Office of Public Works Data

Ceisteanna (146)

Catherine Martin

Ceist:

146. Deputy Catherine Martin asked the Minister for Public Expenditure and Reform the number of car parking spaces controlled by the Office of Public Works in Dublin 1, 2, 7 and 8; the number commercially leased; and the annual income from same. [53708/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Public)

The following table shows the number of car spaces that are currently recorded by the Office of Public Works (OPW) on State-owned properties in Dublin 1, 2, 7 and 8. 

The spaces are primarily assigned for State use and are managed and controlled by the occupants of the properties.  As such, the OPW is not directly leasing car spaces in these areas for commercial rent. 

Location

Number of Car Spaces

Dublin   1

168

Dublin   2

839

Dublin   7

523

Dublin   8

679

National Parks

Ceisteanna (147)

Catherine Martin

Ceist:

147. Deputy Catherine Martin asked the Minister for Public Expenditure and Reform the status of the draft Phoenix Park visitor experience strategic review; if his attention has been drawn to the degree of public opposition to some of the changes proposed in the document; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [53718/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Public)

The Draft Phoenix Park Visitor Experience Strategic Review is a non-statutory document, prepared by independent consultants, which examines the quality of visitor experience currently in the Phoenix Park and offers ideas on how the visitor experience can be enhanced in the future.It considers many aspects of how visitors of all kinds experience the Phoenix Park from wayfinding to environmental issues, linkages with the city to improving visitor facilities throughout the Park. The draft review received considerable attention from the public, media and elected representatives and the Commissioners of Public Works are appreciative of all those who engaged with the documentation and provided their valuable opinions and insights for consideration.

A high proportion of respondents held the view that the Park ought to be left untouched and that the essential character of the Park ought to be preserved. Such an opinion is consistent with the Phoenix Park Conservation Management Plan 2011 which sets out the guiding principles for the long term conservation vision for the Park and any proposed future conservation projects or enhancements to facilities will only be advanced with reference to these. This is to ensure that the essential historic character of the Park is maintained for the future. Additionally, only such proposals that are consistent with existing management practices and seek to support existing policy in relation to the management and operations of the Park will be considered.

I am satisfied that the Commissioners have listened carefully to what the public, local communities and other stakeholders have had to say. Their submissions will influence and inform how best the existing facilities might be enhanced or improved in the Park in the future.

The Commissioners essentially seek to enhance the Phoenix Park’s potential as one of the great parks of the world by undertaking appropriate conservation works and upgrades to facilities, such as toilets for example, to support the Park’s attractiveness. Such enhancements will be to the benefit of all users, local, national and international, and will necessarily be subject to statutory planning permission and availability of adequate funding.

Departmental Advertising Data

Ceisteanna (148)

Robert Troy

Ceist:

148. Deputy Robert Troy asked the Minister for Public Expenditure and Reform the amount spent on advertising in 2018 and to date in 2019 on Brexit; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [53749/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Public)

I wish to advise the Deputy that my Department has incurred no advertising costs in relation to Brexit during 2018 or 2019.

Public Sector Staff

Ceisteanna (149)

Colm Brophy

Ceist:

149. Deputy Colm Brophy asked the Minister for Public Expenditure and Reform if breastfeeding and lactation breaks or paid reduction in working hours for breastfeeding mothers of 104 weeks will be ensured across the public service. [53759/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Public)

As Minister for Public Expenditure and Reform, I am responsible for the non-pay terms and conditions for the Civil Service only. Other Ministers have such responsibility for the various sectors of the wider public service.

Paid breastfeeding breaks, until the child is two years old, were introduced in the Civil Service in 2006.

A copy of the relevant Circular can be found at the following link: https://circulars.gov.ie/pdf/circular/finance/2006/31.pdf

I am aware that the Government have approved the drafting of provisions extending the period in which employees would be entitled to breastfeeding breaks or a paid reduction in working hours from 26 to 104 weeks. This legislation is the responsibility of my colleague, the Minister for Justice and Equality. Any requirements in law that change the provisions for breastfeeding breaks will subsequently be implemented in the public service.

