Prison Committals

Questions (576)

Mattie McGrath

Question:

576. Deputy Mattie McGrath asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the number of business persons jailed for contempt of court for each of the past five years. [8675/13]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Justice)

I wish to inform the Deputy that I have been informed by the Irish Prison Service that it is not possible to provide the information requested. However, statistics on the number of committals to prison custody as a result of contempt of court order are set out in the following table. The table covers the years from 2008 to 2011.

Year

Total

2008

20

2009

21

2010

26

2011

43

Figures for 2012 will be available upon completion of the Irish Prison Service Annual Report.

Departmental Expenditure

Questions (577)

Mattie McGrath

Question:

577. Deputy Mattie McGrath asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the costs to the State of the jailing of persons for contempt of court. [8676/13]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Justice)

The average cost of an available, staffed prison space during 2011, the latest year for which a figure is available, was €65,359 (€70,513 in 2010) a decrease on the 2010 cost of €5,154 or 7.3%. This decrease in average cost results from reduced expenditure and an increase in the provision of bed capacity.

Prison Committals

Questions (578)

Mattie McGrath

Question:

578. Deputy Mattie McGrath asked the Minister for Justice and Equality his views on the circumstances of the detention last year of a person (details supplied); and if he will make a statement on the matter. [8677/13]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Justice)

The prisoner in question was detained on a committal order made by the High Court on 12 June 2012. In such circumstances, the Deputy will appreciate that it would be entirely inappropriate for me to comment on the case.

Asylum Seeker Accommodation

Questions (579)

Thomas Pringle

Question:

579. Deputy Thomas Pringle asked the Minister for Justice and Equality further to Parliamentary Question No. 487 of 12 February 2013, if he will provide details in tabular form of those persons living in direct provision 36 months and over by year they entered direct provision. [8689/13]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Justice)

In my response to Parliamentary Question No. 487 of 12 February, 2013, I provided the Deputy with information pertaining to the numbers of residents in direct provision and their length of stay in that system. This information indicated that of 4,735 persons residing at that date in direct provision, 2,833 had been residing there for 36 months or more.

Based on updated statistics from the later date of 19 February, 2013, there are now 4,760 persons in direct provision accommodation centres under contract to the Reception and Integration Agency (RIA) of my Department. As before, the following profile shows the duration of stay of residents currently in direct provision accommodation centres but it now shows a breakdown of up to 7 years or more, a male and female resident breakdown and the percentages involved.

-

Female

Male

Total*

Months

No.

%

No.

%

No.

%

0<3

87

3.8%

147

5.9%

234

4.9%

3<6

89

3.9%

117

4.7%

206

4.3%

6<9

89

3.9%

114

4.6%

203

4.3%

9<12

108

4.7%

138

5.6%

246

5.2%

12<18

142

6.2%

160

6.5%

302

6.3%

18<24

107

4.7%

121

4.9%

228

4.8%

24<36

242

10.6%

255

10.3%

497

10.4%

36<48

253

11.1%

325

13.1%

578

12.1%

48<60

382

16.7%

378

15.3%

760

16.0%

60<72

349

15.3%

313

12.6%

662

13.9%

72<84

216

9.5%

203

8.2%

419

8.8%

84+

219

9.6%

206

8.3%

425

8.9%

Total

2283

100.0%

2477

100.0%

4760

100.0%

(*This profile is based on residents' most recent entry to the direct provision system. It does not include past time spent by residents who left the system for a period and subsequently sought and were granted re-access to the system.)

It is important to note that RIA itself has no function in determining whether someone should stay or not in its accommodation. Its function is to provide accommodation and related services to those who have sought international protection and who otherwise have no means of supporting themselves.

In essence, RIA accommodates all those who make a claim for international protection and who seek accommodation until such time as they:

(i) leave voluntarily;

(ii) are removed - either by way of deportation or Dublin II transfer;

(iii) are granted refugee status or subsidiary protection; or

(iv) are granted leave to remain, either through the process set out in the Immigration Act, 1999 or by way of special scheme such as the 2005 IBC scheme.

