Immigration Status

Ceisteanna (99)

Bernard Durkan

Ceist:

99. Deputy Bernard J. Durkan asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the status of a Nigerian national who is in this jurisdiction and in a permanent relationship; if their case falls to be dealt with under the terms of the Dublin Convention or otherwise post-Brexit; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [47016/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Justice)

I must inform the Deputy that nationals of Nigeria require a visa to travel to Ireland and may be granted permission to enter the state by an immigration officer at the port of entry.  Should the Nigerian national have applied to come to Ireland to join his or her spouse, civil partner or de facto partner who is legally resident here, it would be necessary for them to register with the immigration office in the area in which they reside. 

However, as the Deputy has not provided any detail about the person on whose behalf he has put his question, I am not in a position to advise further. 

Queries in relation to the status of individual immigration cases may be made directly to my Department by e-mail using the Oireachtas Mail facility, which has been specifically established for this purpose. This service enables up to date information on such cases to be obtained without the need to seek information by way of the Parliamentary Questions process. The Deputy may consider using the e-mail service except in cases where the response is, in the Deputy’s view, inadequate or too long awaited.

Family Reunification Policy

Ceisteanna (100)

Bernard Durkan

Ceist:

100. Deputy Bernard J. Durkan asked the Minister for Justice and Equality if family reunification terms will be made available to a person (details supplied); and if he will make a statement on the matter. [47017/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Justice)

I can inform the Deputy that detailed information on the circumstances in which the person concerned can seek to sponsor a non-EEA national family member to join and reside with them in the State is contained in the Government's Policy Document on Non-EEA Family Reunification.  This information can be accessed on my Department's Immigration Service website -  www.inis.gov.ie/en/INIS/Pages/immigration-policy-family-reunification. 

The policy document provides a comprehensive statement of national immigration policy in respect to family reunification.  The requirements outlined in the document apply to all decision making in relation to family reunification cases where ministerial discretion applies, including long stay (join family) visa applications. 

If the person's family members are visa required nationals they must seek the appropriate visa for their circumstances.  Each visa application is considered on its individual merits having regard to all of the information and documentation available to the visa officer at the time.  The onus rests at all times with the applicant to satisfy the visa officer that the particular visa sought should be granted.  Guidelines on how to apply for particular types of visas are available on my Department's Immigration Service website -  www.inis.gov.ie.

Queries in relation to the status of individual immigration cases may be made directly to my Department by e-mail using the Oireachtas Mail facility, which has been specifically established for this purpose. This service enables up to date information on such cases to be obtained without the need to seek information by way of the Parliamentary Questions process. The Deputy may consider using the e-mail service except in cases where the response is, in the Deputy's view, inadequate or too long awaited.

Naturalisation Applications

Ceisteanna (101)

Bernard Durkan

Ceist:

101. Deputy Bernard J. Durkan asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the position in respect of a determination of eligibility for naturalisation in the case of a person (details supplied); and if he will make a statement on the matter. [47018/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Justice)

I can inform the Deputy that the application for a certificate of naturalisation from the person referred to was received on 16 January 2019. Applications are processed, in the chronological order in which they are received, with a view to establishing whether the applicants meet the statutory conditions for the granting of naturalisation.  The application will be submitted to me for decision as expeditiously as possible. If further documentation is required it will be requested from the applicants in due course. 

As the Deputy will appreciate, the granting of Irish citizenship through naturalisation is a privilege and an honour which confers certain rights and entitlements not only within the State but also at European Union level and it is important that appropriate procedures are in place to preserve the integrity of the process.

It is recognised that all applicants for citizenship would wish to have a decision on their application without delay. However, the nature of the naturalisation process is such that, for a broad range of reasons, some cases will take longer than others to process.  In some instances, completing the necessary checks can take a considerable period of time.

Queries in relation to the status of individual immigration cases may be made directly to the Immigration Service of my Department by e-mail using the Oireachtas Mail facility which has been specifically established for this purpose. This service enables up to date information on such cases to be obtained without the need to seek information by way of the Parliamentary Questions process. The Deputy may consider using the e-mail service except in cases where the response from the Immigration Service is, in the Deputy’s view, inadequate or too long awaited.

Naturalisation Applications

Ceisteanna (102)

Bernard Durkan

Ceist:

102. Deputy Bernard J. Durkan asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the position in respect of a determination of eligibility for naturalisation in the case of a person (details supplied); and if he will make a statement on the matter. [47019/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Justice)

An application for a certificate of naturalisation was received in my Department from the person referred to by the Deputy on 20 November 2018. Applications are processed, in the chronological order in which they are received, with a view to establishing whether the applicants meet the statutory conditions for the granting of naturalisation.  The application will be submitted to me for decision as expeditiously as possible once processing is completed. If further documentation is required it will be requested from the applicant in due course.  

