Léim ar aghaidh chuig an bpríomhábhar
Gnáthamharc

Thursday, 25 Nov 2021

Written Answers Nos. 343-363

Climate Action Plan

Ceisteanna (343)

Louise O'Reilly

Ceist:

343. Deputy Louise O'Reilly asked the Minister for Health if he will provide details of the members of the climate change oversight group established in his Department; the number of times the group has met since establishment; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [58128/21]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Health)

A Climate Change Oversight Group was established in my Department in September 2021, in order to provide a coherent approach by the health sector to the climate agenda. The Group met upon its establishment and it is envisaged that it will meet 2-3 times per year, while providing a forum for engagement across the relevant business areas as appropriate.

The Oversight Group draws together expertise in relation to the range of policy and business areas, including medical expertise, which interact with the climate change agenda. These centre on the issues of public health, emergency management, active lifestyles, capital expenditure and the carbon footprint of the built environment of the health sector. Over time, and as the Oversight Group beds down, additional policy areas which interact with the climate space may be identified and the membership of the Group may be added to. The Group will also engage as appropriate with the broader health sector, including HSE and national health and research experts.

Vaccination Programme

Ceisteanna (344)

Louise O'Reilly

Ceist:

344. Deputy Louise O'Reilly asked the Minister for Health if there are plans to prioritise groups (details supplied) for vaccine booster shots; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [58129/21]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Health)

The immunisation programme in Ireland is based on the advice of the National Immunisation Advisory Committee (NIAC). The NIAC makes recommendations on vaccination policy to my Department based on the prevalence of the relevant disease in Ireland and international best practices in relation to immunisation.

On 15 November the NIAC recommended that a booster of an mRNA vaccine be offered to persons aged 16-59 years with underlying conditions, all residents in Long Term Healthcare Facilities and persons aged 50-59 years. The Chief Medical Officer has endorsed the latest NIAC recommendations and written to the HSE to request that the recommendations be operationalised as soon as possible.

The NIAC has previously recommended that a booster dose of an mRNA vaccine (irrespective of whether the primary vaccination course was of an mRNA or adenoviral vector) be offered to those aged 60 years and older and healthcare workers. The booster dose should be given after an interval of six months (or at least five months) following the last dose of any authorised Covid-19 vaccine. I have accepted this advice and the HSE has made the necessary arrangements to operationalise these recommendations with the booster rollout now underway.

The NIAC will continue to examine emerging evidence regarding booster vaccines for others in the population where there is evidence of waning immunity and reduced effectiveness and will make further recommendations if required.

Vaccination Programme

Ceisteanna (345)

Paul Murphy

Ceist:

345. Deputy Paul Murphy asked the Minister for Health if patients who are in hospital and who are unable to leave hospital to go to a vaccination centre are being offered the Covid-19 vaccine in the hospital. [58130/21]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Health)

As this is a service matter, I have asked the Health Service Executive to respond to the deputy directly, as soon as possible.

Abortion Services

Ceisteanna (346)

David Cullinane

Ceist:

346. Deputy David Cullinane asked the Minister for Health if he will address a matter raised in Seanad Éireann on 10 November 2021 by persons (details supplied) regarding travel for the termination of pregnancy as an emergency medical service; if he has consulted with the relevant officials on the matter; if he will make changes to the relevant instruments with regard to same; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [58135/21]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Health)

With the lifting of restrictions on non-essential travel under S.I. 217/2021, there is no longer any requirement for Irish residents to have a reasonable excuse to travel to a port or airport for the purposes of leaving the State. Individuals travelling from Ireland are recommended to familiarise themselves with the restrictions in place for their destination. With the evolving epidemiological situation, restrictions on travellers may vary across the EU/EEA area and travellers are advised to check the Re-Open EU website.