As I previously outlined, I acknowledge that the length of time spent in direct provision is an issue to be addressed and I have taken a number of steps to speed up the processing of applications including redeployment of resources, establishment of a legal panel to assist INIS in processing a cohort of repatriation cases. Further, I plan to republish the Immigration, Residence and Protection Bill 2010 to create a single procedure for the processing of applications. These steps will help reduce the time a person spends in direct provision while they await a final decision on their case.

As I also explained, I recently approved an initiative to put in place a panel with legal expertise who will assist INIS in processing a cohort of repatriation cases, thus speeding up the overall process and reducing the time spent by persons in the direct provision system. I would expect to see significant dividends, in terms of cases finalised, from this initiative in the coming months.

Property Services Regulation

Questions (580)

John McGuinness

Question:

580. Deputy John McGuinness asked the Minister for Justice and Equality if there is a backlog of applications from auctioneers (details supplied) to the Property Services Regulatory Authority; and his plans to increase the staff numbers on a temporary basis to clear the backlog. [8697/13]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Justice)

The Property Services Regulatory Authority was formally established on 3 April 2012 pursuant to the Property Services (Regulation) Act 2011. Under the 2011 Act, any person wishing to engage in the provision of property services must get a licence from the Authority. The types of property service for which a licence is required are: the auction of property other than land; the purchase or sale of land (including buildings or structures on land); the letting of land; and property management services. Section 99 of the 2011 Act provides that persons, who were lawfully providing a property service prior to the coming into effect of the new licensing system on 6 July 2012, could continue to provide such property services pending a determination of their licence application by the Authority.

The initial licensing process has been protracted because a very significant proportion of applications were submitted to the Authority with incomplete information or inadequate supporting documentation, requiring extensive correspondence with applicants. However, I am advised by the Authority that in the majority of cases, the applicant has been advised of a decision to either grant or refuse a licence.

My Department will be making a request to the Department of Public Expenditure and Reform for an increase in the personnel assigned to the PSRA, on receipt of a business case based on the outcome of the first licensing round. In the meantime, my Department will continue to monitor the staffing resources available to the Authority to ensure that it is in a position to fulfil its statutory responsibilities.

Citizenship Applications

Questions (581)

Peter Mathews

Question:

581. Deputy Peter Mathews asked the Minister for Justice and Equality his plans to lower the costs of citizenship for applicants who have applied for citizenship here; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [8716/13]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Justice)

The prescribed fees to be paid by applicants on the issue of a certificate of naturalisation were last increased by the Irish Nationality and Citizenship (Fees) Regulations 2008, which came into effect on 1 August 2008. The standard certification fee is €950 while a reduced fee of €200 applies in the case of an application made on behalf of a minor or in certain circumstances when the application is made by a widow, widower or surviving civil partner of an Irish citizen. In the case of refugees and stateless persons no certification fee is charged.

In November 2011, I signed into law Statutory Instrument 569/11, which introduced an application fee of €175 for new applications for a certificate of naturalisation. The application fee was introduced to contribute towards the costs of processing those applications that do not attract any certification fee and to help reduce the proportion of invalid and ineligible applications being lodged. The Statutory Instrument also introduced a series of changes to the application forms, in particular to facilitate applicants who are the civil partners of Irish citizens.

The fees are designed to reflect the effort and cost involved in processing applications for a certificate of naturalisation. As the Deputy will be aware I have introduced formal citizenship ceremonies at no extra cost to applicants. These have been universally well received by participants as the ceremonies provide a sense of occasion that serves to underscore the importance to both the State and the applicant of the granting of Irish citizenship.

I have no plans to alter either the application or certification fee at this time.

Asylum Applications

Questions (582)

Mary Lou McDonald

Question:

582. Deputy Mary Lou McDonald asked the Minister for Justice and Equality further to Parliamentary Question No. 556 of 29 January 2013, if the eight persons returned to their last port of departure from the State were Syrian nationals. [8722/13]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Justice)

I am informed that all of the eight (8) persons referred to in the response to Question No. 556 of 29 January 2013, purported to being Syrian nationals and each provided an Immigration Officer with details regarding his or her name and date of birth.

In considering whether to refuse leave to land at Ports of Entry, the Immigration Officer takes into account matters such as whether the person concerned has applied for asylum in another EU Member State and the authenticity of the documentation presented.