Departmental Transport

Ceisteanna (150)

Robert Troy

Ceist:

150. Deputy Robert Troy asked the Minister for Public Expenditure and Reform the number of State-owned vehicles in each of the past five years by categories, such as, electric, hybrid, diesel and petrol, in tabular form. [53780/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Public)

I wish to advise the Deputy that my Department does not have any State owned vehicles.  The information sought by the Deputy in respect of other Departments should be the subject of separate questions to the relevant Ministers.

Personal Injury Claims

Ceisteanna (151, 152)

Robert Troy

Ceist:

151. Deputy Robert Troy asked the Minister for Public Expenditure and Reform if he will publish the personal injuries pay-outs in the public buildings under his remit in each of the years 2016 to 2018 and to date in 2019. [53783/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Robert Troy

Ceist:

152. Deputy Robert Troy asked the Minister for Public Expenditure and Reform if the personal injuries pay-outs will be published for properties under the ownership of his Department in each of the years 2016 to 2018 and to date in 2019, in tabular form. [53797/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Public)

I propose to take Questions Nos. 151 and 152 together.

I wish to advise the Deputy that my Department owns no properties.  The buildings used by the Department are all under the ownership or management of the Office of Public Works.

The State Claims Agency manages third party claims for costs taken against the Department.  Information on the State Clams Agency activities and its financial statements are included in the NTMA Annual Report and Accounts.  Notwithstanding this, personal injuries pay-outs relating to buildings used by my Department for the period 2016 to 2018 are zero.  Figures for 2019 are not currently available but on the basis of accident report records are anticipated to be zero or financially insignificant.

With regard to personal injury payments made by the bodies under the aegis of my Department, I am advised that an out of court settlement of €48,915 was made by the Public Appointments Service in 2016.   I have also been advised that the Office of Public Works will respond directly to the Deputy in respect of that organisation.

Departmental Expenditure

Ceisteanna (153)

Fergus O'Dowd

Ceist:

153. Deputy Fergus O'Dowd asked the Minister for Public Expenditure and Reform the capital expenditure by his Department in County Louth and east County Meath by location and facility provided or commenced in each of the past four years; the location and purpose of each such expenditure; the new and improved services provided as a result; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [53848/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Public)

Given the nature of my Department's role, the purpose of the capital investment undertaken by the Department, and the Office of Government Procurement therein, is to deliver greater effectiveness and efficiency across the Civil and Public Service.  While all counties ultimately benefit from my Department’s reform plans by delivering a more effective Civil and Public Service, this limited capital expenditure is primarily invested in IT systems that are developed and maintained in the Department's Dublin offices.

Flood Relief Schemes Funding

Ceisteanna (154, 155)

Brendan Smith

Ceist:

154. Deputy Brendan Smith asked the Minister for Public Expenditure and Reform if additional funding will be provided to Cavan County Council in 2020 for flood alleviation measures in view of increasing problems with flooding due to heavy rainfall; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [53869/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Brendan Smith

Ceist:

155. Deputy Brendan Smith asked the Minister for Public Expenditure and Reform if additional funding will be provided to Monaghan County Council in 2020 for flood alleviation measures in view of increasing problems with flooding due to heavy rainfall; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [53870/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Public)

I propose to take Questions Nos. 154 and 155 together.

I am advised that localised flooding is a matter for the local authority in the first instance. However, it is open to local authorities to apply for funding under the Minor Works Scheme which was introduced by my Office on an administrative, non-statutory basis in 2009.

The purpose of the scheme is to provide funding to local authorities to undertake minor flood mitigation works or studies to address localised fluvial flooding and coastal protection problems within their administrative areas. The scheme generally applies where a solution can be readily identified and achieved in a short time frame. The works to be funded are carried out under local authority powers and ongoing maintenance of the completed works is the responsibility of the Council.

Under the scheme, applications are considered for projects that are estimated to cost not more than €750,000 in each instance. Funding of up to 90% of the cost is available for approved projects. Applications are assessed by the OPW having regard to the specific economic, social and environmental criteria of the scheme, including a cost benefit ratio and having regard to the availability of funding for flood risk management. Full details of this scheme are available on www.opw.ie

Funding of €500,000 has recently been approved under this scheme for Monaghan County Council to progress important flood alleviation works in Monaghan Town. The works will consist of the construction of a new culvert across the N54 and the R162 in Monaghan Town and additional flood alleviation measures for the Castle Road area which provides access to the town centre public car parks and shopping area.