Hospital Waiting Lists

Ceisteanna (347)

Brendan Smith

Ceist:

347. Deputy Brendan Smith asked the Minister for Health when additional capacity will be provided at a hospital (details supplied) in view of the long waiting lists for assessment and surgery; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [58150/21]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Health)

As this is a service matter, I have asked the Health Service Executive to respond to the deputy directly, as soon as possible.

Hospital Waiting Lists

Ceisteanna (348)

Violet-Anne Wynne

Ceist:

348. Deputy Violet-Anne Wynne asked the Minister for Health if funding will be approved to alleviate the waiting lists at Temple Street and Crumlin children's hospitals, as per the request by Children's Health Ireland; if so, the timeline for a decision in relation to this funding; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [58152/21]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Health)

As part of Children’s Health Ireland’s (CHI) paediatric orthopaedic service, most scoliosis cases are treated at Crumlin and Temple Street, with Crumlin providing specialised multi-disciplinary treatment for the most complex patients. The National Orthopaedic Hospital at Cappagh provides additional capacity for the treatment of less complex orthopaedic patients, including routine scoliosis procedures. By using the capacity provided by Cappagh, CHI can free up space in order that complex orthopaedic procedures, including scoliosis spinal fusions, can be carried out centrally at CHI sites.

More specifically, additional theatre capacity at the National Orthopaedic Hospital Cappagh commenced on the 26 April 2021 for daycase surgery. CHI have advised the Department of Health that this should result in a positive impact in reducing long waiting times for general orthopaedics in addition to consequential capacity gains for scoliosis patients. In 2022 CHI are planning to undertake a range of inpatient, daycase and outpatient orthopaedic appointments in Cappagh.

Funding proposals submitted to the HSE by Children’s Health Ireland to increase capacity and activity for both orthopaedic and scoliosis patients are considered under the HSE National Service Plan 2022 and under the HSE Capital Plan. Improving access to scheduled care capacity remains a priority for me and my Department as we work to finalise next year’s Service Plan.

Improving waiting times for hospital appointments and procedures remains a commitment of this Government. For 2022 an additional allocation of €250 million, comprised of €200 million to the HSE and €50 million to the National Treatment Purchase Fund has been provided in respect of work to reduce hospital and community waiting lists. The €250 million will be used to fund additional activity in both the public and private sectors. The €50 million additional funding provided to the NTPF brings its total allocation for 2022 to €150 million, and as a consequence there will be a budget of €350 million available to support vital initiatives to improve access to acute hospitals and community health services.

In addition, my Department, the HSE and the NTPF are also working on a Multi Annual Waiting List Plan to bring waiting lists in line with Sláintecare targets over the coming years. This process will be overseen by a Ministerial Taskforce, chaired by the Secretary General of my Department and includes representatives from the HSE and National Treatment Purchase Fund. The plan will be informed by the lessons learned from the successful Vaccine Taskforce. 

Health Services

Ceisteanna (349)

Emer Higgins

Ceist:

349. Deputy Emer Higgins asked the Minister for Health if he will consider introducing measures to support women with the financial cost of hormone replacement therapy as a treatment for severe symptoms of the menopause; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [58153/21]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Health)

The Government recognises that menopause is a key health issue for women in Ireland today, and work is underway to drive progress in this area which is being driven by the Women’s Health Taskforce. The Taskforce was convened in September 2019, to improve health outcomes and health experiences for women and girls. Significant activity is currently underway to enhance the supports available to women through the menopause. Minister Donnelly announced his commitment to establish dedicated specialist menopause clinics across Ireland on the 10th of September. These clinics will form a core part of a new approach to menopause care for women in Ireland and will be supported by enhanced community and primary care supports as well as the publication of targeted and trusted sources of information for women experiencing menopause. The first phase of change will include the development of a dedicated specialist menopause clinic, in the National Maternity Hospital, Holles Street this year. The clinic will be multidisciplinary supported by GPs with a certified special interest in the area of menopause and clinical nurse/midwife specialists. In addition to seeing women who meet the clinical criteria for referral to the service, the clinical team will also provide advice and guidance to GPs in the community to support the effective management of menopausal symptoms for women closer to home within primary care. Further details on this announcement can be found here:www.gov.ie/en/press-release/bf7d4-minister-for-health-announces-a-new-approach-to-menopause-care-for-women-in-ireland/

Funding for a further three specialist menopause clinics were announced within Budget 2022.