Penalty Points System

Questions (583)

Thomas P. Broughan

Question:

583. Deputy Thomas P. Broughan asked the Minister for Justice and Equality if he received a submission from an organisation (details supplied) dated 7 February 2013 in relation to the penalty points system and Section 63 of the 2010 Road Traffic Act; his views on the submission; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [8725/13]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Justice)

I am informed that the submission referred to by the Deputy has been received by my colleague the Minister for Transport, Tourism and Sport. In that regard, I understand the issues raised by the organisation will be considered by our respective Departments in due course.

Garda Stations Closures

Questions (584, 585, 587)

Shane Ross

Question:

584. Deputy Shane Ross asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the policing plan he has in place for the Stepaside area, if and when the closure of Stepaside Garda Station goes ahead; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [8777/13]

View answer

Shane Ross

Question:

585. Deputy Shane Ross asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the numbers of community Gardaí he intends to assign to the Stepaside area, if and when the closure of Stepaside Garda Station goes ahead; the number of Garda cars that will operate in the area; the number of additional garda cars that will be allocated to the area; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [8778/13]

View answer

Shane Ross

Question:

587. Deputy Shane Ross asked the Minister for Justice and Equality if he has decided on a date for the proposed closure of Stepaside Garda Station; his plans to notify locals in the area of this date in advance; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [8780/13]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Justice)

I propose to take Questions Nos. 584, 585 and 587 together.

The decision to close 100 Garda stations in 2013 was the result of a comprehensive operational assessment carried out by the Garda Commissioner over a 12 month period and contained in his Policing Plan 2013, which I laid before the House in November last. The Policing Plan outlines the Commissioner's proposals for the continued reorganisation and consolidation of the Garda station and district network.

It is a matter for the Garda Commissioner to make a final decision on the date of closure of Stepaside Garda Station and I have no function in that regard.

The Deputy will be aware that Stepaside is in the Blackrock District in the Dublin Metropolitan Eastern Division. It is approximately 8 km from the District Headquarters at Blackrock Garda Station and approximately 6 km from Dundrum Garda Station. As of 31 January 2013, there are 35 members of An Garda Síochána assigned to the Stepaside Garda Station. The Commissioner has indicated that these members will, insofar as possible, remain in the Blackrock District. The majority will be allocated to Dundrum Garda Station and some will be allocated to Blackrock Garda Station.

The objective of modernising and re-calibrating the Garda station network is to ensure that Garda resources are used in the best and most efficient way possible, in both rural and urban areas, to the benefit of all law-abiding people who reside in this State. The freeing up of Gardaí from desk duties in Stepaside Garda Station will increase the number of Gardaí available for frontline policing to the benefit of the community there. Nationally, revised policing arrangements will result in an additional 61,000 operational policing hours in 2013.

The implementation of the reduction in the number of Garda stations and Districts will take place in full consultation with the local communities and staffing interests. Local Garda management have engaged and will continue to engage with communities through the Joint Policing Committees and other fora to advise them of the revised policing arrangements following the closure of any particular Garda station. The objective is to ensure that the best possible policing service is provided to the public at all times.

Decisions in relation to the provision and deployment of both Garda personnel and transport are matters for the Garda Commissioner. Responsibility for the efficient deployment of official Garda vehicles in each Division is assigned to the Divisional Officer, who may allocate vehicles between stations, as required by operational circumstances. I understand, however, that of the new vehicles coming on stream, 22 of these will be allocated to the Dublin Metropolitan Region. A more detailed breakdown is not currently available and the Deputy will appreciate that a degree of flexibility in allocating and re-allocating vehicles among stations, so as to best match the allocation of resources with policing priorities, is essential to the efficient management of the Garda fleet.

The closure of any particular Garda Station will not affect the procedure for the Garda response to emergency calls which will continue as it is at present e.g. in the Dublin Metropolitan Region (which includes Stepaside) the call to 999 or 112 will initially be taken by BT, who operate the Emergency Calls Answering Service, and then, if the emergency requires An Garda Síochána, referred immediately to the Garda Command and Control Centre in Harcourt Square. The Command and Control Centre will direct the necessary Garda resources to the location of the emergency. This is done without reference to a Garda station.