The OPW also has statutory responsibility for and carries out a programme of Arterial Drainage Maintenance. These maintenance works relate to arterial drainage schemes completed by the OPW under the Arterial Drainage Acts 1945, with the primary purpose of improving the drainage of agricultural lands.

The OPW’s annual Arterial Drainage Maintenance Works Programme includes the following river catchments in the Cavan and Monaghan areas: Boyne, Inny, Blackwater and Glyde & Dee.

The Catchment Flood Risk Assessment and Management (CFRAM) Programme, the largest ever flood risk study carried out in the State, culminated with the launch on 3rd May, 2018 of 29 flood risk management plans which propose 118 new outline flood relief projects on top of the 42 major projects already completed and the 33 major schemes within the existing capital works programme of the Office of Public Works (OPW). All of these projects are to be funded under the Government's 10 year flood risk investment programme of almost €1 billion under the National Development Plan 2018 – 2027 .

As it is not possible to progress all 118 proposed new schemes at once, funding of €257 million for an initial phase of 50 flood relief projects throughout the country was also announced which would be progressed to detailed design and construction, including the five largest schemes identified in the Plans and 31 small or minor projects under €1 million which will be progressed directly by local authorities. Aside from the 5 largest schemes and the 31 small or minor projects, the remaining projects in the initial phase of implementation were selected on the basis of those projects which would provide the greatest benefit in terms of the greatest number of properties protected on a regionally.

A flood relief scheme for Cavan Town has been included in this initial phase of implementation, and Cavan County Council confirmed in May 2019 that the council would act as lead agency on the management and delivery of the proposed flood relief scheme in Cavan Town, valued at €4.44m. A project steering group has been set up comprising of members from Cavan County Council and from OPW administrative engineering and regional divisions. The OPW has also approved funding for Cavan County Council to recruit additional staff to work exclusively on progressing the flood relief scheme in County Cavan and will form part of the steering group once appointed.

OPW has set up frameworks of consultants, which Cavan County Council can also use to progress the design of the project, which will help to speed up the process to construction. Once consultants are appointed to progress the scheme, consultation with statutory and non-statutory bodies as well as the public will take place at the appropriate stages to ensure that all parties have the opportunity to input into the development of the scheme.

The next task for the steering group is to initiate the procurement of engineering design consultants and environmental consultants from the framework for such consultants, established by the OPW. It is expected that consultants will be appointed by the end Q1 2020.

While the three proposed schemes in County Monaghan, for Ballybay, Iniskeen and Monaghan town, are not in the first tranche of projects to be progressed, the OPW and Monaghan County Council will work closely to ensure that they will be commenced as soon as possible within the 10 year timeframe for the programme of investment.

School Admissions

Ceisteanna (156)

Michael McGrath

Ceist:

156. Deputy Michael McGrath asked the Minister for Education and Skills the steps being taken to ensure a child (details supplied) in County Cork receives an appropriate school place; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [53449/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Education)

The provision of education for children with special needs, including those with Autism, is an ongoing priority for Government.

Currently, almost 20% of the total Education Vote or €1.9bn is invested in supporting children with special needs.

Since 2011 investment in Special Education supports has increased by 50%, which is significantly above the 7% increase in total student numbers over the same period.

As a result the numbers of special education teachers, special needs assistants and special class and school places are at unprecedented levels.

The majority of children with Autism attend mainstream class, where they may access additional supports if required.

But some students may find it difficult to manage full-time placement in mainstream and so placement in a Special Class or Special School setting may be deemed appropriate where placement in mainstream class is not in the best interests of the child.

The NCSE has responsibility for coordinating and advising on the education provision for children nationwide and has well established structures in place for engaging with schools and parents.

Nationally, 167 new special classes opened this school year, which means there are 1,618 special classes in place, compared to 548 in 2011.

Of these 1,353 special classes cater for students diagnosed with ASD.

Provision in our 124 special schools has also increased from 6,848 placements in 2011 to 7,872 this year.