As the Deputy will appreciate, the granting of Irish citizenship through naturalisation is a privilege and an honour which confers certain rights and entitlements not only within the State but also at European Union level and it is important that appropriate procedures are in place to preserve the integrity of the process.

Queries in relation to the status of individual immigration cases may be made directly to the INIS of my Department by e-mail using the Oireachtas Mail facility which has been specifically established for this purpose. This service enables up to date information on such cases to be obtained without the need to seek information by way of the Parliamentary Questions process. The Deputy may consider using the e-mail service except in cases where the response from the INIS is, in the Deputy’s view, inadequate or too long awaited.

Naturalisation Applications

Ceisteanna (103)

Bernard Durkan

Ceist:

103. Deputy Bernard J. Durkan asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the progress to date in the determination of eligibility for naturalisation in the case of a person (details supplied); and if he will make a statement on the matter. [47020/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Justice)

An application for a certificate of naturalisation from the person referred to by the Deputy is currently being considered by my Department. On completion of the necessary processing, the application will be submitted to me for decision as expeditiously as possible. Should further documentation be required it will be requested from the applicant in due course.

As the Deputy will appreciate, the granting of Irish citizenship through naturalisation is a privilege and an honour which confers certain rights and entitlements not only within the State but also at European Union level and it is important that appropriate procedures are in place to preserve the integrity of the process.

Queries in relation to the status of individual immigration cases may be made directly to the INIS of my Department by e-mail using the Oireachtas Mail facility which has been specifically established for this purpose. This service enables up to date information on such cases to be obtained without the need to seek information by way of the Parliamentary Questions process. The Deputy may consider using the e-mail service except in cases where the response from my department is, in the Deputy’s view, inadequate or too long awaited.

Naturalisation Applications

Ceisteanna (104)

Bernard Durkan

Ceist:

104. Deputy Bernard J. Durkan asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the progress to date in the determinisation of eligibility for naturalisation in the case of a person (details supplied); and if he will make a statement on the matter. [47021/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Justice)

An application for a certificate of naturalisation from the person referred to by the Deputy was received in my Department on 7 May 2019. This application is currently being processed with a view to establishing whether the applicant meets the statutory conditions for the granting of naturalisation.

On completion of the necessary processing the application will be submitted to me for decision as expeditiously as possible.

As the Deputy will appreciate, the granting of Irish citizenship through naturalisation is a privilege and an honour which confers certain rights and entitlements not only within the State but also at European Union level and it is important that appropriate procedures are in place to preserve the integrity of the process.

Queries in relation to the status of individual immigration cases may be made directly to my Department by e-mail using the Oireachtas Mail facility which has been specifically established for this purpose. This service enables up to date information on such cases to be obtained without the need to seek information by way of the Parliamentary Questions process. The Deputy may consider using the e-mail service except in cases where the response from my Department is, in the Deputy’s view, inadequate or too long awaited.

Deportation Orders Re-examination

Ceisteanna (105)

Bernard Durkan

Ceist:

105. Deputy Bernard J. Durkan asked the Minister for Justice and Equality when a decision to deport will be set aside in the case of a person (details supplied); and if he will make a statement on the matter. [47022/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Justice)

As previously advised, the person concerned is the subject of a Deportation Order, signed on 11 March 2005.  Representations were received from the person concerned, pursuant to the provisions of Section 3(11) of the Immigration Act 1999 (as amended), requesting that the Deportation Order be revoked.  Following detailed consideration of the information submitted in support of the request, the Deportation Order was affirmed and notified to the person concerned by letter dated 4 April 2019.  I am further informed that there are no outstanding applications or appeals for this applicant.  

The Deportation Order requires the person to remove themselves from the State and remain outside the State.  The enforcement of the Deportation Order is a matter for the Garda National Immigration Bureau. 

Queries in relation to the status of individual immigration cases may be made directly to the Immigration Service of my Department by e-mail using the Oireachtas Mail facility which has been specifically established for this purpose.  This service enables up to date information on such cases to be obtained without the need to seek information by way of the Parliamentary Questions process.  The Deputy may consider using the e-mail service except in cases where the response from the Immigration Service is, in the Deputy's view, inadequate or too long awaited.

