Léim ar aghaidh chuig an bpríomhábhar
Gnáthamharc

Thursday, 25 Nov 2021

Written Answers Nos. 52-71

Social Welfare Benefits

Question No. 53 answered with Question No. 9.

Ceisteanna (52)

Dara Calleary

Ceist:

52. Deputy Dara Calleary asked the Minister for Social Protection the number of persons who no longer qualify for the fuel allowance due to their living circumstances changing as a result of the Covid-19 pandemic and relatives returning to live with them due to care services closing, by county, in tabular form; and if she will make a statement on the matter. [58003/21]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Social)

The Fuel Allowance is a payment of €33.00 per week for 28 weeks (a total of €924 each year) from October to April, to 369,000 low income households, at an estimated cost of €300 million in 2021. The purpose of this payment is to assist these households with their energy costs. The allowance represents a contribution towards the energy costs of a household. It is not intended to meet those costs in full. Only one allowance is paid per household.

My Department cannot and does not request fuel allowance applicants to provide reasons for changes in their household composition. Accordingly, I cannot provide the information requested by the Deputy.

A person in receipt of fuel allowance must continue to satisfy all qualifying conditions for fuel allowance to remain in payment. It is my understanding that in some of the cases referred to by the Deputy, eligibility is affected because the applicant is in receipt of an additional payment from my Department of half-rate Carer's Allowance, which is paid at a rate which is significantly higher than the rate of fuel allowance.

While my Department's schemes are kept under constant review, any review or further extension of the fuel allowance qualifying criteria can only be considered while taking account of the overall budgetary context and the availability of financial resources.

I hope this clarifies the matter for the Deputy.

Question No. 53 answered with Question No. 9.

Social Welfare Benefits

Ceisteanna (54)

Emer Higgins

Ceist:

54. Deputy Emer Higgins asked the Minister for Social Protection the status of the extension of rent supplement for victims of domestic violence. [57540/21]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Social)

Responsibility for the development and provision of services to support victims of domestic violence is a cross government body of work involving Department of Justice, Department of Housing, Local Government and Heritage, Department of Children, Equality, Disability, Integration and Youth (DCEDIY) and associated agencies. The co-ordination of the services addressing the needs of these customers is managed by The Child and Family Agency, Tusla. The accommodation needs of victims of domestic violence are met through this joined-up service delivery model provided by Tusla with the close involvement of the various housing authorities nationwide.

In August 2020, in response to the Covid-19 pandemic, I agreed to make rent supplement more accessible to victims of domestic violence. This has ensured that victims of domestic violence are not prevented from leaving their home because of financial or accommodation difficulties.

For victims of domestic violence the measure provides that the standard rent supplement means test does not apply for an initial three month period. After the initial three-month period, a further three-month extension may be provided, subject to the usual rent supplement means assessment. After six months, if the tenant has a long-term housing need, they can apply to their local housing authority for social housing supports and, if eligible, will be able to access the Housing Assistance Payment (HAP), a social housing support provided by Local Authorities.

Access to rent supplement is additional and complementary to, and not a substitution for, the range of other supports already in place for victims of domestic violence.

Following a review of the measure after twelve months of operation involving all key stakeholders, I recently announced that victims of domestic violence will be granted easier access to rent supplement on a permanent basis. This ensures that victims of domestic violence can continue to get immediate access to rent supplement for a three month period to ensure that they are not prevented from leaving their home because of financial concerns.

There are 40 victims of domestic violence currently being supported under the Protocol, with 153 cases supported since the Protocol came into operation in August 2020.

I trust this clarifies the matter for the Deputy.

Disability Services

Ceisteanna (55)

Seán Canney

Ceist:

55. Deputy Seán Canney asked the Minister for Social Protection if the added costs of living with a disability can be recognised within the social protection support system; her views on whether persons whose spouse is working can have an increased income disregard in order that they can access the disability allowance and other services which may be available as a result; and if she will make a statement on the matter. [57013/21]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Social)

My Department commissioned Indecon International Consultants to carry out research into the cost of disability in Ireland. The Programme for Government commits the Government to use this research into the cost of disability to individuals and families to properly inform the direction of future policy.