In the case of an emergency requiring an urgent Garda response, such as a danger to life or risk of serious injury, a crime in progress or about to happen or an offender still at the scene or just left, members of the public should call 999 or 112. Other Crimes should be reported directly to the nearest Garda Station.

Garda Deployment

Question No. 587 answered with Question No. 584.

Questions (586)

Shane Ross

Question:

586. Deputy Shane Ross asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the costs involved in transferring both gardaí and their equipment radios, uniforms and so on, currently stationed at Stepaside Garda Station to surrounding Garda stations; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [8779/13]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Justice)

As the Deputy is aware, Stepaside Station is currently fully operational and I am informed by the Garda authorities that at this stage it is not possible to provide an accurate estimate of the costs that will be associated with transferring the relevant Garda personnel and equipment to other locations. However, the Garda authorities have also indicated that the costs involved are not expected to be significant.

Question No. 587 answered with Question No. 584.

Garda Vetting Applications

Questions (588)

Thomas P. Broughan

Question:

588. Deputy Thomas P. Broughan asked the Minister for Justice and Equality if he will explain the fee structure in relation to applications for vetting disclosures under the National Vetting Bureau (Children and Vulnerable Persons) Act 2012; if a defined fee structure is in place for applications for vetting disclosures made to the newly established National Vetting Bureau; the reason for the imposition of charges on applicants; if these charges will be fixed in the longer term; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [8814/13]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Justice)

No fees are charged at present in relation to vetting.

As the Deputy will be aware, the National Vetting Bureau (Children and Vulnerable Persons) Act 2012 was enacted in December 2012. The Act provides for the establishment of a National Vetting Bureau to take over the role currently performed by the Garda Central Vetting Unit.

Section 32 of the Act provides for the making of regulations prescribing fees for certain purposes. The section is clearly an enabling provision. I have no immediate plans for the drafting of any such regulations.

Drugs Seizures

Questions (589)

David Stanton

Question:

589. Deputy David Stanton asked the Minister for Justice and Equality if he has estimates of the amount and value of prescription drugs seized by An Garda Síochána on an annual basis and the possible sources of the prescription drugs seized; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [8822/13]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Justice)

The information requested by the Deputy is published on an annual basis in the Annual Report of An Garda Síochána, which are available at www.garda.ie.

Further to the currently available information, I am informed that provisional figures for the period 1 January to 30 June 2012 have been prepared and these are provided in the following table.

Generally speaking there are a number of ways in which prescription drugs can become available on the illegal market, including both their illegal importation into the State but also the diversion of the domestic legal supply of prescription drugs.

In tackling this illicit trade, An Garda Síochána continues to works closely with all of the relevant State agencies tasked with the enforcement of Misuse of Drugs legislation and Medicines legislation including the Revenue Customs Service and the Irish Medicines Board.

Furthermore, I can advise the Deputy that the illicit trade in prescription drugs has given rise to a recent review of our legislative provisions governing the supply of such drugs. In this regard, my Department is liaising closely with the Department of Health, who have the primary legislative responsibility in this area.

Arising from the review, proposals are currently being developed which will result in a tightening of the controls on the supply and use of these drugs, as deemed necessary, bearing in mind the need to maintain their legitimate use as appropriate.

Prescription Drug Seizures made by An Garda Síochána

2012 Quarters 1 & 2*

Drug

Grams

Tablets/Capsules

Value

Alprazolam

4,926

€9,852

Bromazepam

1

€1

Chlordiazepoxide

5

€5

Clobazam

638

€638

Clonazepam

627

€627

Diazepam

286

182,037

€182,322

Dihydrocodeine

293

€293

Flunitrazepam

1,685

€3,370

Fluoxetine

11

€11

Flurazepam

777

€1554

Lormetazepam

38

€76

Morphine

48

€48

Oxycodone

207

€207

Phenacetin

14,026

0

€14,026

Phenobarbitone

10

€10

Temazepam

81

€81

Triazolam

243

€243

Amylobarbitone

35

€35

Tramadol

10

€10

Benzocaine

499

€499

Sildenafil

93

€93

Zolpidem

192

€384

Zopiclone

3

10,059

€20,127

TOTAL

€234,512

* Information based on analysis carried out at the Forensic Science Laboratory during the period 1 January to 30 June 2012. This data is deemed to be provisional.