In Cork alone there are 195 special classes and 13 Special Schools providing specialist support to children with more complex special educational needs.

The NCSE has planned a further expansion of special class and school places in Cork for next year.

It is open to any school to make an application to the NCSE for the establishment of a specialised provision and where sanctioned, there is a range of supports including capital funding available to the school.

Normally, special class and school places are established with the full cooperation of the schools in areas where they are required. However there are some parts of the country where the Council has faced challenges in getting schools and their Patrons to voluntarily agree to provide special class or school places.

I know that this can cause much anguish for parents and families involved.

As Minister I have a power under Section 37A of the Education Act 1998 to direct a school to provide additional provision where all reasonable efforts have failed.

I would prefer to see schools volunteer to provide more places rather than places being secured on the back of an order or a direction from me. It is the right thing for the children in a community.

The local Special Education Needs Organisers in Cork are available to assist and advise to parents of children with special educational needs and identify available school places.

I understand that the local Special Education Needs Organiser is working with the family and will continue to be available until a suitable placement has been secured.

Summer Works Scheme Applications

Ceisteanna (157)

John Brassil

Ceist:

157. Deputy John Brassil asked the Minister for Education and Skills if an application by a school (details supplied) will be reviewed; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [53454/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Education)

I can confirm to the Deputy that the school in question has submitted an application for External Environment Projects under my Department's multi-annual Summer Works Scheme (SWS) 2020 onwards.

The Deputy may be aware that I recently announced details of the 405 schools that will receive funding in summer 2020 under the summer works programme.

Commensurate with the level of funding set aside for the Scheme, applications are being assessed on a top down basis in accordance with the prioritisation criteria outlined in the Circular accompanying the Scheme. In this regard, applications submitted for other works will be considered under future rounds of the Summer Works Scheme. Aughacala National School will be considered in this regard.

Summer Works Scheme Applications

Ceisteanna (158)

James Browne

Ceist:

158. Deputy James Browne asked the Minister for Education and Skills if a school (details supplied) can appeal the decision on its summer works scheme application; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [53458/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Education)

I can confirm to the Deputy that the school in question has submitted an application for External Environment Projects under the Summer Works Scheme (SWS) 2016.

The Deputy may be aware that I recently announced details of the schools that will receive funding in summer 2020 in respect of applications submitted for "Life Safety Systems projects".

Commensurate with the level of funding set aside for the Scheme, applications are being assessed on a top down basis in accordance with the prioritisation criteria outlined in the Circular accompanying the Scheme. In this regard, applications submitted for other works will be considered under future rounds of the Summer works Scheme. The school in question will be considered in this regard.

Summer Works Scheme Eligibility

Ceisteanna (159)

Michael Healy-Rae

Ceist:

159. Deputy Michael Healy-Rae asked the Minister for Education and Skills the reason a school (details supplied) did not qualify for funding under the summer works scheme; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [53483/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Education)

I can confirm to the Deputy that the school in question has submitted an application for External Environment Projects under my Department's multi-annual Summer Works Scheme (SWS) 2020 onwards.

The Deputy may be aware that I recently announced details of the 405 schools that will receive funding in summer 2020 under the summer works programme.

Commensurate with the level of funding set aside for the Scheme, applications are being assessed on a top down basis in accordance with the prioritisation criteria outlined in the Circular accompanying the Scheme. In this regard, applications submitted for other works will be considered under future rounds of the Summer Works Scheme.

Schools Building Projects

Ceisteanna (160)

Jan O'Sullivan

Ceist:

160. Deputy Jan O'Sullivan asked the Minister for Education and Skills when two schools (details supplied) which have been listed on the capital programme will be commenced; and the status of progress on the developments. [53484/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Education)

As the Deputy is aware, my Department continues to engage with a landowner and Kildare County Council in regard to technical considerations crucial to the delivery of the site and the commencement of architectural planning.

It is a priority for my Department to commence the architectural planning process for this site at the earliest possible stage. For the time being - given the commercially sensitive nature of site acquisitions in general, I am unable to elaborate further.