This matter is significantly wider than my Department’s income support system which is why a whole-of-Government perspective must be taken. There is not a single typical ‘cost of disability’, rather there is a spectrum from low additional costs to extremely high extra costs of disability, depending on the individual circumstances of the person with a disability. Additional costs of disability go across a number of areas of expenditure including housing; equipment, aids and appliances; mobility, transport and communications; medicines; care and assistance services and additional living expenses.

The report has been received and my Department has been considering it in detail. As part of this consideration, the Department briefed and sought the views of relevant Government departments which have a role to play in the delivery of disability services and supports. This process is now complete, and I intend to submit the report to Government for consideration shortly.

Social welfare legislation provides that, for social assistance schemes, all income and capital (such as savings, investments and property other than the family home) belonging to the claimant and his or her spouse/partner, where applicable, are assessable for means assessment purposes.

The means test plays a critical role in determining whether an income need arises as a consequence of a particular contingency – such as disability, unemployment or caring.

If a claimant is married, in a civil partnership or cohabiting, the Department will assess the couple's means when carrying out a means test for a social assistance payment. This is the case even if only one of the couple is actually claiming a payment. This is not exclusive to Disability Allowance and applies to all of the Department's social assistance schemes.

Legislation provides for an income disregard in respect of spousal earnings. Where the spouse/civil partner/cohabitant is engaged in insurable employment a disregard of €20 per day applies subject to a maximum of €60 per week, and the balance is assessed at 60%. In all other cases the balance is assessed at 100%. The disregard of €20 per day only applies to insurable employment.

From June 2022 the general means disregard for recipients of Disability Allowance will increase from €2.50 to €7.60 per week. Together with the €5 increase to the personal rate of payment and €3.30 increase for qualified adults from January 2022, this will mean that a claimant living with their spouse or partner with weekly household means of up to €350.10, or a single applicant with means of up to €212.60 will be entitled to a minimum payment.

The capital assessment formula applying to Disability Allowance has also been unique in the social welfare system, in that the first €50,000 is fully disregarded; the next €10,000 assessed at €1 per thousand, the next €10,000 is assessed at €2 per thousand, with the remainder assessed at €4 per thousand.

Any changes to the means assessment criteria for Disability Allowance would need to be considered in an overall budgetary and policy context.

I trust this clarifies the matter for the Deputy.

Pensions Reform

Ceisteanna (56, 73)

Michael Moynihan

Ceist:

56. Deputy Michael Moynihan asked the Minister for Social Protection the next steps and timeline regarding the Report of the Commission on Pensions; and if she will make a statement on the matter. [58016/21]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Claire Kerrane

Ceist:

73. Deputy Claire Kerrane asked the Minister for Social Protection when she expects her Department to implement reforms to the pension system following consideration of recommendations made in the report by the Commission on Pensions; and if she will make a statement on the matter. [57829/21]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Social)

I propose to take Questions Nos. 56 and 73 together.

The Pensions Commission was established in November 2020 to examine the sustainability of the State Pension system and the Social Insurance Fund, in fulfilment of a Programme for Government commitment. The Commission was an independent body comprised of knowledgeable and experienced academics, pension experts, members of civil society and representatives of workers and employers. The Commission has completed its work and its report was published on 7th October 2021. The Commission's Report, its Technical Sub-Committee's working papers, and submissions made to the Commission are available on the Commission’s website, pensionscommission.gov.ie.

The Commission’s Report is a comprehensive report that takes account of an assessment of various analyses of population, labour force and expenditure projections; an examination of international approaches; and responses to an extensive consultation process. It has unambiguously established that the current State Pension system is not sustainable into the future and that changes are needed, and it has set out a wide range of recommendations in this regard.

The report has been referred to the Joint Committee on Social Protection, Community and Rural Development and the Islands and to the Commission for Taxation and Welfare for their views. I understand that both the Chair of the Commission, Ms. Josephine Feehily and the Chair of its Technical Sub-Committee, Ms. Roma Burke met with the Joint Committee on 17th November 2021. Officials from my Department also attended this meeting.