Garda Investigations

Questions (590)

Luke 'Ming' Flanagan

Question:

590. Deputy Luke 'Ming' Flanagan asked the Minister for Justice and Equality if an investigation by a person (details supplied) into the theft of cannabis by gardaí based at Henry Street Garda Station, County Limerick and Roxborough Garda Station, County Limerick, has resulted in a file being sent to the Director of Public Prosecutions; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [8866/13]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Justice)

I am informed that An Garda Síochána is aware of the allegations referred to which are the subject of investigation. The Deputy will appreciate that it would not be appropriate for me to comment further on the matter at this stage.

Legal Aid Service Expenditure

Questions (591)

Tony McLoughlin

Question:

591. Deputy Tony McLoughlin asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the total cost of providing free legal aid to persons who have been convicted of one or more previous convictions for the years 2011 and 2012 within the District Courts and Circuit Courts here; and the number of persons in total that availed of aid within the aforementioned categories. [8870/13]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Justice)

Total expenditure on Criminal Legal Aid for 2012 came to €50.5 million, a reduction of 10% over 2011 (€56.1million). This reduction in the annual expenditure is the largest ever recorded and represents a fall of approximately €10 million, or 16%, over the peak recorded in 2009.

Under the Criminal Justice (Legal Aid) Act, 1962, the courts, through the judiciary, are responsible for the granting of legal aid. An applicant for legal aid must establish to the satisfaction of the court that his/her means are insufficient to enable him/her to pay for legal aid him/herself. The 1962 Act specifies that the court must also be satisfied that, by reason of the "gravity of the charge" or "exceptional circumstances", it is essential in the interests of justice that the applicant should have legal aid. An applicant's previous convictions are not a criterion under the Act and the information sought by the Deputy could not be obtained without a disproportionate use of resources. Criminal prosecutions originate in the District Court and I can inform the Deputy that the District Courts granted 54,092 criminal legal aid certificates in 2011 and 49,639 in 2012. More than one certificate may be granted to any one person.

The Deputy will appreciate that an accused person who faces serious charges is entitled to a fair trial and the presumption of innocence and if he/she cannot afford to pay for legal representation there is a right to legal aid. Under the Constitution, the State is obliged to provide an accused person with the means to obtain appropriate legal representation. In addition, Article 6(3)(c) of the European Convention on Human Rights provides that every person charged with a criminal offence is entitled to defend him/herself in person or through legal assistance of his/her own choosing or, if he/she has insufficient means to pay for legal assistance, to be given it free when the interests of justice so require. The Deputy will appreciate that the criminal legal aid scheme must operate with due regard to these rights and that any unreasonable block on legal aid could give a convicted defendant an avenue for appeal or prohibition of the prosecution. My overriding concern is to ensure that no risk arises in relation to the prosecution of persons charged with criminal offences before the courts.

Garda Deployment

Questions (592)

Patrick O'Donovan

Question:

592. Deputy Patrick O'Donovan asked the Minister for Justice and Equality if Members of the Northern Ireland Executive, who travel to or through this State for official functions and transit purposes receive Garda escorts from and to the Border; if escorts are provided to Northern Ireland Executive Ministers, whether the escort costs borne by this State; if he will provide details of the escort costs for Northern Ireland Executive Members in 2012; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [8907/13]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Justice)

The Deputy will appreciate that it is not the practice, and it would be contrary to the public interest, to comment on matters of a security related nature. Operational decisions in relation to the fulfilment of protection duties are a matter for the Garda authorities.

Defence Forces Review

Questions (593)

Sandra McLellan

Question:

593. Deputy Sandra McLellan asked the Minister for Defence if he will raise the age limit for joining the Navy and Army to at least 30 years old, in view of the fact that this would give young persons who have been made redundant the opportunity to gain meaningful employment; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [8179/13]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Defence)

The 2000 White Paper on Defence and the earlier Defence Forces Review Implementation Plan both identified the requirement to address the age profile in the Defence Forces. A key element in military life is the need for personnel to maintain a level of fitness for combat readiness. This requirement must be balanced with the need to retain experience and expertise, particularly at managerial level in the Defence Forces.

