Thursday, 17 October 2019

Ceisteanna (151)

Niamh Smyth

Ceist:

151. Deputy Niamh Smyth asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the number of persons in direct provision by county in tabular form; the length of time they have been in direct provision; the supports being made available to them; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [42681/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Justice)

As the Deputy will be aware, the State has a legal obligation to offer accommodation, food and a range of other services (including utilities and healthcare etc.) to any person who claims a right to international protection in Ireland while their claim is being examined.

A whole-of-Government approach to direct provision means that several Government Departments and Agencies work closely together to ensure the necessary supports and services are provided to persons in direct provision. My Department offers accommodation and related services; the Department of Employment Affairs and Social Protection pays a weekly personal allowance to each resident and covers any exceptional needs; the Department of Education and Skills provide school places for children resident in the centres and provides that children also have access to the free pre-school scheme, the Early Childhood Care and Education Programme; and the HSE provides mainstreamed health services to residents.

I am advised by the International Protection Accommodation Services (IPAS) of my Department that as of 13 October 2019, there are 6,066 people residing in 38 accommodation centres in the State, the locations of which are set out in the following table.

As these centres are currently operating at full capacity, there are also a further 1,478 people being accommodated in emergency accommodation in hotels and guest houses. My Department does not disclose the location of emergency accommodation centres in order to protect the identity of international protection applicants.  

IPAS Accommodation (as of 13 October 2019)

COUNTY

LOCATION

ADDRESS

CURRENT OCCUPANCY

Dublin

Balseskin

St. Margarets, Finglas, Dublin 11

 433

Clare

Knockalisheen

Meelick

 245

 

King Thomond

The Bog Road, Lisdoonvarna

 127

Cork

Ashbourne House

Glounthaune

 89

 

Davis Lane

73-75 Davis Street, Mallow, Co. Cork

 57

 

Kinsale Road

Cork

 277

 

Glenvera

Wellington Road

 124

 

Millstreet

Millstreet

 300

 

Clonakilty Lodge

Clonakilty, Co. Cork

 108

Dublin

The Towers

The Ninth Lock, Clondalkin, Dublin 22

 236

Galway

Eglington

The Proms, Salthill

 195

 

Great Western House

Eyre Square

 146

Kerry

Atlas House (Killarney)

Killarney

 90

 

Atlas House (Tralee)

Tralee

 100

 

Atlantic Lodge

Kenmare

 91

 

Johnston Marina

Tralee

 81

 

Linden House

New Road, Kilarney

 55

 

Park Lodge

Killarney

 44

Kildare

Hazel

Dublin Road, Monasterevin

 120

 

Eyrepowell

Newbridge

 139

Laois

Hibernian Hotel

Main Street, Abbeyleixm, Co. Laois

 51

 

Montague

Emo, Portlaoise

 206

Limerick

Hanratty's

Glentwirth Street, Limerick

 117

 

Mount Trenchard

Foynes, Co. Limerick

 83

Longford

Richmond Court

Richmond Street, Longford

 79

Louth

Carroll Village

Dundalk

 71

Mayo

The Old Convent

Ballyhaunis

 217

Meath

Mosney

Mosney

 735

Monaghan

St. Patricks

Monaghan

 214

Sligo

Globe House

Chapel Hill

 199

Tipperary

Bridgewater House

Carrick-on-Suir, Co. Tipperary

 152

Waterford

Atlantic House

Tramore, Co. Waterford

 80

 

Ocean View

Tramore, Co. Waterford

 99

 

Birchwood

Ballytruckle Road

 147

 

Viking House

Coffee House Lane

 81

Wicklow

The Grand Hotel

Abbey Street, Wicklow

 93

Westmeath

Temple Accommodation

Horseleap, Moate, Westmeath

 89

 

Athlone

Athlone

 296

Length of Stay of IPAS Applicants in Direct Provision (as of 11 October 2019)

BY MONTH

BY NUMBER OF APPLICANTS

0>3

1073

3>6

810

6>9

629

9>12

614

12>18

1009

18>24

918

24>36

844

36>48

766

48>60

528

60>72

188

72>84

71

84+

116

TOTAL

7566

In relation to the length of time applicants spend in the international protection process, while some individuals may live for many years in direct provision centres, these are generally applicants who have received previous negative decisions and are exercising their right to appeal through the courts.

My Department has introduced a number of measures aimed at reducing the time taken to determine applications. The International Protection Act, 2015, introduced the single procedure process for the determination of protection applications. Under the single procedure all elements of a person's protection claim (refugee status, subsidiary protection status and permission to remain) are considered together rather than sequentially. The aim of the single procedure is to help reduce waiting times significantly.

An applicant who applies for international protection today can expect to receive a first instance recommendation/decision within approximately 15 months, provided that no complications arise. Prioritised cases are being processed in just under 9 months. Prioritised applications include those from countries such as Syria and Eritrea and from especially vulnerable groups of applicants, such as unaccompanied minors.  My Department is aiming to reduce processing times for all first instance decisions to 9 months by the end of this year.