In the interests both of older people and of future generations of older people, the Government intends to consider the comprehensive and far reaching recommendations in the Commission’s Report very carefully and holistically. My officials will work over the coming months to examine each of the recommendations. They will consult across Government through the Cabinet Committee system. I think it is really important that we complete that work before reaching conclusions. I intend to bring a recommended response and implementation plan to Government by the end of March 2022.

The State Pension is the bedrock of the pension system in Ireland. It is extremely effective at ensuring that our pensioners do not experience poverty. This Government is committed to ensuring that this remains the case for current pensioners, those nearing State Pension age and today’s young workers including those who are only starting their careers.

I hope this clarifies the matter for the Deputies.

Public Procurement Contracts

Ceisteanna (57)

Dara Calleary

Ceist:

57. Deputy Dara Calleary asked the Minister for Social Protection the strategy for the procurement of public employment services; and if she will make a statement on the matter. [58002/21]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Social)

The current procurement of public employment services follows extensive consultations by my Department with the existing service providers and employee representatives over the last number of years. On November 9th, my Department hosted a webinar for over 150 people with an interest in tendering for the ongoing procurement of employment services at which questions were taken for over an hour following a presentation which provided detailed information on public employment services procurement.

The Regional Employment Service model used for phase one was the product of extensive stakeholder engagement and the input of external consultants. It is fully in line with the recently published Pathways to Work 2021-2025 strategy.

Phase One of the process is focused on the procurement of a Regional Employment Service in seven counties (Donegal, Sligo-Leitrim, Longford-Westmeath and Laois-Offaly) which are currently without a local employment service. This process is at an advanced stage. The second phase of procurement which is currently under preparation will see the Regional Employment Service expanded throughout 19 further counties.

My officials will continue the ongoing dialogue with the stakeholders and employee representatives and will engage further with them before finalising the Phase two procurement.

The Request for Tenders for the Regional Employment Service and the National Employment Service will be issued before year end, with an approximate deadline of March for tenderers. It is intended that the services will be in place from July 2022.

Departmental Reviews

Ceisteanna (58)

Claire Kerrane

Ceist:

58. Deputy Claire Kerrane asked the Minister for Social Protection when the Child Maintenance Review Group is due to report on its findings; and if she will make a statement on the matter. [57826/21]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Social)

Last year, the Government established a Child Maintenance Review Group to examine certain issues in relation to child maintenance in Ireland. The Group is chaired by former Circuit Court Judge Catherine Murphy and includes legal, policy and academic professionals as well as officials from my Department and the Department of Justice.

The Group's Terms of Reference are to consider and make recommendations on: (i) the current treatment of child maintenance payments in my Department; (ii) the current provisions regarding liable relatives managed by my Department; and (iii) the establishment of a Child Maintenance Agency in Ireland.

The work of the Group is well underway. To date, the Group has held eleven meetings with further meetings planned. A consultation process to facilitate feedback from stakeholder groups and members of the public in order to inform the Group's work has been undertaken. The Group's report is due to be finalised by the end of the year.

I trust this clarifies the position for the Deputy.

Social Welfare Benefits

Awaiting reply from Department.

Question No. 60 answered with Question No. 22.

Ceisteanna (59)

Seán Canney

Ceist:

59. Deputy Seán Canney asked the Minister for Social Protection if her attention has been drawn to the fact that persons living in Ireland who were previously receiving a disability living allowance from the UK are now having the mobility component of that support withdrawn; if she plans to address this difficulty for these persons; and if she will make a statement on the matter. [57014/21]

Amharc ar fhreagra
Awaiting reply from Department.
Question No. 60 answered with Question No. 22.

Social Welfare Benefits

Ceisteanna (61)

Holly Cairns

Ceist:

61. Deputy Holly Cairns asked the Minister for Social Protection her views on introducing a scheme that would cover the cost of burials and cremations for the families of deceased children. [57978/21]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Social)

The death of a child is a tragedy and the difficulties experienced by parents and families as a result cannot be overstated.

Within the social welfare system, there are a number of supports for people who suffer a bereavement involving a child. In particular, there are arrangements which allow for certain payments to continue for a period after a person dies.

If a person is in receipt of a primary social welfare payment, which includes an increase for a qualified child, the qualified child payment will continue for six weeks after the child's death.

