Wednesday, 24 November 2021

Ceisteanna (75)

Neale Richmond

Ceist:

75. Deputy Neale Richmond asked the Minister for Housing, Local Government and Heritage the number of properties (details supplied) that have applied to each local authority for planning permission in 2020 and to date in 2021; the number of these planning applications that have been granted by each local authority in 2020 and to date in 2021; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [57794/21]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Housing)

The information requested in relation to the number of change of use planning applications made to, and granted/refused by, planning authorities further to the Planning and Development (Exempted Development) (No. 2) Regulations 2019 - referred to as the Short-Term Letting Regulations - which came into effect on 1 July 2019 is outlined in the table below:

Planning Authority

No. of STL change of use planning applications received

No. of STL change of use planning permission granted

No. of STL change of use planning applications refused

Carlow

0

0

0

Cork County

21

10

3

Cork City

4

1

3

DLR

0

0

0

Dublin City

20

3

10

Fingal

0

0

0

Galway City

5

0

2

Galway County

0

0

0

Kerry

0

0

0

Kildare

0

0

0

Kilkenny

5

1

1

Laois

5

2

0

Limerick

3

0

3

Louth

0

1

0

Meath

0

0

0

Offaly

0

0

0

Sligo

3

2

1

South Dublin

0

0

0

Waterford

2

1

0

Westmeath

0

0

0

Wexford

3

0

3

Wicklow

5

2

1

Total

76

23

27

In making a decision on any planning application, a planning authority must consider matters of proper planning and sustainable development of the area, having regard to –

- the provisions of the relevant development plan,

- relevant Ministerial or Government policies and guidelines,

- the views of statutory consultees, and

- the views of members of the public.

The planning authority should also consider a number of factors when deciding on these change of use applications including, but not limited to:

- the overarching Government Housing Policy to retain/return residential properties to the long term housing market;

- making the most efficient use of existing residential housing stock;

- whether the property is situated in an area experiencing high rent inflation;

- whether there is a sufficient supply of rental properties available for longer-term rental in the area to meet local need;

- general housing demand and need in the area, including the extent of the local authority’s social housing list – (HAP or RAS tenancies);

- proliferation of short-term letting properties with planning permission in the area and the wider cumulative impacts of new applications received;

- residential amenity considerations such as noise and disturbance to neighbours;

- the nature and character of the location – for example town/rural or primarily residential/ commercial: and

- The concentration of short term letting properties in apartment developments.