The upper age limit for enlistment in the Army is under 25 years of age on the date of enlistment and for the Naval Service it is under 27 years of age on the date of enlistment. These limits are determined on the basis that the essential functions of the Permanent Defence Force requires that its members be composed of able-bodied personnel of an age which is commensurate with the functional requirements of the organisation.

The Military Authorities have advised that these upper age limits have proven suitable for the requirements for a modern Defence Forces which is actively involved in operations at home and on Peace Support Operations overseas. It is their view that an upper age limit for enlistment of 30 years of age would not be suitable to Defence Forces requirements.

I am satisfied that the existing upper age requirements for recruitment to the Permanent Defence Force are appropriate.

Ministerial Appointments

Questions (594, 595, 596)

Shane Ross

Question:

594. Deputy Shane Ross asked the Minister for Defence the details of all appointments made by him to all State agencies, commercial bodies and all other appointments made by him since taking office, including the State owned banks and the Judiciary. [8116/13]

View answer

Shane Ross

Question:

595. Deputy Shane Ross asked the Minister for Defence the details of the qualifications of all the appointees made by him to all State agencies, commercial bodies and all other appointments made by him since taking office including the State owned banks and Judiciary for the appointments they have accepted; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [8134/13]

View answer

Shane Ross

Question:

596. Deputy Shane Ross asked the Minister for Defence the number of appointees and the percentage of appointments made by him to all State agencies, commercial bodies and all other appointments made by him since taking office including the State owned banks and the Judiciary that were subject to a public applications process. [8152/13]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Defence)

I propose to take Questions Nos. 594 to 596, inclusive, together.

The Army Pensions Board is the only State Board under the aegis of my Department.

The Army Pensions Board is an independent statutory body established under the Army Pensions Act, 1927. The Act specifies that the Board shall consist of a chairman and two ordinary members. The two ordinary members must be qualified medical practitioners. The Army Pensions Act 1927 specifies that one of the ordinary members must be an officer of the Army Medical Corps. The chairman and the non-military ordinary member are appointed by the Minister for Defence with the concurrence of the Minister for Finance. The Army Medical Corps ordinary member is appointed by the Minister for Defence on the recommendation of the Chief of Staff of the Defence Forces.

The position of Army Medical Corps ordinary member became vacant due to retirement in 2011, and I appointed Commandant Adam Lagun to the Board on the recommendation of the Chief of Staff. Details of Commandant Lagun's appointment to the Army Pensions Board were published in the Iris Oifigiúil on 13 January 2012.

The Civil Defence Board was identified in the Public Service Reform Plan as a body to be abolished. I appointed an interim Board as a temporary measure from 2011 and in this context none of the positions were advertised. Legislation was passed by the Oireachtas in December 2012 for the dissolution of the Board and the transfer of its functions back to the Department of Defence.

Membership of the interim Board appointed in 2011 is set out in the following table:

Name

Nominating Bodies

Civil Defence Board Chairperson

Mr. Brian Spain

Director, Department of Defence

Nominated by Minister for Defence

Civil Defence Board Members

Mr. Cathal Duffy

Principal Officer, Department of Defence

Nominated by the Minister for Defence

Ms. Clare Tiernan

Principal Officer, Department of Defence

Nominated by the Minister for Defence

Mr. Robert Mooney

Principal Officer, Department of Defence

Nominated by the Minister for Defence

Mr. Bill Smith

Director General, Civil Defence Board

Appointed as Director General, Civil Defence Board

Mr. Ned Gleeson

County Manager, Limerick City Council

Nominated by City & County Managers Association

Mr. Keith Leonard

Assistant Fire Advisor

Nominated by the Minister for Environment, Community and Local Government

Dr. Barbara Rafferty

Nominated by Radiological Protection Institute of Ireland

Ms. Becci Cantrell

Nominated by the Environmental Protection Agency

Ms. Veronica Forde

Assistant Civil Defence Officer

Nominated by the Civil Defence Officers Association

Lt. Col. Tony Kelly

SSO, Defence Forces

Nominated by the Chief of Staff of the Defence Forces

Chief Superintendent Orla Mc Partlin

An Garda Síochána

Nominated by the Commissioner of An Garda Síochána

Mr. Fergal Conroy

Elected volunteer member of Civil Defence

Ms. Eileen Joyce

Elected staff member of the Civil Defence Board

Departmental Expenditure

Questions (597)