Where an individual has been in receipt of One-Parent Family Payment and an increase for a qualified child, both payments will continue for six weeks after the death of the child.

Regarding Carer’s Allowance, payment continues for twelve weeks after the death of a child who was being cared for.

In the case of Domiciliary Care Allowance, payment continues for three months after the death of the child being cared for.

Working Family Payment and the Back to Work Family Dividend also remain in payment for up to six weeks after the death of a qualifying child. Eligibility may continue beyond those six weeks if there are other children associated with the claim.

Under the Supplementary Welfare Allowance scheme, the Department may also make an exceptional needs payment (ENP) to help meet essential, once-off expenditure which a person could not reasonably be expected to meet from their weekly income.

An application can be made under the ENP scheme for assistance with funeral and burial expenses where there is an inability to pay these costs, in part or in full, by the family of the deceased person or child, without causing hardship. In 2020, approximately 2,800 exceptional needs payments totalling €5.6 million were made in relation to funeral and burial costs.

In Budget 2020, €60,000 was allocated to the Irish Hospice Foundation, to carry out a research project into funeral poverty in Ireland, together with the wider economic impact of bereavement. This project is expected to be completed in the near future and I look forward to studying its findings.

I hope that this clarifies matters for the Deputy.

Energy Prices

Ceisteanna (62)

Aindrias Moynihan

Ceist:

62. Deputy Aindrias Moynihan asked the Minister for Social Protection the consideration she has given to an urgent review of the current electricity allowance under the household benefits package given the current rising energy costs; the engagement she has had with the Minister for Finance on carrying out a review of the current payment under the package in view of rising inflation; and if she will make a statement on the matter. [57990/21]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Social)

The Household Benefits package (HHB) comprises the electricity or gas allowance, and the free television licence. The package is generally available to people living in the State aged 66 years or over who are in receipt of a social welfare type payment or who satisfy a means test. The package is also available to some people under the age of 66, who are in receipt of certain welfare type payments.

My Department will spend approximately €265.48 million this year on HHB for over 480,000 customers. In 2021 the estimated cost of the gas and electricity element of the package is €195.31 million. The gas and electricity element is paid at a rate of €35 per month, 12 months of the year.

In light of ESRI research and the commitment to ensure that the carbon tax is progressive, the Government has committed to very significant increases in a targeted package of social protection supports in Budget 2022. These supports were selected to counteract the impact of the increased carbon tax on low income households. The specific measures are:

- An increase to the Qualified Child Payment of €2 per week for children under 12 and €3 per week for children over 12.

- An increase in the Living Alone Allowance of €3 per week.

- An increase to the Fuel Allowance of €5 per week.

- An increase in the Working Family Payment of €10 per week.

Analysis undertaken estimates that the net impact of the combined measures is progressive. Households in the bottom four income deciles will see all of the cost of the carbon tax increase offset, with the bottom three deciles being better off as a result of these measures.

This is a tangible demonstration of the Government’s commitment to protect vulnerable households from energy poverty.

The Deputy will appreciate that provision of income support is only part of the answer in terms of addressing energy costs. One of the best ways to tackle energy costs in the long term is to improve the energy efficiency of the dwelling through proper building and household insulation. This is the responsibility of the Department of Environment, Climate and Communications, the Department of Housing, Planning and Local Government and the Sustainable Energy Authority of Ireland (SEAI). The SEAI provides a range of schemes in this area including the Better Energy Homes scheme, the Better Energy Warmer Homes Scheme, the Better Energy Warmth & Wellbeing Pilot Scheme, the Deep Retrofit Pilot Scheme, Better Energy Communities and Free Energy Efficiency Upgrades (co-funded by the Irish Government and European Union and delivered by the SEAI).

Any decision to enhance the HHB package further or to increase the electricity and gas aspect of the package would have budgetary consequences and would have to be considered in the context of overall budget negotiations.

Under the Supplementary Welfare Allowance scheme, exceptional needs payments may be made to help meet an essential, once-off cost which customers are unable to meet out of their own resources, and this may include help towards the cost of utility bills. Decisions on such payments are made on a case-by-case basis.