Additional activity underway and planned in the area of menopause includes:

- GP training is a key aspect of women receiving the best care through menopause. The Irish College of GPs are active members of the Women's Health Taskforce and continue to be engaged on how women's health can be better considered within the primary care setting. Relevant activity includes the collaboration between ICGP and the British Menopause Society to develop training in menopause management, which is currently in place; a recent ICGP Women’s Health Webinar on menopause and endometriosis which was held in June 2021 and had 1567 attendees; and a GP Education course which was established in September 2021 in the area of Community Gynaecology Course which includes menopause as a topic. Funding has been provided through the Women's Health Fund to develop a 'quick reference guide' for GPs on the menopause, to support primary care provision in this area. The Minister has outlined his support for a new ICGP post of Clinical Lead for Women’s Health in General Practice, the first such post in Ireland. This is currently being progressed and will enable the development of a comprehensive life-course approach to women’s health in General Practice.

- A number of health topics relating to women's health, including menopause, have recently been updated and are now live on the HSE A-Z. This information is an important first step towards delivering enhanced information and education on menopause. A public information webinar on the menopause is scheduled for November 29th 2021. - A civil service webinar on 'Menopause at work' was held on October 18th, and further HR training to better understand the challenges and solutions for supporting women in their menopause journey within the civil service will be held on November 30th. The Healthy Workplace Framework is due to be published in the coming months. Following publication, an Implementation Group will be established with responsibility for developing an action plan. A representative from Women’s Health will be included on the Implementation Group to ensure the needs of women in the workplace are incorporated. This has particular reference to increased awareness of menopause within the workplace. In addition to the activity outlined above, menopause will continue to be a priority for the Women's Health Taskforce for 2021 and 2022. Hormone replacement therapy, and in particular the cost of hormone replacement therapy, has been highlighted by women as an area they would like further attention on. Further research is required to understand the cost and benefit of such a development. This will be considered when planning for further menopause activity to take place in 2022.

Healthcare Infrastructure Provision

Ceisteanna (350)

Róisín Shortall

Ceist:

350. Deputy Róisín Shortall asked the Minister for Health the status of the application by Children's Health Ireland for funding to increase capacity in Crumlin and Temple Street hospitals; the timescale for a decision on this application; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [58194/21]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Health)

As the Health Service Executive is responsible for the delivery of public healthcare infrastructure projects, I have asked the HSE to respond to you directly in relation to this matter.

Birth Certificates

Ceisteanna (351)

Seán Sherlock

Ceist:

351. Deputy Sean Sherlock asked the Minister for Health if he will provide a list of the current average waiting times to obtain a first-time birth certificate for a child, in each county, in tabular form; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [58209/21]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Health)

As this is a service matter, I have asked the Health Service Executive to respond to the Deputy directly, as soon as possible.

General Register Office

Ceisteanna (352)

Seán Sherlock

Ceist:

352. Deputy Sean Sherlock asked the Minister for Health the nature of the contractual relationship between organisations (details supplied) and the HSE. [58210/21]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Health)

The General Register Office (Oifig An Ard-Chláraitheora) is the central civil repository for records relating to births, stillbirths, deaths, marriages, civil partnerships and adoptions in Ireland.

The General Register Office (GRO) operates under the aegis of the Department of Social Protection and has responsibility for the administration of the Civil Registration Service in Ireland.

As the Deputy's question relates civil registration services, he should redirect his question to the Minister for Social Protection for reply.