InterTradeIreland

Ceisteanna (106)

Robert Troy

Ceist:

106. Deputy Robert Troy asked the Minister for Business, Enterprise and Innovation the details of the Halo Business Angel Network run by InterTradeIreland; the current and capital budget allocation for the programme in each of the years 2016 to 2020, in tabular form; the number of participants in each year of the programme; and the maximum funding permitted for each successful investment. [46991/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Business)

The Halo Business Angels Network, operated by InterTradeIreland (ITI), helps companies raise new equity capital in the early stages of their development. It also represents an alternative source of investment to venture capital funding.

The term “Business Angels” refers to high net worth individuals who invest on their own, or as part of a syndicate, in high growth businesses. In addition to capital, they often make their own skills, experience and contacts available to the company concerned to help it grow and develop. The individual amounts invested by Business Angels are usually in the range of €25,000 to €250,000, although syndicated deals (where a group of angels invest together) can be up to €1m.

I understand there is no maximum limit set by ITI on an investment through the initiative, as this is a matter for the investor and the company to determine themselves. I am informed as well that those that invest in companies are not considered as “participants”, given that they engage directly with the firms on the nature of their investment.

The Network has achieved positive results. In 2016, for example, a total of 50 deals – totalling €14 million – were reached through the initiative. In 2017 and 2018 there 33 and 34 deals respectively, with a value of €7.7 million and €5.9 million.

ITI’s budget for the Network, which is used to help promote the initiative and link investors with high growth firms, has amounted to the following since 2016:

2016 - £298,250

2017 - £326,000

2018 - £345,000

2019 - £410,843

The budget for the Network in 2020 is currently estimated to be £407,302.

Community Enterprise Centres

Ceisteanna (107)

Robert Troy

Ceist:

107. Deputy Robert Troy asked the Minister for Business, Enterprise and Innovation the name and location of each community enterprise centre by county, in tabular form; the current and capital budget allocation for community enterprise centres in each of the years 2016 to 2020, in tabular form; and the number of staff employed in each community enterprise centre on account basis. [46992/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Business)

My Department is committed to supporting enterprise development throughout the country. Enterprise Ireland (EI), has approved funding to enable community groups throughout the country to develop the entrepreneurial talent in their area and support innovative business ideas to create jobs.

In the period 2016 and to date in 2019, Enterprise Ireland has supported community enterprise centres under the following three competitive schemes:  

- Community Enterprise Centre Scheme;

- Community Enterprise Initiative Scheme; and

- Regional Enterprise Development Fund

Community Enterprise Centre Scheme

Enterprise Ireland has co-funded, with local enterprise development groups, a total of 164 Community Enterprise Centres across the country with payments totalling €44 million. There is now a Community Enterprise Centre located in every county. Table One in the following link provides details of each of these Community Enterprise Centres by County.

Table 1 Community Enterprise Centres by County

In January 2012, the agency provided €2m, via competitive competition, to support the role of a Business Development Function/Manager in Community Enterprise Centres.

The CECs collectively employ approximately 6,000 people across 1,200 companies and are key hubs of enterprise activity in many areas.

Payments made by Enterprise Ireland to Community Enterprise Centres under this scheme in the period 2016 to date in 2019 was approximately €1.16 million. Details of payments made by Enterprise Ireland to each centre is outlined in table two.

Table 2: Payments under the Community Enterprise Centre Scheme during the period 2016 to date in 2019.

Community Enterprise Centre

County

2016

2017

2018

2019 to date

Castlecomer Enterprise Group Company Limited By Guarantee

Kilkenny

€30,607.95

Leitrim County Enterprise Fund

Leitrim

€11,112.76

Firies Community Enterprise Development Ltd

Kerry

€22,723.65

Brookpark Enterprise Centre Company Limited By Guarantee

Cork County

€87,939.49

€189,224.39

€67,982.84

€82,005.81

Westport Multi-Agency Enterprise Company Limited By Guarantee

Mayo

€445,536.00

Drogheda Enterprise Centre Company Limited By Guarantee

Louth

€175,382.85

€28,976.47

Mitchelstown Community Forum Company Limited By Guarantee

Cork County

€25,853.99

 

Enterprise Ireland’s Regional Team monitor the progress of funded Community Enterprise Centres.  However, employment figures for each funded centre are not available as Enterprise Ireland does not collect information on the number of jobs per Community Enterprise Centre.  