I trust that this clarifies the matter for the Deputy.

Social Welfare Benefits

Ceisteanna (63)

Seán Canney

Ceist:

63. Deputy Seán Canney asked the Minister for Social Protection if computer and broadband costs can be properly recognised within the farm assist process (details supplied); and if she will make a statement on the matter. [57015/21]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Social)

The Farm Assist Scheme is an important income support for farmers on low incomes, enabling them to continue to farm while also receiving a State income support. This is important not just for the farmers concerned but for the rural communities in which they live and work. Under the scheme farmers can receive the equivalent of a jobseeker payment and also have access to secondary benefits and employment services. The 2021 Further Revised Estimate provides for expenditure of €61.7 million on the scheme. The scheme is currently supporting over 5,000 farmers.

The means test for Farm Assist takes account of all income sources and farm outgoings and is more generous than that under the Jobseeker's Allowance scheme. Income is assessed in different ways and certain disregards apply. At present, a specific disregard applies to payments under a number of agri-environmental schemes. The level of the disregard is €2,540, with 50% of the balance assessed as means. There are also annual disregards for dependent children. Remaining farm income and income from off-farm self-employment is then assessed at 70%.

Deductions in respect of expenses incurred in the running of a farm e.g. farm related motor expenses, electricity and phone expenses, are limited to the proportion of such costs necessarily incurred in the working of the farm, subject to a maximum of 4.5% of gross output.

Budget 2022 introduced a measure to extensively expand the list of agri-environmental schemes that attract a disregard from October 2022. This will support the Government’s climate change agenda and will act as an incentive to farmers to participate in the schemes.

Any further changes to the means test for the Farm Assist scheme would have to be considered in a budgetary context.

Public Procurement Contracts

Question No. 65 answered with Question No. 31.

Ceisteanna (64)

Seán Sherlock

Ceist:

64. Deputy Sean Sherlock asked the Minister for Social Protection the engagement her Department has had with other Departments on the public tendering process for local employment services. [50091/21]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Social)

My Department is now at an advanced stage in its first phase of procuring new employment services.

For clarity, I would like to state that my Department has sole responsibility for the functioning of public employment services both internally through my Department's Intreo service and through services contracted by the Department.

My Department has had extensive engagement with a broad range of stakeholders in relation to this procurement process, both at Ministerial and official level since 2018. There has been continual engagement with stakeholders through numerous meetings with the representative body, the ILDN, and other stakeholders.

My Department has also had continual engagement with the Department of Public Expenditure and Reform in relation to expenditure items and through the Office of Government Procurement, which operates under the aegis of that Department.

My Department also engaged with external consultants who prepared a comprehensive report on the options available to the Department is procuring employment services that were consistent with best international practices and provided value for money for taxpayers while retaining the key features of a service that can engage with the long-term unemployed and others distant from the labour market. In preparing this report the consultants engaged with a range of the Department's current service partners and academics.

Question No. 65 answered with Question No. 31.

School Meals Programme

Question No. 67 answered with Question No. 12.

Question No. 68 answered with Question No. 11.

Ceisteanna (66)

Neasa Hourigan

Ceist:

66. Deputy Neasa Hourigan asked the Minister for Social Protection her plans for the expansion of the school meals programmes, both the urban schools meals scheme and the school meals local projects scheme; and if she will make a statement on the matter. [57602/21]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Social)

The school meals programme provides funding towards the provision of food to some 1,506 schools and organisations benefitting 230,000 children. The objective of the programme is to provide regular, nutritious food to children who are unable, due to lack of good quality food, to take full advantage of the education provided to them. The programme is an important component of policies to encourage school attendance and extra educational achievement.

A budget of €65.1 million has been provided for the scheme in 2021.

The Programme provides funding towards food services for disadvantaged school children through two schemes: The urban school meals scheme and the school meals (local projects) scheme. The Urban School Meals Scheme for primary schools is operated and administered by local authorities and is part-financed by my department. 44,095 students in 301 primary schools benefit from the Urban School Meals Scheme. 188 of these schools also benefit from the local projects scheme.