Hospital Services

Ceisteanna (353)

Róisín Shortall

Ceist:

353. Deputy Róisín Shortall asked the Minister for Health if his attention has been drawn to a development proposal by the National Orthopaedic Hospital, Cappagh for greatly expanded paediatric services, which are estimated could be provided within a year, in view of the excessively long children's waiting lists for surgery; if he will give urgent consideration to this proposal; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [58211/21]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Health)

National Orthopaedic Hospital Cappagh is Ireland’s major centre for Elective Orthopaedic Surgery. The hospital provides the full range of Orthopaedic Services including Major Joint Replacement (ankle, hip, knee, foot, shoulder, elbow and wrist), Spinal Surgery, Primary Bone Tumour Service, Paediatric Orthopaedics and the management of Sports Injuries. Paediatric scoliosis activity represents only one of area of focus within the wider spinal surgery and paediatric orthopaedics areas.

The HSE has advised the Department of Health that Cappagh are examining a number of initiatives to increase capacity, including through workforce planning, up-grades to existing theatres, and an associated modular build. Additional bed and radiology requirements are associated with these works. Service planning and associated capital planning by Cappagh are submitted to the HSE and considered under the HSE National Service Plan 2022 and under the HSE Capital Plan.

As part of Children’s Health Ireland’s (CHI) paediatric orthopaedic service, most scoliosis cases are treated at Crumlin and Temple Street, with Crumlin providing specialised multi-disciplinary treatment for the most complex patients. The National Orthopaedic Hospital at Cappagh provides additional capacity for the treatment of less complex orthopaedic patients, including routine scoliosis procedures. By using the capacity provided by Cappagh, CHI can free up space in order that complex orthopaedic procedures, including scoliosis spinal fusions, can be carried out centrally at CHI sites. More specifically, additional theatre capacity at the National Orthopaedic Hospital Cappagh commenced on the 26 April 2021 for daycase surgery. CHI have advised the Department of Health that this should result in a positive impact in reducing long waiting times for general orthopaedics in addition to consequential capacity gains for scoliosis patients. In 2022 CHI are planning to undertake a range of inpatient, daycase and outpatient orthopaedic appointments in Cappagh.

Funding proposals submitted to the HSE by Children’s Health Ireland to further utilise capacity at Cappagh for both orthopaedic and scoliosis patients are considered under the HSE National Service Plan 2022 and under the HSE Capital Plan.

For 2022 an additional allocation of €250 million, comprised of €200 million to the HSE and €50 million to the National Treatment Purchase Fund has been provided in respect of work to reduce hospital and community waiting lists. The €250 million will be used to fund additional activity in both the public and private sectors. The €50 million additional funding provided to the NTPF brings its total allocation for 2022 to €150 million, and as a consequence there will be a budget of €350 million available to support vital initiatives to improve access to acute hospitals and community health services.

In addition, my Department, the HSE and the National Treatment Purchase Fund are also working on a Multi Annual Waiting List Plan to bring waiting lists in line with Sláintecare targets over the coming years. This process will be overseen by a Ministerial Taskforce, chaired by the Secretary General of my Department and includes representatives from the HSE and National Treatment Purchase Fund. The plan will be informed by the lessons learned from the successful Vaccine Taskforce.

Vaccination Programme

Ceisteanna (354)

Róisín Shortall

Ceist:

354. Deputy Róisín Shortall asked the Minister for Health the advice for persons in each of the priority cohorts for Covid-19 boosters regarding the way they can access the vaccines; the details in respect of the pharmacies that can provide same; and the way vaccines can be accessed given official advice does not refer to this; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [58212/21]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Health)

As this is a service matter, I have asked the Health Service Executive to respond to the deputy directly, as soon as possible.

Disabilities Assessments

Question No. 356 answered with Question No. 355.

