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State Pensions

Dáil Éireann Debate, Friday - 16 September 2016

Friday, 16 September 2016

Questions (667, 776, 820, 821)

Michael Healy-Rae

Question:

667. Deputy Michael Healy-Rae asked the Minister for Social Protection his views on correspondence (details supplied) regarding the State pension; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [24925/16]

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Róisín Shortall

Question:

776. Deputy Róisín Shortall asked the Minister for Social Protection his plans to increase the State pension by €25 over five years; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [25786/16]

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Róisín Shortall

Question:

820. Deputy Róisín Shortall asked the Minister for Social Protection the cost to the Exchequer for every 1% increase in social protection payments, with a breakdown of this cost by payment type. [26337/16]

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Róisín Shortall

Question:

821. Deputy Róisín Shortall asked the Minister for Social Protection the cost to the Exchequer for every 1% cent increase in the rate of child benefit in respect of children aged 12 years of age and over. [26340/16]

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Written answers (Question to Social)

I propose to take Questions Nos. 667, 776, 820 and 821 together.

The Programme for Government commits to increase the rate of the State Pension above the rate of inflation. The appropriate level of social welfare supports will be considered by Government in a budgetary context in the coming weeks, with due regard to available resources.

A €5 increase in the weekly rates of payment to those aged 66 and over is estimated to cost €148.8 million in 2017. A €10 increase in the weekly rates of payment to those aged 66 and over is estimated to cost €297.6 million in 2017. These costs include a proportionate increase for recipients with qualified adults and for those on reduced rates of payment. The weekly payments concerned include:

- State Pension Contributory

- Widow/er's or Surviving Civil Partner's (Con) Pension – aged 66 or over

- Deserted Wife's Benefit – aged 66 or over

- Death Benefit Pension – aged 66 or over

- State Pension Non Contributory

- Carer's Allowance – aged 66 or over

- Half Rate Carer's Allowance – aged 66 or over

The estimated cost to the Exchequer of a 1% increase in all weekly Social Protection payments is estimated at €146.74 million in 2017. The following Table details by scheme the indicative cost of a 1% increase in weekly rates of Social Protection payments. The costs include a proportionate increase for recipients with qualified adults.

Scheme

Cost in 2017

€m

Social Insurance Schemes

State Pension Contributory

46.10

Widow/er's or Surviving Civil Partner's (Con)

13.33

Death Benefit Pension

0.07

Deserted Wife's Benefit

0.69

Invalidity Pension

6.23

Guardian's Payment (Contributory)

0.10

Disablement Pension

0.68

Illness Benefit

5.44

Injury Benefit

0.13

Incapacity Supplement

0.10

Jobseeker's Benefit

3.43

Carer's Benefit

0.29

Health and Safety Benefit

0.00

Maternity & Adoptive Benefit

2.50

Social Assistance Schemes

State Pension Non Contributory

11.22

Blind Person's Pension

0.13

Widow/ers or Surviving Civil Partner's (Non-Con) Pension

0.14

Deserted Wife's Allowance

0.01

One-Parent Family Payment

3.99

Carer's Allowance

5.65

Guardian's Payment (Non-Contributory)

0.04

Jobseeker's Allowance

23.94

Pre-Retirement Allowance

0.03

Disability Allowance

13.16

Farm Assist

1.02

Back to Education Allowance

1.07

Back to Work Enterprise Allowance

1.26

Community Employment Programme

2.57

TÚS - Community Work Placement Initiative

0.98

Rural Social Scheme

0.33

JobBridge - National Internship

0.23

Gateway

0.17

Supplementary Welfare Allowance

1.71

OVERALL TOTAL

146.74

The estimated costs in 2017 of a 1% increase in the monthly rates of Child Benefit and Domiciliary Care Allowance are €20.5 million and €1.2 million respectively.

The estimated cost of a 1% increase in the rate of Child Benefit, in respect of children 12 years of age and over, is €6.3 million in 2017.

The above costings are on a full year basis and assume that, where relevant, each increase is implemented from the beginning of January. It should be noted that these costings are subject to change over the coming weeks in the context of emerging trends and associated revision of the estimated numbers of recipients for 2017.

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