Community Enterprise Initiative Scheme

This competitive scheme was open to new and existing organisations, groups and alliances, who collaboratively seek to promote entrepreneurship, create jobs, foster innovation and enhance export opportunities for small business. In 2016, Enterprise Ireland approved 32 Community Centres for funding under this scheme. A total of €1.9 million has been paid by Enterprise Ireland to community enterprise centres under this scheme during the period 2016 to date in 2019.   Table three provides payment details by Centre.

Table 3: Payments under the Community Enterprise Initiative Scheme during the period 2016 to date in 2019.

Community Enterprise Centres

County

2016

2017

2018

2019 to date

Crafts Council Of Ireland Company Limited By Guarantee

Kilkenny

€60,623

€185,377

Ballyhoura Development Company Limited By Guarantee

Limerick

€25,000

€18,390

Ird Kiltimagh Company Limited By Guarantee

Mayo

€25,000

€35,482

€8,435

Bailieborough Development Association Company Limited By Guarantee

Cavan

€9,152

€13,275

Innovate Dublin Communities Company Limited By Guarantee

Dublin

€50,000

€36,142

€2,885

Convoy Enterprise Centre Company Limited By Guarantee

Donegal

€25,000

€25,000

Creative Spark Company Limited By Guarantee

Louth

€25,000

€51,843

Ballinasloe Area Community Development Ltd

Galway

€24,500

€25,500

Meath Enterprise Centre Company Company Limited By Guarantee

Meath

€50,000

Enniscorthy Enterprise & Technology Centre Ltd

Wexford

€25,000

€35,000

Arklow Business Enterprise Centre Ltd

Wicklow

€50,000

Ferbane Business And Technology Park Company Limited By Guarantee

Offaly

€17,500

€64,421

Sccul Enterprises Company Limited By Guarantee

Galway

€59,431

€25,000

€45,907

Dungarvan Enterprise Centre Company Limited By Guarantee

Waterford

€45,540

€4,668

Hospital Food Units Designated Activity Company

Limerick

€175,017

Kantoher Development Group Company Limited By Guarantee

Limerick

€23,500

€23,771

Action Community & Enterprise Company Limited By Guarantee

Dublin

€37,630

€38,758

€13,777

Limerick City Build (Regen) Limited

Limerick

€54,611

Tipperary Culinary Delights Company Limited By Guarantee

Tipperary

€20,488

U-Casadh Company Limited By Guarantee

Kilkenny

€21,000

€21,000

Irish Smart Ageing Exchange Company Limited By Guarantee

Limerick

€25,000

Kilkee Enterprise Development Company Limited By Guarantee

Clare

€15,600

Offaly Innovation And Design Centre Company Limited By Guarantee

Offaly

€23,010

€41,000

Sustainability Matters Company Ltd By Guarantee

Dublin

€23,715

€23,917

Galway City Innovation District CLG

Galway

€125,000

€25,000

€6,273

Shannon Commercial Enterprises Designated Activity Company

Clare

€94,904

 

Regional Enterprise Development Fund

Enterprise Ireland has approved funding totalling €59.5 million to 42 projects under the Regional Enterprise Development Fund. This fund supports significant collaborative regional initiatives to build on specific industry sectoral strengths and improve enterprise capability, thereby driving job creation. Under Call 1 and Call 2 of this fund, 9 Community Enterprise Centres were approved for funding in 2017 and 2018 respectively. To date over €250,000 has been paid to Community Enterprise Centres by Enterprise Ireland under this fund. Table four outlines details of payments to Community Enterprise Centres.

Table 4: Payments to Community Enterprise Centres under the Regional Enterprise Development Fund during the period 2017 to date in 2019.

Community Enterprise Centres

County

2017

2018

2019 to date

Ardee Community Development Co Ltd

Louth

€8,130

Cavan Innovation & Technology Centre Ltd (Feasibility)

Cavan

€9,625

Dublin Enterprise & Technology Centre Company Limited By Guarantee

Dublin

€8,107

Firies Community Enterprise Development Ltd (Feasibility)

Kerry

€3,275

Galway City Innovation District CLG

Galway

€5,570

Galway Technology Centre Designated Activity Company

Galway

€16,650

Leitrim County Enterprise Fund

Leitrim

€8,213

€27,733

Meath Enterprise Centre Company Company Limited By Guarantee (Feasibility)

Meath

€11,025

Monaghan County Enterprise Fund

Monaghan

€81,780

Mountmellick Development Association Company Limited By Guarantee

Laois

€64,934

Thurles Community Enterprise Centre Ltd

Tipperary

€11,600

As part of Enterprise Ireland’s regional strategy Powering the Regions and to build on the agency’s investment in this space to date, the agency has an ambition to support 10,000 co-working and incubation spaces in regional locations.