Ceisteanna (355, 356)

Mark Ward

Ceist:

355. Deputy Mark Ward asked the Minister for Health the cost to the HSE of completing an assessment of needs privately; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [58213/21]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Mark Ward

Ceist:

356. Deputy Mark Ward asked the Minister for Health the number of assessments of needs completed privately by the HSE in each of the years 2016 to 2020 and to date in 2021, by CHO, in tabular form [58214/21]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Health)

I propose to take Questions Nos. 355 and 356 together.

As these are service matters, I have asked the Health Service Executive to respond to the deputy directly, as soon as possible.

Question No. 356 answered with Question No. 355.

Vaccination Programme

Ceisteanna (357)

Róisín Shortall

Ceist:

357. Deputy Róisín Shortall asked the Minister for Health his plans to provide an information campaign for migrants in respect of the Covid-19 vaccine in view of the high numbers who have not taken the vaccine to date; the other targeted actions which he will take in this respect; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [58215/21]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Health)

As this is a service matter, I have asked the Health Service Executive to respond to the deputy directly, as soon as possible.

Disability Services

Ceisteanna (358)

Darren O'Rourke

Ceist:

358. Deputy Darren O'Rourke asked the Minister for Health the number of children who have been discharged from the Meath disability team during the transition to child development networks without having received treatment; if the decision was made to remove some children from lists for example, psychology, occupational therapy and speech and language therapy on the basis that they had not been in receipt of an intervention; the number of cases in which this occurred; the clinical basis for these decisions; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [58217/21]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Health)

As this is a service matter, I have asked the Health Service Executive to respond to the Deputy directly, as soon as possible.

Sustainable Development Goals

Ceisteanna (359)

Róisín Shortall

Ceist:

359. Deputy Róisín Shortall asked the Minister for Health if he will outline the State’s progress in respect of its targets and goals set out in Sustainable Development Goal 3 of the 2030 United Nations Agenda for Sustainable Development; if these targets and goals will to be met by their respective deadlines; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [58224/21]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Health)

The Department of Health's Statement of Strategy 2021-2023 states the Department's commitment to work with the Department of Environment, Climate and Communications and relevant partners in order to achieve the relevant Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) targets as set out in the Sustainable Development Goals National Implementation Plan 2018-2020.

Ireland’s Sustainable Development Goals National Implementation Plan, 2018-2020, sets out the Government’s ambitious response to the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and commits Ireland to fully achieving all 17 of the Goals by 2030. This Department will continue to work with the Department of Environment, Climate and Communications and relevant partners in order to achieve the relevant SDG targets, with a focus on SDG3, Good Health and Wellbeing.

In relation to the indicators under SDG3 the following, according to the 2020 CSO report, is an update on each:

SDG 3.1.1 Maternal Mortality Ratio

Over the period 1997 to 2019, the maternal death rate has varied from a high of 6.2 in 2016 to zero in 2003, 2006, 2018 and 2019.

SDG 3.1.2 Proportion of Births Attended by Skilled Health Personnel

All births in Ireland in 2015 were attended by skilled health personnel. According to the Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD) there was an estimated 18,155 midwives licensed to practice in Ireland in 2016 and 18,051 in 2017. This represented a density of 3.8 per 1,000 population. The number of midwives per 1,000 live births was 284.4 in 2016 and 292 in 2017.

SDG 3.2.1 Under-Five Mortality Rate

The mortality rate for under-fives in Ireland nearly halved between 2008 and 2018, falling from a rate of 111.2 to 64.6 per 100,000 population.

SDG 3.2.2 Neonatal Mortality Rate

The neonatal mortality rate was 2.3 in 2017. This is the number of deaths of infants (aged under 28 days) per 1,000 live births.

SDG 3.3 COVID-19 Communicable Disease

The current cases and mortality rates are for Covid-19 are available on the Covid-19 data hub.

