Friday, 6 September 2019

Ceisteanna (1485, 1518)

Éamon Ó Cuív

Ceist:

1485. Deputy Éamon Ó Cuív asked the Minister for Communications, Climate Action and Environment the average number of new vehicles sold here in each of the past 10 years; the number of electric vehicles cars sold in each of the past ten years; his plans based on this to ensure a million electric vehicles will be registered here by 2030; the yearly targets for the sale of electric vehicles that inform this policy; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [34905/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Thomas P. Broughan

Ceist:

1518. Deputy Thomas P. Broughan asked the Minister for Communications, Climate Action and Environment if he has examined the roll-out of charging infrastructure for electric vehicles and incentives for persons to change to EVs in other jurisdictions, in particular Scandinavia, which may provide templates for action here to decarbonise transport systems; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [35716/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Communications)

I propose to take Questions Nos. 1485 and 1518 together.

The following table provides data on new vehicles licensed for the first time over the last ten years in Ireland which is available from the Central Statistics Office. The data shown include the total number of new vehicles, the number of new battery electric vehicles (BEVs) and the number of new plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) licensed in each year. It should be noted that data on new PHEVs prior to 2015 is not readily available.

Year

New Vehicles

New BEVs

New PHEVs

2009

73,125

59

2010

103,076

66

2011

105,761

103

2012

95,093

215

2013

92,887

72

2014

117,652

238

2015

153,850

497

123

2016

181,293

411

286

2017

161,840

664

261

2018

157,865

1,328

727

As part of the Climate Action Plan, which was published in June of this year, the Government set a target of 936,000 electric vehicles to be on the road by 2030. While no annual targets were set out in the plan, the modelling that provides an analytical foundation for the plan indicates a level of circa 180,000 would need to be achieved by 2025.

The Climate Action Plan sets out a range of actions that will support the delivery of the Government's target. This includes a strong focus on developing the charging infrastructure necessary to stay sufficiently ahead of demand. The policies and measures put in place to develop the charging infrastructure will include examination of international examples with high electric vehicle uptake.

Under the first call for applications from the Climate Action Fund, I approved funding of up to €10 million to support ESB eCars to develop a nationwide, state-of-the-art electric vehicle fast charging network.

Last week, I announced funding to support the rollout by Local Authorities of up to 1,000 on-street public charge points for electric vehicles over the next 5 years. The SEAI will administer this support and are currently developing the detailed terms and conditions for the scheme which I expect to open for applications later this month.

A support scheme is also in place to support electric vehicle charging at home This scheme provides grant aid of up to €600 to support the purchase and installation of a home charger, for purchasers of new and second-hand electric vehicles.

In addition, there is a generous range of supports available to support the purchase of electric vehicles. These supports include a purchase grant of up to €5,000; Vehicle Registration Tax relief of up to €5,000; Accelerated Capital Allowances; Benefit-in-Kind relief for battery electric vehicles; and a discount on tolls of up to 50%.