The school meals (local projects) scheme provides funding towards the provision of food to schools and organisations. 214,574 students in 1,393 schools and organisations benefit from the school meals (local projects) scheme. Funding under the school meals (local projects) scheme can be provided for breakfast, snack, lunch, dinner, hot meals and afterschool clubs and is based on a maximum rate per child per day, depending on the type of meal being provided e.g. €1.40 per child per day where a cold lunch club is being provided, €1.90 per child per day where a dinner club is being provided and €2.90 per child per day where a Hot Meal club is being provided. Dinner clubs provide a hot meal, but are different from the Hot Meals clubs, in that they tend to be provided by schools with onsite cooking facilities whereas food for Hot Meals clubs is cooked offsite and either delivered hot or reheated in the school.

In recent years entry to the School Meals Scheme has been confined to DEIS schools in addition to schools identified as having levels of concentrated disadvantage that would benefit from access to the School Meals Programme.

Prior to the introduction of DEIS in 2005, all schools and organisations that were part of one of a number of Department of Education and Skills’ initiatives for disadvantaged schools were eligible to participate in the programme, which included Breaking the Cycle, Giving Children an Even Break, the Disadvantaged Area Scheme, Home School Community Liaison and the School Completion Programme. These schools and organisations have continued to remain in the scheme since the introduction of DEIS in 2005 but their level of funding has been capped at the same rate year on year to allow for the concentration of the scheme on DEIS schools.

As part of Budget 2019, funding was provided for a pilot scheme from September 2019, providing hot school meals in primary schools at a cost of €1m for 2019 and €2.5m in 2020. The pilot involved 37 schools benefitting 6,744 students for the 2019/2020 academic year and was aimed primarily at schools with no onsite cooking facilities.

In Budget 2021, I announced that an additional €5.5m would be provided to extend the provision of hot school meals to an additional 35,000 primary school children, currently receiving the cold lunch option. My Department issued invitations for expressions of interest to 705 primary schools in November 2020. A total of 281 expressions of interest were received in respect of 52,148 children.

The 35,000 places were allocated to each local authority area based on the number of children applied by local authority as a percentage of the total number. A minimum of one School for each Local Authority area was selected. Thereafter, a process of random selection was used for each area.

Budget 2022 is providing for the hot school meals to be extended from January 2022 to the 81 DEIS schools that submitted an expression of interest but were not selected in the extension to 35,000.

The 81 schools are listed in the attached tabular statement.

Participation in the scheme is entirely voluntary. Schools and organisations must reapply for funding in advance of each school year and are required to submit detailed records at the end of the school year. Applications are accepted from individual schools and organisations as well as organisations such as School Completion Programmes who apply for multiple schools. The application process for 2021/2022 is still open.

I trust this clarifies the matter for the Deputy.

Tabular Statement: The 81 DEIS Schools being invited to participate in the Hot Meals Scheme from January 2022