SDG 3.3.1 Number of New HIV Infections per 1,000 Uninfected Population

There were 523 people diagnosed with HIV in Ireland 2018. Just over seven in ten of these people lived in the East region, based on the HSE area of residence. Less than 2% of people who were diagnosed with HIV lived in the Midland or North-West regions. The number of people living with HIV rose from 4,787 in 2010 to 7,529 in 2019, an increase of 57%. The number of deaths from AIDS dropped from 21 in 2011 to 14 by 2019.

SDG 3.3.2 Tuberculosis Incidence

There were 267 TB notifications in Ireland in 2019. Four in ten of these TB notifications were in the East region, (based on the HSE Area of Residence), while two in ten were in the South-East.

SDG 3.3.3 Malaria Incidence

There were 81 cases of malaria in 2019. Between 2010 and 2019 the number of cases of malaria ranged from a high of 88 in 2016 to a low of just 59 in 2018. Just over a quarter of malaria cases were aged 35-44 years in 2016, with just under a quarter aged 25-34 years.

SDG 3.3.4 Hepatitis B Incidence

The number of cases of Hepatitis B in Ireland dropped from 639 to 546 between 2010 and 2019. The rate of Hepatitis B in Ireland per 100,000 population dropped from 13.9 to 10.4 between 2010 and 2018.

SDG 3.3.5 Number of People Requiring Interventions Against Neglected Tropical Diseases

In each year between 2010 and 2015 there was either one case or zero cases of people in Ireland requiring interventions against a neglected tropical disease. In 2016, there were 20 people in Ireland who required an intervention against a neglected tropical diseases. This number dropped to 10 in 2017 and to zero in 2018.

SDG 3.4.1 Mortality Rate Attributed to Cardiovascular Disease, Cancer, Diabetes or Chronic Respiratory Disease

The standardised death rate from neoplasms per 1,000 population rose from 1.83 to 1.93 between 2010 and 2018. Over this time period, the death rate from diseases of the circulatory system fell from 2.11 to 1.88. The death rate for diseases of the respiratory system rose from 0.72 to 0.87 between 2010 and 2018, while the rate for external causes of injury and poisoning fell from 0.36 to 0.28.

SDG 3.4.2 Suicide Mortality Rate

The overall rate of suicides has reduced by 42% between 2011 and 2020 and is now below the EU average. The 2020 figure is provisional and excludes late registrations.

The Government is determined to reduce the incidence of suicide in Ireland. Last November, it extended Connecting for Life by four years to 2024. We will continue to do all we can to reduce suicide and incidents of self-harm across Ireland.

SDG 3.5.1 Coverage of Treatment Interventions (Pharmacological, Psychosocial and Rehabilitation and Aftercare Services) for Substance Use Disorders

There were 10,274 treatment interventions for substance use disorders involving drugs in 2018, a 17% increase from 8,806 in 2010.

SDG 3.5.2 Harmful Use of Alcohol, Defined According to the National Context as Alcohol per Capita Consumption (Aged 15 Years and Older) Within a Calendar Year in Litres of Pure Alcohol

Alcohol consumption in Ireland almost trebled over four decades between 1960 (4.9 litres of pure alcohol per capita) and 2000 (14.1 litres of pure alcohol per capita), as alcohol became much more affordable and more widely available. Since then, our alcohol consumption has declined by 19.6%, from a peak of 14.3 litres of pure alcohol per capita in 2001, to 11.0 litres in 2018.

SDG 3.6.1 Death Rate Due to Road Traffic Injuries

The number of deaths due to road traffic accidents fell from 192 in 2014 to 148 in 2019, a drop of 23%

SDG 3.7.2 Adolescent Birth Rate (Aged 10-14 Years; Aged 15-19 Years) per 1,000 Women in that Age Group

The number of births to women aged under 20 years fell by more than half between 2010 and 2018, falling from 2,043 to 980.

SDG 3.8.1 Coverage of Essential Health Services

- The number of medical cards rose from 1,478,560 in 2009 to 1,574,507 in 2018, an increase of 6.5%. In 2018, nearly one third (32.4%) of the population had a medical card.