Local Enterprise Offices Data

Ceisteanna (108, 109)

Robert Troy

Ceist:

108. Deputy Robert Troy asked the Minister for Business, Enterprise and Innovation the value of fees charged by local enterprise offices to start-ups and existing micro-enterprise clients in mentoring sessions provided in one-to-one business advice clinics in each of the years 2016 to 2018 and to date in 2019, in tabular form; if there is a set fee in each LEO office; the average fee charged for a mentoring session annually; the limit of the number of sessions a start-up or micro-enterprise client can participate in during the year; and the number of sessions that took place in each year over the period in question. [46993/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Robert Troy

Ceist:

109. Deputy Robert Troy asked the Minister for Business, Enterprise and Innovation the value of all fees charged by external experts to micro-enterprises client of local enterprise offices for mentoring sessions provided on an appointment basis in each of the years 2016 to 2018 and to date in 2019, in tabular form; if there is a set fee for a mentoring session; the average fee charged for a mentoring session annually; the limit of the number of sessions a micro-enterprise client can participate in during the year; and the number of sessions that took place in each year over the period in question. [46994/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Business)

I propose to take Questions Nos. 108 and 109 together.

The network of 31 Local Enterprise Offices (LEOs), located in the Local Authorities nationwide is the ‘first-stop-shop’ for advice and guidance, financial assistance and other supports for anyone intending to start or grow a business.

The Mentor Programme is designed to match up the knowledge, skills, insights and entrepreneurial capability of experienced business practitioners with small business owners or managers who need practical and strategic one to one advice and guidance. The mentor contributes independent, informed observation and advice to aid decision making. All applications for mentor assistance are dealt with individually and are preceded by a business needs analysis to assess the key needs of the business and determine the most imperative mentoring objectives.

The following table shows the LEO Mentor expenditure for the years 2016 -2019.

Local Enterprise Office Mentor Expenditure, €, 2016, 2017, 2018 and Q1-Q3 2019

Local Enterprise Office

2016

2017

2018

1st Jan - 30th Sept 2019

Carlow

41,869

42,425

41,231

31,872

Cavan

45,917

34,500

47,306

16,942

Clare

24,590

21,742

36,360

19,735

Cork City

47,507

42,166

46,536

25,750

Cork North & West

91,200

88,394

116,664

94,572

Cork South

45,487

53,748

52,776

49,216

Donegal

17,208

22,930

28,867

27,764

Dublin City

178,109

183,405

183,303

155,859

Dublin South

65,265

57,876

68,454

53,347

Dún Laoghaire/Rathdown

60,701

51,976

43,924

26,351

Fingal

80,339

74,713

83,772

53,346

Galway

58,249

76,412

63,362

50,400

Kerry

37,728

45,005

50,159

42,691

Kildare

49,669

61,827

44,512

32,211

Kilkenny

59,924

79,094

67,483

45,214

Laois

29,676

29,743

32,062

28,132

Leitrim

34,198

33,309

31,446

19,188

Limerick

71,987

52,895

38,475

33,671

Longford

19,377

24,731

17,947

22,324

Louth

42,177

61,104

48,005

28,955

Mayo

34,326

55,221

50,121

54,769

Meath

46,687

59,454

62,812

75,461

Monaghan

26,883

22,761

22,691

19,673

Offaly

32,187

41,612

36,559

16,525

Roscommon

30,707

43,337

44,430

24,172

Sligo

85,212

112,280

85,333

47,343

Tipperary

63,426

66,814

77,468

54,660

Waterford

62,570

77,270

65,538

60,645

Westmeath

24,278

60,436

37,793

41,962

Wexford

69,366

66,059

39,659

35,290

Wicklow

70,201

58,301

53,761

40,040

TOTAL

€1,647,020

€1,801,540

€1,718,808

€1,328,078

There is no national policy that limits the number of assignments a micro-enterprise client can participate in during the year. The LEOs have the discretion to set their own policy in this area.

LEO Mentoring is recorded as Assignments and Visits. An assignment is the overall mentoring project undertaken by the client with each assignment consisting of one or more visits. The number of mentoring visits as part of an assignment is a matter for each LEO to decide in consultation with the mentor. In 2016, the number of LEO Mentoring assignments that took place was 3,018 with 12,035 assignment visits taking place that year. In 2017, this saw an increase to 4,064 and 12,303 respectively. In 2018, Mentoring Assignments increased by 44% to 5,870 while Mentoring Visits increased by 7% to 13,091. To date in 2019, there has been 4,905 Mentoring assignments and 11,236 Mentoring visits completed.