Identifier

Organisation Name

County

01356U

Kilnaleck Mixed National School

CAVAN

03220F

Mercy Primary School

OFFALY

03633H

Scoil Náisiúnta Bhantiarna Lourdes

WEXFORD

03928D

Mullach National School

CLARE

04809A

Scoil An Aingil Choimheadai

DONEGAL

05348S

Tahilla Community National School

KERRY

05513H

Castlepollard Mixed National School

WESTMEATH

06959G

Clonroche National School

Wexford

06998Q

St Patrick's National School

Cavan

08143P

S N Mhuire

CAVAN

08221J

St Senans National School

Wexford

09932B

Stanhope St Convent

DUBLIN 7

11470B

Slieveardagh National School

TIPPERARY

11986N

Convent Of Mercy

WEXFORD

13271F

Fairgreen National School

CAVAN

13611D

Presentation Primary School

DUBLIN

13696O

St Vincent’s Convent National School

CORK

14704P

Murroe National School

Donegal

14873P

Dookinella National School

MAYO

15027E

S N Na Heaglaise

GALWAY

15253N

St Patrick's Girls National School

Dublin 4

15362S

S N Michil Naofa

TIPPERARY

16054M

St Patrick's National School

DONEGAL

16108J

Scoil Naomh Treasa C

DONEGAL

16202B

Castleblayney Convent National School

MONAGHAN

16713D

Scoil Na Mbraithre

Limerick

16836T

Naomh Bridhid

DONEGAL

16880W

Scoil Naomh Colmchille

Donegal

17105I

Muire Gan Smal C

Cork

17356K

Muire Na Dea Coirle Inf

DUBLIN 12

17498H

S N Naomh Sheosamh

Tipperary

17606H

Naomh Micheal N S

Westmeath

17665A

S N Gleann Guail

TIPPERARY

17737W

Our Lady Queen Of Peace School

Limerick

17743R

Naomh Muire National School

WESTMEATH

18086M

Dunfanaghy National School

Donegal

18343G

S N Chaoimhghin

TIPPERARY

18371L

Scoil Mhuire

DONEGAL

18406E

S N Phroinsiais Naofa

OFFALY

18414D

S N Gleann Beithe

KERRY

18605K

Scoil Naomh Padraig Boys

DONEGAL

18737E

Scoil Bhride

DONEGAL

18786R

Scoil Iosagain

CORK

18968A

St Malachy's B N S

DUBLIN 5

19352M

Sc Nais Realta Na Mara

WEXFORD

19438W

Scoil Colmcille Senior

Co. Dublin

19515O

Sn Naomh Treasa

Dublin

19577N

Scoil Iosa

DUBLIN 24

19582G

Tallaght C N S

Dublin

19605P

Scoil Nais Mhuire Sois

Dublin 15

19642V

St Peter Apostle Sen National School

Dublin

19662E

St Michael's National School

DUBLIN 10

19663G

St Raphael's National School

DUBLIN 10

19694R

Scoil Mhuire Sin

DUBLIN 15

19743E

St Bernadette's Junior National School

Dublin 22

19747M

Scoil Bhride National School

LAOIS

19764M

Our Lady Of Wayside National School

DUBLIN 12

19785U

St Bernadette's Senior National School

Dublin 22

19809I

Abbeycarton National School

ROSCOMMON

19830W

Corpus Christi National School

LIMERICK

19840C

Holy Family School

Co. Dublin

19909M

Gaelscoil Peig Sayers

CORK

19929S

St Brigid's Senior Girls

DUBLIN 11

19933J

Scoil Treasa Naofa

Dublin 8

19935N

Scoil Eoin

Dublin 5

19946S

Rutland National School

DUBLIN 1

19977G

Bandon Boys National School

Cork

20036J

North Presentation Primary School

CORK

20091R

St Peters National School

DUBLIN

20124G

St Mary's National School

LONGFORD

20163Q

S.N Eoin Baiste

LOUTH

20173T

St Anne's Primary School

DUBLIN 24

20219R

St Paul's B N S

WATERFORD

20220C

Gaelscoil Ui Earcain

Dublin

20275E

Scoil Íosa

MAYO

20295K

Carlow Educate Together National School

CARLOW

20303G

Lucan East Educate Together National School

DUBLIN

20389T

Scoil Maria Assumpta

Cork

20405O

St Mary's National School

Limerick

20467N

St Ailbe's National School

Tipperary

20468P

St Dominic's National School

Dublin

Question No. 67 answered with Question No. 12.
Question No. 68 answered with Question No. 11.

Covid-19 Pandemic Unemployment Payment

Question No. 70 answered with Question No. 31.

Question No. 71 answered with Question No. 29.

Ceisteanna (69)

Peadar Tóibín

Ceist:

69. Deputy Peadar Tóibín asked the Minister for Social Protection the estimated cost of the pandemic unemployment payment, since its introduction and until its projected cessation. [57982/21]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Social)

The estimated cost of the Pandemic Unemployment Payment (PUP) from its introduction in March 2020 until its cessation in February 2022 will be almost €9.1 billion. This is made up as follows:

- Actual expenditure of €4,983.7 million in 2020;

- An estimated outturn of €4,023.2 million in 2021;

- A provision of €75 million in 2022 as published in the 2022 Budget Day estimate.

In line with the Government’s Economic Recovery Plan, the PUP is gradually changing over a 6-month period to align it with standard jobseeker payments.

Question No. 70 answered with Question No. 31.
Question No. 71 answered with Question No. 29.
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