- The number of GP visit cards in 2018 at 503,650 was more than four times higher than the number in 2009 of 98,325. One in ten people had a GP visit card in 2018.

- The number of people on the drugs payment scheme dropped from 1,587,448 in 2009 to 1,290,634 in 2018, a drop of 24%.

- By 2018 just over a quarter (26.6%) of the population were in the drugs payment scheme.

- There was an increase of 20% in the number of people on the long-term illness scheme between 2009 and 2018, with the numbers rising from 127,636 to 281,075.

SDG 3.8.2 Proportion of Population with Large Household Expenditures on Health

Medical expenses were 2.2% of average weekly household expenditure in Ireland in 2015, and this proportion varied from 1.9% in the Border to 2.7% in the West.

SDG 3.9.1 Mortality Rate Attributed to Household and Ambient Air Pollution

Premature deaths attributed to PM2.5, NO2 and O3 exposure are 1,100,50 and 30, respectively, in 2016.

SDG 3.9.2 Mortality Rate Attributed to Unsafe Water, Unsafe Sanitation and Lack of Hygiene

The mortality rate from unsafe water, unsafe sanitation and lack of hygiene was very low at 0.1 per 1,000 population in Ireland in 2016

SDG 3.9.3 Mortality Rate Attributed to Unintentional Poisoning

There were 274 deaths from unintentional poisoning in 2018, which gave a rate of 5.8 per 100,000 population. Seven in ten deaths from unintentional poisoning were males. Nearly half of all the deaths from unintentional poisoning were aged 25-44 years

SDG 3.a.1 Age-Standardized Prevalence of Current Tobacco Use Among Persons Aged 15 Years and Older

The prevalence of smoking fell from 23% to 17% between 2015 and 2019 among all people aged 15 and over

SDG 3.b.1 Proportion of the Target Population Covered by all Vaccines Included in Their National Programme

Detailed data available from HPSC – overall MenC2 lowest uptake 86.7% and 94.5% highest (polio, diphtheria, whooping cough)

SDG 3.b.3 Proportion of Health Facilities that have a Core Set of Relevant Essential Medicines Available and Affordable on a Sustainable Basis

Sláintecare policy

SDG 3.c.1 Health Worker Density and Distribution

The number of people employed in the public health service rose from 110,259 to 119,127 between 2016 and 2019, an increase of 8%. There were 24.2 public health service personnel per 1,000 population in 2019. The largest category of people employed in the public health service in 2019 was nursing at 31.8%, followed by other patient and client care at 21.5% and management/administration at 15.8%.

SDG 3.d.1 International Health Regulations (IHR) Capacity and Health Emergency Preparedness

In 2018, Ireland's IHR capacity was 100% (fully meets the essential public health capacity that countries are required to have) for 3 core capacities: Food Safety, Laboratory and Risk Communication. Legislation and Financing was 40% prepared for an emergency, which was the lowest score in 2018.

Sustainable Development Goals

Ceisteanna (360)

Róisín Shortall

Ceist:

360. Deputy Róisín Shortall asked the Minister for Health the impact of Covid-19 on the targets and goals set out in Sustainable Development Goal 3 of the 2030 United Nations Agenda for Sustainable Development; the steps that have been taken to mitigate against the impact of Covid-19 on Sustainable Development Goal 3; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [58226/21]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Health)

Covid-19 specifically relates to SDG3.3 and the prevention of the spread of Communicable disease. In this regard to ascertain the impact of the disease on the achievement of the target to reduce communicable disease, I refer the Deputy to the Covid-19 data hub that has been created to track the prevalence of Covid-19.

In relation to the other targets and goals under SDG3, which relate specifically to Childbirth, Communicable Disease, Premature Mortality (Non-communicable Disease), Access to Health Care, Environment (Air and Water Quality) and Health Infrastructure. The CSO provided a substantial report on all of the SDG3 targets in 2020. Without further data analysis available since the onset of the pandemic it would be pre-emptive to provide an assessment of the full impact of Covid-19 on the achievement of these goals.