The LEO mentoring Programme has grown year on year and is an asset to businesses who need practical and strategic one to one advice and guidance. The LEOs will continue to work with the broad range of indigenous enterprises across sectors to ensure soft supports in the form of training, mentoring and targeted programmes are available to businesses and individuals who engage with the LEO network.

Local Enterprise Offices Data

Ceisteanna (110)

Robert Troy

Ceist:

110. Deputy Robert Troy asked the Minister for Business, Enterprise and Innovation the number of mentoring sessions provided to LEO clients in each of the years 2016 to 2018 and to date in 2019, in tabular form; and the annual allocation for LEO mentoring services in each year over this period and the budget 2020 allocation. [46995/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Business)

LEO Mentoring is recorded as Assignments and Visits. An assignment is the overall mentoring project undertaken by the client with each assignment consisting of one or more visits. The number of mentoring visits as part of an assignment is a matter for each LEO to decide in consultation with the mentor. The following tables detail the number of assignments and visits per LEO in the years 2016 to date 2019.

There is not a specific budget allocation for LEO mentoring. It is included in the LEOs overall Measure 2 allocation.

2016

Local Enterprise Office

No. Mentoring Assignments

No. Mentoring Visits Completed

Carlow

18

173

Cavan

91

209

Clare

9

76

Cork City

91

325

Cork North & West

214

795

Cork South

84

325

Donegal

26

47

Dublin City

202

1,685

Dublin Dun Laoghaire/Rathdown

202

626

Dublin Fingal

180

1,518

Dublin South

215

674

Galway County/City

69

117

Kerry

98

241

Kildare

94

367

Kilkenny

39

332

Laois

116

269

Leitrim

107

164

Limerick

106

372

Longford

18

100

Louth

87

217

Mayo

74

216

Meath

87

349

Monaghan

54

149

Offaly

28

190

Roscommon

96

315

Sligo

89

455

Tipperary

85

269

Waterford

151

429

Westmeath

72

218

Wexford

137

346

Wicklow

79

467

Grand Total

3,018

12,035

2017

Local Enterprise Office

No. Mentoring Assignments

No. Mentoring Visits Completed

Carlow

22

301

Cavan

91

176

Clare

7

137

Cork City

108

402

Cork North & West

209

820

Cork South

83

288

Donegal

37

75

Dublin City

305

1,181

Dublin Dun Laoghaire/Rathdown

202

662

Dublin Fingal

171

948

Dublin South

181

598

Galway County/City

82

116

Kerry

98

304

Kildare

235

438

Kilkenny

84

421

Laois

116

263

Leitrim

96

146

Limerick

120

431

Longford

22

112

Louth

126

374

Mayo

117

298

Meath

12

160

Monaghan

31

91

Offaly

124

183

Roscommon

232

373

Sligo

133

462

Tipperary

102

453

Waterford

226

582

Westmeath

347

528

Wexford

220

408

Wicklow

125

572

Grand Total

4,064

12,303

2018

Local Enterprise Office

No. Mentoring Assignments

No. Mentoring Visits Completed

Carlow

228

343

Cavan

121

222

Clare

14

162

Cork City

84

363

Cork North & West

232

892

Cork South

296

460

Donegal

93

120

Dublin City

399

1,271

Dublin Dun Laoghaire/Rathdown

178

476

Dublin Fingal

227

858

Dublin South

189

486

Galway County/City

529

584

Kerry

113

293

Kildare

409

421

Kilkenny

202

528

Laois

159

285

Leitrim

101

153

Limerick

123

327

Longford

53

77

Louth

283

443

Mayo

150

331

Meath

131

472

Monaghan

76

209

Offaly

120

263

Roscommon

287

436

Sligo

313

535

Tipperary

148

472

Waterford

193

472

Westmeath

216

367

Wexford

119

245

Wicklow

84

525

Grand Total

5,870

13,091

2019

Local Enterprise Office

No. Mentoring Assignments

No. Mentoring Visits Completed

Carlow

139

323

Cavan

74

124

Clare

21

130

Cork City

61

276

Cork North & West

196

772

Cork South

100

397

Donegal

105

126

Dublin City

268

881

Dublin Dun Laoghaire/Rathdown

140

495

Dublin Fingal

229

812

Dublin South

215

487

Galway County/City

560

564

Kerry

109

319

Kildare

329

349

Kilkenny

174

378

Laois

185

258

Leitrim

102

184

Limerick

98

212

Longford

34

97

Louth

252

341

Mayo

109

277

Meath

93

311

Monaghan

80

234

Offaly

57

103

Roscommon

274

353

Sligo

188

473

Tipperary

139

457

Waterford

191

572

Westmeath

225

370

Wexford

97

174

Wicklow

61

387

Grand Total

4,905

11,236

Local Enterprise Offices

Ceisteanna (111)

