, tá Cé Mhachaire Rabhartaigh faoi chúram Chomhairle Chontae Dhún an nGall. Tá an cé seo san áireamh mar cheann de na tograí atá le forbairt faoin bPlean Forbartha Náisiúnta.

Mar chuid den phróiseas forbartha, tá iarrtha ag mo Roinn ar an gComhairle Chontae Cás Gnó ina leith a ullmhú faoi réir théarmaí an Chód Caiteachais Phoiblí. Cuirfidh torthaí an Cháis Gnó sin i bhfios don Chomhairle agus do mo Roinn an chéad chéim eile a bhainfidh leis an togra, ag cur an allúntas airgid atá ar fáil do mo Roinn agus na n-éileamh éagsúla ar an allúntas sin san áireamh.

Boat Permits

Ceisteanna (425)

Brendan Griffin

Ceist:

425. Deputy Brendan Griffin asked the Minister for Culture, Heritage and the Gaeltacht further to Parliamentary Question No. 723 of 2 July 2019, if the 1997 agreement made with boatmen (details supplied) in County Kerry will be honoured and included in the conditions of their P5 licences; and if she will make a statement on the matter. [30158/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Culture)

The historical agreement referred to was between the parties whose names are included on the document. My Department is not (and was not) party to this document and it has no status with regard to the Department’s governance of the lakes. This has been repeatedly communicated to the person referred to in details supplied.

As outlined in my previous response, the individual in question has not provided all the required documentation in the tender competition checklist. The Department has been in ongoing contact seeking the documents required and the applicant has been afforded time and opportunity to lodge the correct documentation. When the correct documents, including the requisite fee are lodged, I will then make a decision on whether to award the licence.

Departmental Shareholdings

Ceisteanna (426)

Catherine Connolly

Ceist:

426. Deputy Catherine Connolly asked the Minister for Culture, Heritage and the Gaeltacht if she will provide details of all entities in which she or her Department holds shares; and if she will make a statement on the matter. [30180/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Culture)

I am advised that neither I, as Minister, nor my Department are designated owners of shares in any entities as described by the Deputy.

Departmental Contracts Data

Ceisteanna (427)

Martin Heydon

Ceist:

427. Deputy Martin Heydon asked the Minister for Culture, Heritage and the Gaeltacht the contracts her Department and agencies under her remit are engaged in for the provision of security services; the name of each contractor; the procurement process involved; the duration of each contract; and if she will make a statement on the matter. [30238/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Culture)

I am advised that my Department and those agencies under its remit are engaged in a number of contracts for the provision of security services as listed in the following tables. When engaging security services my Department is committed to public procurement procedures and value for money. A number of contracts such as those awarded for keyholding duties are subject to annual review, and a number have been renewed. The value of these contracts is considerably below the threshold necessary for the conduct of a formal procurement process.

Department of Culture Heritage and the Gaeltacht: Reviewed annually

Name of contractor

Site

Nature of Service

Duration of contract

Synergy Security Solutions

North King St. Smithfield Dublin 7

Front Desk (opening & closing)

2 years from January 2019

Secure-All Security

Coole Park Visitor Centre, Co. Galway

Keyholding (opening and closing)

Reviewed annually

Noonan Services

New Road, Killarney, Co. Kerry

Keyholding

Reviewed annually

Noonan Services

Mahon, Co. Cork

Keyholding

Reviewed annually

G4S

Furbo, Co. Galway

Keyholding

Reviewed annually

Securitas Security Services Ltd

Custom House, Druid Lane, Galway

Keyholding

Reviewed annually

Fresco Security Ltd

Killarney House and Gardens, Co. Kerry

Keyholding

Reviewed annually

Crimewatch Fire and Security

Wexford Wildfowl Reserve

Keyholding

Reviewed annually

Secure-All Security

Millennium House, Loughrea, Co. Galway

Keyholding

Reviewed annually

Shepherd Security

Knocksink, Co. Wicklow

Keyholding

Reviewed annually

Bodies under the aegis of the Department of Culture Heritage and the Gaeltacht

Name of Agency

Name of Contractor

Nature of Service

Duration of Contract

Arts Council

Accent Solutions

Access control, Keyholding and Out of hours security services

3 years from March 2016 (Extended by 12 months in 2019)

Coimisinéir Teanga

Noonan Services Group

Keyholding

Reviewed annually

Crawford Art Gallery

Synergy Security Solutions Ltd

Keyholding Out of hours security services and Front Desk

3 years from June 2019

Foras na Gaeilge

G4S Security

Keyholding and Out of hours security service

Contract commenced 2013 and subject to annual review

Heritage Council

Sentry Security

Static security, Keyholding (opening and closing), Out of hours security services and Alarm monitoring and maintenance

2 years from December 2018

Irish Museum Modern Art

Synergy Security Solutions

Out of hours security services

3 Years from 2018

National Archives

Securaway At Risk Security Group Limited T/A SAR Security

Static security (National Archives building in Bishop Street.)

2 years from May 2017 (option to extend the contract a maximum of twice for twelve month periods)

National Concert Hall

Manguard Plus

Static security and remote monitoring security services

Contract commenced Jan 2014

National Gallery of Ireland

Noonan Services Group Limited

Out of hours security services

3 years from March 2018

National Library of Ireland

Top Security

NLI Kildare St.: Out of hours security services National Photographic Archive: Front desk

2 years from January 2018 (option to extend by up 2 additional years)

National Library of Ireland

Noonan

Keyholding (Park west Facility and National Photographic Archive)

Contract commenced Jan 2011 (New tender in progress)

National Museum of Ireland

Synergy Security Solutions Ltd.

Static Security, Keyholding, Alarm monitoring and maintenance

Four years from 2015 – 2019 (New tender in progress)

Screen Ireland

Securitas

Keyholding

One year from November 2018

Screen Ireland

DNA Security

Alarm monitoring and maintenance and CCTV (Dublin Office)

Contract commenced May 2017, reviewed annually

Screen Ireland

Gallant Security

Alarm monitoring and maintenance (Dublin Office)

Contract commenced May 2008, reviewed annually

Screen Ireland

Secure All Security

Keyholding (Galway Office)

Contract commenced May 2006, reviewed annually

Screen Ireland

Centaur Alarms

Alarm monitoring and maintenance (Galway Office)

Contract commenced May 2007, reviewed annually

Waterways Ireland

MCM Technology of Cork

Alarm monitoring and maintenance (Scarriff Regional Offices)

Contract commenced May 2006, reviewed annually

Waterways Ireland

Nightguard

Alarm monitoring and maintenance (Portumna Office)

One year from November 2018

Waterways Ireland

Visiconnex

CCTV surveillance and hailing system (Fenniscourt Depot)

Contract commenced September 2011, reviewed annually

Waterways Ireland

Sure – Security Services

CCTV monitoring (Tullamore, Lowtown, Deey Bridge and 13th Lock Gate)

Two years from May 2018

Waterways Ireland

Vodafone Ltd

Dry Dock vessel surveillance (Scarriff Harbour)

Five years from July 2017