School Transport Eligibility

Ceisteanna (161)

Brendan Griffin

Ceist:

161. Deputy Brendan Griffin asked the Minister for Education and Skills if a student (details supplied) in County Kerry will be made eligible for school transport after the submission of further documentation; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [53486/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Education)

School transport is a significant operation managed by Bus Éireann on behalf of the Department.

There are currently over 117,500 children, including over 13,000 children with special educational needs, transported in over 5,000 vehicles on a daily basis to primary and post-primary schools throughout the country covering over 100 million kilometres annually. The purpose of the scheme is, having regard to available resources, to support the transport to and from school of children who reside remote from their nearest school.

In general children are eligible for school transport if they meet the distance criteria and are attending their nearest school.

In cases where the Department is satisfied that the nearest school is full, eligibility for school transport will be determined based on the distance that children reside from their next nearest school having regard to ethos and language.

Children who are eligible for school transport and who complete the application process on time are accommodated on school transport services where such services are in operation. Children who are not eligible for school transport, but who complete the application process on time, are considered for spare seats that may exist after eligible children have been facilitated; such seats are referred to as concessionary seats. Only children who are eligible for school transport and who hold valid Medical Cards are exempt from paying the annual charge.

Bus Éireann has advised that the child in question is not eligible for school transport as he is not attending his nearest school. Bus Éireann has also advised that a ticket was issued to the pupil referred to by the Deputy on a concessionary basis for the 2019/20 school year.

The family is advised to contact School Transport Section of my Department in regard to this matter.

Special Educational Needs

Ceisteanna (162)

Michael McGrath

Ceist:

162. Deputy Michael McGrath asked the Minister for Education and Skills his plans for a new second-level special school in Cork city and its environs; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [53520/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Education)

The provision of education for children with special needs is an ongoing priority for Government.

Currently, almost 20% of the total Education Vote or €1.9bn is invested in supporting children with special needs.

Since 2011 investment in Special Education supports has increased by 50%, which is significantly above the 7% increase in total student numbers over the same period.

As a result the numbers of special education teachers, special needs assistants and special class and school places are at unprecedented levels.

The majority of children with special educational needs attend mainstream class, where they may access additional supports if required.

But some students may find it difficult to manage full-time placement in mainstream and so placement in a Special Class or Special School setting may be deemed appropriate where placement in mainstream class is not in the best interests of the child.

Special Schools funded by my Department are established as special primary schools and cater for children and young persons with complex special educational needs from the age of 4 years until the end of the school year in which they reach their 18th year.

The NCSE has responsibility for coordinating and advising on the education provision for children nationwide and has well established structures in place for engaging with schools and parents.

Nationally, 167 new special classes opened this school year, which means there are 1,618 special classes in place, compared to 548 in 2011.

Of these 1,353 special classes cater for students diagnosed with ASD.

Provision in our 124 special schools has also increased from 6,848 placements in 2011 to 7,872 this year.

In Cork alone there are 195 special classes and 13 Special Schools providing specialist support to children with more complex special educational needs.

The NCSE has planned a further expansion of special class and school places in Cork for next year.

It is open to any school to make an application to the NCSE for the establishment of a specialised provision and where sanctioned, there is a range of supports including capital funding available to the school.

Normally, special class and school places are established with the full cooperation of the schools in areas where they are required. However there are some parts of the country where the Council has faced challenges in getting schools and their Patrons to voluntarily agree to provide special class or school places.

I know that this can cause much anguish for parents and families involved.

As Minister I have a power under Section 37A of the Education Act 1998 to direct a school to provide additional provision where all reasonable efforts have failed.

I would prefer to see schools volunteer to provide more places rather than places being secured on the back of an order or a direction from me. It is the right thing for the children in a community.

The local Special Education Needs Organisers in Cork are available to assist and advise to parents of children with special educational needs and identify available school places.

As the matter raised by the Deputy refers to a particular area, I have arranged for the Deputy's question to be forwarded to the National Council for Special Education for their attention and direct reply.

Departmental Properties

Ceisteanna (163)

Michael McGrath

Ceist:

163. Deputy Michael McGrath asked the Minister for Education and Skills the status of the ownership of a site accommodating a school (details supplied) in County Cork; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [53521/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Education)

I can confirm that the school referred to by the Deputy forms part of two Land Registry Folios one of which is a freehold title under my ownership and the other Folio is a Leasehold title, the Leasehold of which is under my ownership. The lease duration is for a period of 999 years from 1788.