Robert Troy

Ceist:

111. Deputy Robert Troy asked the Minister for Business, Enterprise and Innovation her views on the position taken in the recent OECD report on SMEs (details supplied) regarding LEO mentoring services, that there may be greater latent demand for LEO mentoring services than supply. [46996/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Business)

As Minister for Business, Enterprise and Innovation, I regularly engage with small business owners and listen to their experiences of working within today’s enterprise community.

My Department provides, principally through our Agencies, a range of tailored supports for enterprises of all types and sizes in Ireland. Supports available included access to finance, management development, mentoring supports, business development programmes, marketing supports and trade promotion.

I want to ensure that all our indigenous enterprises have the correct supports available to assist their development into sustainable businesses for future growth.

That is why in the 2019 Budget I allocated an additional €3m to Enterprise Ireland and €5m to the Local Enterprise Offices (LEOs).  This extra funding assists our Agencies to reach more of our entrepreneurs and SMEs and provide tailored and targeted supports as applicable to the needs of businesses in their respective environs.

During the compilation of the review, the OECD met with representatives of the both Enterprise Ireland and the Local Enterprise Network to discuss their roles and were very appreciative of their enthusiasm, expertise and endeavours to support enterprise development.

The OECD report recognises that each LEO maintains its own local panel of mentors and it is this which is the main source of mentors to LEO clients. The LEO Network’s approach on a local and regional basis to the provision of mentoring expertise is monitored and, where matters arise in regard to demand, this is met through the shared use of mentors from other LEO offices together with addressing any shortfalls through the issuing of tenders for specific mentoring requirements.

Observing the remit of EI and the LEOs, there was further discussion regarding the potential to aid small businesses in the category of those having between ten and fifty employees, who are not currently exporting but who have the ability to grow and create further sustainable employment.

The OECD addressed the possibility of the Local Enterprise Office network expanding its activities beyond the range of micro-enterprise. The OECD acknowledged that the LEOs' geographical spread and their knowledge of their local environment increases their ability to respond to local demands and tailor their services to facilitate enterprise growth.

The recently received OECD Report on SME and Entrepreneurship Policy in Ireland has provided us with considerable food for thought as to how best to steer and progress the availability of supports to service the needs of an ever-changing business ecosystem.

My Department in conjunction with its agencies will be examining how to progress the recommendations to best fit the future needs of our indigenous enterprises.

Work Permits Applications

Ceisteanna (112)

Bernard Durkan

Ceist:

112. Deputy Bernard J. Durkan asked the Minister for Business, Enterprise and Innovation if consideration will be given to an application for a work permit in the case of a person (details supplied); and if she will make a statement on the matter. [47024/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Business)

The Employment Permits Section of my Department informs me that on 1 August 2019, the named employer applied for a Contract for Services Employment Permit in respect of the non-EEA national (details supplied).

On 23 October 2019, this application was refused as it did not meet the qualification criteria for a Contract for Services Employment Permit. My officials inform me that it would appear that the employer applied for the wrong permit type. 

The occupation being applied for, that of a welder, is eligible for a General Employment Permit.  A refusal to grant an employment permit does not preclude an applicant from submitting another application for an employment permit.  Such an application should comply with all of the legislative requirements for the particular employment permit type.  I have asked my officials to contact the applicant to inform them that the occupation would be eligible for a General Employment Permit and to provide information to assist with any new application.

My officials inform me that no application for an employment permit has been submitted in respect of the named individual's spouse.  If such an application is submitted, it will be considered subject to the application fulfilling all relevant criteria.