Thomas Pringle

Question:

597. Deputy Thomas Pringle asked the Minister for Defence if he will outline in tabular form the total cost of all conferences and seminars attended by his Department in 2012 including a breakdown of the purpose of each conference/seminar; the location; the number of delegates that attended from his Department/agencies or otherwise that were represented and the total cost of each conference/seminar; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [8301/13]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Defence)

The information requested by the Deputy is set out as follows.

Purpose of Conference/Seminar

Location

Number of Delegates

Total Cost

HR Symposium dealing with HR related issues

directed towards HR Practitioners

Shelbourne Hotel, Dublin 2

2

€350.00

International Defence & Security Conference

10 St James Square, London

1

€1,148.25

UN European Seminar on Risk Management for Civil

Protection and Disaster Management Experts.

Europaische Akademie, Berlin

1

€1,652.91

Public Procurement - Practice & Procedure

Trinity College, Dublin

3

€380.00

Crisis Support for Individuals, Families & First Responders following a mass casualty disaster

Novotel Hotel, Nottingham, UK

1

€290.76

ACCA/CIPFA Seminar - Achieving Reform for the Public Sector

IPA Training & Education Centre,

Dublin

1

€310.00

Purpose of Conference/Seminar

Location

Number of Delegates

Total Cost

RUSI Blue Lights Air Assets – UK Security in 2012 and

beyond

RUSI Building, London

1

€295.14

Dealing & Negotiating with Employee Representatives

Legal island Training Centre, Dublin

2

€653.80

Mock Employment Appeal Tribunal Hearing

South Bank House, Barrow St,

Dublin 4

1

€95.00

Workplace Mediation – solving workplace disputes

and conflict

Radisson Blu Hotel, Dublin Airport

1

€245.00

Legal Island Conference – HR Practitioners dealing

with absence from work

Radisson Blu Hotel, Dublin Airport

2

€550.00

Legal Island Conference – HR Practitioners dealing

with absence from work

Raddison Blu, Dublin Airport

2

€550.00

Workshop on Critical Incident Stress Management

NUI Maynooth

2

€70.00

Equality & Law in Ireland update 2012 – in-depth analysis of employment equality law developments

Raddison Blu, Dublin Airport

1

€455.00

Equality & Law in Ireland update 2012 – in-depth analysis of employment equality law developments

Raddison Blu, Dublin Airport

2

€950.00

The Future of HR in the Public Sector – an annual

conference on the future of HR

Western Hotel College Green, Dublin 2

1

€276.75

Annual Review of Employment Law – a comprehensive

Update of employment law

Red Cow Hotel, Dublin

2

€1,010.00

Courtroom Training Skills – a guide to being an effective

Witness in a legal forum

25 Mountjoy Square, Dublin

1

€295.00

Practical Simulation Workshop on exercising the Critical Incident Stress Management Response

NUI Maynooth

4

€105.00

Speed Reading Seminar – efficient reading techniques for increased productivity

25 Mountjoy Square, Dublin

2

€450.00

Speed Reading Seminar – efficient reading techniques for increased productivity

25 Mountjoy Square, Dublin

3

€675.00

Report Writing Seminar - efficient report writing

Techniques for increased productivity

25 Mountjoy Square, Dublin

1

€225.00

Conference on dealing with

Incident and Emergency Response Management

Irish Management Institute, Dublin 16

1

€436.65

Practical Compliance Conference in relation to Data

Protection

The Gibson Hotel, Dublin 1

2

€1,840.75

Total

€13,310.01

Defence Forces Training

Questions (598)

David Stanton

Question:

598. Deputy David Stanton asked the Minister for Defence the arrangements in place between the Defence Forces and third level institutions regarding education, training and accreditation of members of the Defence Forces; if he will provide a list of the institutions, courses and costs involved in same; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [8401/13]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Defence)

It was not possible to provide the information sought by the Deputy in the time available. My Department is currently seeking to compile an accurate reply and I will provide the information directly to the Deputy once it comes to hand.