Departmental Correspondence

Ceisteanna (164)

Michael McGrath

Ceist:

164. Deputy Michael McGrath asked the Minister for Education and Skills if he will address a matter raised in correspondence (details supplied); and if he will make a statement on the matter. [53554/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Education)

Under the current legislation, the bulk of the records created by the redress bodies are legally required to be disposed of on the dissolution of the three redress bodies. Under the existing legislation (section 7(6) of the Commission to Inquire into Childcare Act 2000), it is a matter for the Commission to make such arrangements as it considers appropriate for the making of as complete a record as is practicable of its proceedings and those of its committees in relation to the custody and disposal of its documents.

Section 28 of the Residential Institutions Redress Act 2002 provides that it is a matter for the RIRB/Review Committee to determine the disposal of the documents concerning applications made to them. The confidentiality provisions of the 2002 Act require that the records relating to the personal testimony of individuals be disposed of following the dissolution of the Redress Board and Review Committee. The Board received legal advice in 2009 that Section 28(7) of the Redress Act 'contemplates only such disposal as will render all such documents unusable and the information contained in it inaccessible to anyone and that in practice the only issue for the Board and Committee is the mechanism by which this can be achieved’. In other words, disposal means the destruction of the records

It is worth looking at the operating procedures used by the investigation Committee of the Commission to Inquire into Child Abuse (attached). As you can see, the complainant and allrespondents got copies of all documentation. The Residential Institutions Redress Board have an existing protocol in place whereby people who appeared before the Board can access a copy of their file.

The provision in the Records Retention Bill that access to the records will only be possible under regulations on the expiry of the 75 year period was included, in part, to reflect concerns raised 4 years ago at the 2015 pre-legislative scrutiny by the Oireachtas Joint Committee on Education and Skills, regarding matters such as

- the right to privacy of the individuals concerned

- the expectation of confidentiality under which persons engaged with the bodies.

There is a mis-apprehension about what information could be disclosed to the Garda Síochána. While people provided their personal testimonials on a confidential basis, that information could still be disclosed by the Commission to a member of the Garda Síochána if it was thought that such disclosure was necessary in order to prevent the continuance of an act or omission constituting a serious offence.

There may also be expectations that there is a wealth of material that the Commission holds that can be made available. The documentation discovered during the course of the Commission’s work exists in several categories:

(1) by named individual or organisation who provided services to the commission;

(2) by topic to which the discovered documents relate;

(3) by name of religious congregation. The discovered documents largely consist of copies of original documents submitted to the Commission.

There are issues surrounding the use of discovered documents for a purpose other than that for which they were discovered. There would, therefore, likely be issues surrounding the ultimate public release of discovered documents.

I would hold the view that historical abuse has not been hidden away but is thoroughly documented in the Ryan Report with chapters on the history of institutions, the administration and financing of those institutions, the role of the Department of Education and Skills, and the different congregations involved in the running of those institutions. Volume III documents the demographic and social circumstances of witnesses before their admission to the institutions, their experiences and reports of abuse while in the institutions and their life following discharge from the institutions.

Finally, there is no restriction on former residents describing the abuse they suffered when resident in an institution. Section 28(6) of the 2002 Act prohibits the publication of certain details of applications to or awards made by the Redress Board. This is a necessary requirement of the “no-fault” basis under which the scheme operated. Many survivors have documented their experiences in institutions through print or other media.

The Records Retention Bill was discussed at an Education Committee meeting in November and I understand that the next step is for the Committee to write to me concerning the Bill and the views expressed at that meeting.

Rules of Procedure

School Accommodation

Ceisteanna (165)

Seán Sherlock

Ceist:

165. Deputy Sean Sherlock asked the Minister for Education and Skills if a decision not to grant temporary accommodation to a school (details supplied) will be reviewed. [53556/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Education)

I can confirm to the Deputy that my Department is assessing an application, for capital funding for additional accommodation, from the school in question. A decision will be relayed to the school authority shortly.