In order to assist with the application process, the Department has produced a suite of information including various checklist documents (which if followed should lead to the grant of an employment permit), a ‘User Guide' to our online application system and a comprehensive FAQ Document, which answers the most common queries received regarding employment permits.  All this information can be found in the Employment Permits section of my Department’s website at www.dbei.gov.ie

Research and Development Funding

Ceisteanna (113)

Robert Troy

Ceist:

113. Deputy Robert Troy asked the Minister for Business, Enterprise and Innovation the amount allocated separately to research and development under the MFF programmes 2007 to 2013, 2014 to 2020 and in the proposed 2021 to 2027 programme in tabular form. [47065/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Business)

The amounts allocated to the Framework Programmes for Research and Innovation by the European Commission under the Multiannual Financial Framework (MFF) 2007 to 2013, 2014 to 2020 and in the proposed 2021 to 2027 programme, are set out in the table:

Programme

Total Budget

Framework Programme 7

(2007–2013)

€50.521 billion

Horizon 2020

(2014–2020)

€77.028 billion

Horizon Europe

(2021–2027)

€94.1 billion (proposed)

The European Commission has proposed a budget of €94.1 billion for Horizon Europe for the next MFF. This amount is subject to formal approval as part of the ongoing MFF negotiations.

As of September 2019, Irish researchers and companies continue to perform strongly in competing for this funding.  They have been successful in winning over €800 million in funding from Horizon 2020 to date, already significantly more than the €627 million won during the previous framework programme, FP7.

Hospital Charges

Ceisteanna (114)

Aengus Ó Snodaigh

Ceist:

114. Deputy Aengus Ó Snodaigh asked the Minister for Health if a person (details supplied) can claim back some or all of the cost of a hip replacement surgery. [46907/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Health)

All persons ordinarily resident in the State are eligible to avail of public healthcare on the basis of either their full (medical card), or limited eligibility, status.  However, there are no arrangements for reimbursement of procedures received in a private institution in the State.

For procedures carried out in an institution, private or public, in another EU\EEA Member State a patient may apply for reimbursement under the terms of the Cross-Border Directive. Under the Cross-Border Directive a person who has received treatment in either a public or private institution of another EU\EEA Member State, may seek reimbursement of the lesser of either the cost of such treatment in the Member State where it is received, or the cost that would have applied for the treatment in the public health system of their Member State of Affiliation. 

The HSE through the National Contact Point (NCP) provides information for patients on the operation of the CBD on its website and by phone on 056 7784546.

Hospital Waiting Lists

Ceisteanna (115)

Seán Sherlock

Ceist:

115. Deputy Sean Sherlock asked the Minister for Health if a bed can be secured for a person (details supplied). [46910/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Health)

Under the Health Act 2004, the Health Service Executive (HSE) is required to manage and deliver, or arrange to be delivered on its behalf, health and personal social services. Section 6 of the HSE Governance Act 2013 bars the Minister for Health from directing the HSE to provide a treatment or a personal service to any individual or to confer eligibility on any individual.

The National Waiting List Management Policy, a standardised approach to managing scheduled care treatment for in-patient, day case and planned procedures, since January 2014, has been developed to ensure that all administrative, managerial and clinical staff follow an agreed national minimum standard for the management and administration of waiting lists for scheduled care. This policy, which has been adopted by the HSE, sets out the processes that hospitals are to implement to manage waiting lists.

In relation to the particular query raised, as this is a service matter, I have asked the HSE to respond to the Deputy directly.

Alcohol Pricing

Ceisteanna (116)

Robert Troy

Ceist:

116. Deputy Robert Troy asked the Minister for Health the status of legislation governing minimum unit pricing for the sale of alcohol; and the efforts being made to ensure this legislation is not further delayed and sale of alcohol controls are put in place as soon as possible. [46912/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Health)

The 2013 Government Decision which approved a minimum pricing regime envisaged its introduction in Northern Ireland and in this jurisdiction simultaneously. It is my intention to seek a revised Government Decision so that minimum unit pricing can be implemented as soon as possible in order to address the very significant health harms and financial costs of the way alcohol is currently consumed here.

Health Services

Ceisteanna (117)

Willie O'Dea

Ceist:

117. Deputy Willie O'Dea asked the Minister for Health if he will address matters regarding the case of persons with type 1 diabetes (details supplied); and if he will make a statement on the matter. [46913/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Health)

As this query relates to a service issue, it has been referred to the Health Service Executive for attention and direct reply. 

Medicinal Products Reimbursement

Ceisteanna (118)

Louise O'Reilly

Ceist:

118. Deputy Louise O'Reilly asked the Minister for Health the waiting time for reimbursement of payments made by patients under the cross-border healthcare directive. [46916/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Health)

The HSE is responsible for the operation of the Cross Border Directive and the management of the HSE Cross Border Directive (CBD) office is an operational matter for the HSE and I have referred the Deputies question to the HSE for direct reply as to the current position regarding waiting times for reimbursement.