Wednesday, 2 April 2014

Questions (83, 84, 85)

Éamon Ó Cuív

Question:

83. Deputy Éamon Ó Cuív asked the Minister for Education and Skills the number of schools built in towns with RAPID areas since the designation of DEIS 1 schools took place; the names, addresses and roll numbers of these schools; if he intends assessing these schools for acceptance into the DEIS 1 scheme; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [15515/14]

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Éamon Ó Cuív

Question:

84. Deputy Éamon Ó Cuív asked the Minister for Education and Skills if he will re-assess schools for eligibility for the DEIS 1 programme in view of the significant demographic shifts since the programme commenced; his views on whether this is needed on equality grounds; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [15516/14]

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Éamon Ó Cuív

Question:

85. Deputy Éamon Ó Cuív asked the Minister for Education and Skills the cost in 2014 of the DEIS 1 programme; if he is satisfied it is targeted at those schools most in need of the programme; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [15517/14]

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Written answers (Question to Education)

I propose to take Questions Nos. 83 to 85, inclusive, together. The process of identifying primary and post-primary schools for participation in DEIS was managed by the Educational Research Centre (ERC) on behalf of the Department and supported by quality assurance work co-ordinated through the Department's regional offices and the Inspectorate in 2005. DEIS includes a commitment to the ongoing evaluation of the programme to ensure successful implementation and best possible approaches to measuring progress and outcomes at both local and national level. Preliminary findings of the third round of longitudinal testing, published by the ERC in December 2013 in a bulletin report entitled 'Changes in Pupil Achievement in Urban Primary Schools Between 2007 and 2013' shows continuing improvements for pupils in DEIS schools in both literacy and numeracy. It is important that the gains are built upon because, while these findings are encouraging, they also show that average results in DEIS schools still fall below the national average. Accordingly, a key priority for my Department is to prioritise and target resources in schools identified as having the most concentrated levels of educational disadvantage. That challenge is significant, given the current economic climate and the target to reduce public expenditure which limits the capacity for any additionality to the DEIS programme. The estimated expenditure on the DEIS programme by my Department in 2014 is €99 million which includes funding on DEIS grants and additional teachers in DEIS schools. Additional funding is provided by the Department of Social Protection and the Department of Children and Youth Affairs for the School Meals Programme and the School Completion Programme respectively. I have no immediate plans to carry out a re-assessment of schools. The current focus of my Department in relation to the DEIS programme is on its ongoing evaluation and on distilling the learning from this research in order to inform future policy on educational disadvantage.Details of the number of schools built in towns with RAPID areas since the DEIS identification process is as follows:

County

Roll No.

School

Year

Cork

91513S

Youghal Community School, Youghal

2006

Carlow

20295K

Carlow Town Educate Together

2008

Louth

20294I

North Drogheda Environs, Drogheda

2008

Kildare

70650L

Athy Community College

2009

Galway

19858V

Gaelscoil Dara, Galway Cit

2011

Kildare

17064U

Scoil Phadraig, Ballylinan, Athy

2013

Louth

20259G

St. Francis' NS, Dundalk

2013