Whilst Covid-19 remains a priority for my Department, the targets that are to be met under SDG3 continue to be met via existing policy areas.

Sustainable Development Goals

Ceisteanna (361)

Róisín Shortall

Ceist:

361. Deputy Róisín Shortall asked the Minister for Health if his Department has engaged with other countries in respect of Sustainable Development Goal 3 of the 2030 United Nations Agenda for Sustainable Development; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [58228/21]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Health)

The UN 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and its 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) is a significant and ambitious policy agenda that concerns all Government Departments. The first National Implementation Plan 2018-2020, published in 2018, was developed to oversee and facilitate coherent implementation of the SDGs across Government, and to promote awareness of the SDGs.

A renewed focus is currently being given to progress Ireland’s commitment to Agenda 2030 for Sustainable Development. Substantial progress has been achieved in recent months in respect of reviewing Ireland’s implementation of Agenda 2030 and identifying key priorities and actions for inclusion in the next National Implementation Plan. It is intended that the draft Plan will be made available shortly and form the basis of discussion at the next SDG National Stakeholder Forum. This will allow for a final round of input from stakeholders prior to finalisation and publication.

Ireland has adopted a ‘whole-of-Government’ approach to achieving the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), with each Minister having responsibility for implementing individual SDG targets related to their functions. My Department has responsibility for the achievement of SDG3. SDG3 itself has nine specific targets which are implemented via numerous policies within the Department, namely:

- A Healthy Weight for Ireland – Obesity Policy and Action Plan 2016-2025

- Women's Health Taskforce

- Creating A Better Future Together: National Maternity Strategy 2016-2026

- Healthy Ireland – A Framework for Improved Health and Well-being 2013-2025

- The National Sexual Health Strategy 2015-2020

- Ireland’s National Action Plan on Antimicrobial Resistance 2017-2020

- The National Cancer Strategy 2017-2026

- National Physical Activity Plan for Ireland 2016

- Connecting for Life 2015-2020 (National Suicide Strategy)

- Sharing the Vision - A Mental Health Policy for Everyone, 2020-2030.

- Reducing Harm, Supporting Recovery – a health led response to drug and alcohol use in Ireland 2017-2025

- Sláintecare

- Tobacco Free Ireland 2013-2025

There is continuous engagement across these policy areas with colleagues in other jurisdictions to inform both policy development and implementation.

Health Services

Ceisteanna (362, 367)

Martin Browne

Ceist:

362. Deputy Martin Browne asked the Minister for Health the investment by the HSE through its service level agreement with a service (details supplied) for community healthcare services in CHO 5 in each of the years 2017 to 2021, inclusive. [58237/21]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Martin Browne

Ceist:

367. Deputy Martin Browne asked the Minister for Health the number of services (details supplied) and locations that were operational across CHO 5 in each of the years 2017 to 2020 and to date in 2021, in tabular form. [58242/21]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Health)

I propose to take Questions Nos. 362 and 367 together.

As these are service matters, I have asked the Health Service Executive to respond to the Deputy directly, as soon as possible.

Health Services

Ceisteanna (363, 368)

Martin Browne

Ceist:

363. Deputy Martin Browne asked the Minister for Health the investment by the HSE through its service level agreement with a service (details supplied) for community healthcare services in CHO 3 in each of the years 2017 to 2021, inclusive. [58238/21]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Martin Browne

Ceist:

368. Deputy Martin Browne asked the Minister for Health the number of services (details supplied) and locations that were operational across CHO 3 in each of the years 2017 to 2020 and to date in 2021, in tabular form. [58243/21]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Health)

I propose to take Questions Nos. 363 and 368 together.

As these are service matters, I have asked the Health Service Executive to respond to the Deputy directly, as soon as possible.

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