Carer's Benefit Appeals

Questions (1348)

Michael Healy-Rae

Question:

1348. Deputy Michael Healy-Rae asked the Minister for Employment Affairs and Social Protection the status of a carer's benefit application by a person (details supplied); and if she will make a statement on the matter. [14218/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Employment)

I am advised by the Social Welfare Appeals Office that it is envisaged that a decision will be made by an Appeals Officer in this case within the next week. The person concerned will then be notified of the Appeals Officer’s decision.

The Social Welfare Appeals Office functions independently of the Minister for Employment Affairs and Social Protection and of the Department and is responsible for determining appeals against decisions in relation to social welfare entitlements.

I trust this clarifies the matter for the Deputy.

Working Family Payment Payments

Questions (1349)

Willie O'Dea

Question:

1349. Deputy Willie O'Dea asked the Minister for Employment Affairs and Social Protection the reason a working family payment has not issued to a person (details supplied) since October 2018; and if she will make a statement on the matter. [14231/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Employment)

Working Family Payment (WFP) is an in-work payment which provides additional income support to employees on low earnings with children. In order to qualify for WFP, an applicant must have a qualified child and be engaged in full-time paid employment as an employee for not less than 38 hours per fortnight.

Under Social Welfare Legislation, a qualified child is defined as a child under 18 years of age or aged between 18 and under 22 and in recognised full-time day education.

Working family payment for the person concerned was due for renewal from 19 July 2018. Working family payment was renewed on the basis that her son would be attending fulltime day education at a recognised college/university.

A fulltime education certificate was received on 22 October 2018, and as the person concerned did not have a qualified child as defined in legislation the working family payment claim was disallowed with effect from 24th October 2018 and correspondence issued to the person concerned.

I trust this clarifies the matter.

National Planning Framework

Questions (1350, 1351)

Michael Fitzmaurice

Question:

1350. Deputy Michael Fitzmaurice asked the Minister for Housing, Planning and Local Government the way in which he plans to meet settlement strategy objectives in unserviced rural towns and villages that are identified as settlement centres in County Galway and other county development plans; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [12860/19]

View answer

Michael Fitzmaurice

Question:

1351. Deputy Michael Fitzmaurice asked the Minister for Housing, Planning and Local Government the policy on shared communal private wastewater treatment systems for residential developments; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [12861/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Housing)

I propose to take Questions Nos. 1350 and 1351 together.

The National Planning Framework (NPF), published as part of Project Ireland 2040, sets out the Government’s overarching strategic planning approach underpinning the proper planning and sustainable development of urban and rural areas in the period to 2040, including the proper planning and sustainable development of rural towns and villages.

National Policy Objective 15 of the NPF supports the sustainable development of rural areas that have experienced low population growth or decline in recent decades. Furthermore, under National Policy Objective 18b, my Department is committed to developing a programme with local authorities, public infrastructure agencies, such as Irish Water, and local communities for the provision of serviced sites for housing to attract people to build their own homes and live in small towns and villages.

The development of such a programme must take account of lessons learned from experience with so called “Developer Provided Water Services Infrastructure” (DPI), which my Department’s National Taking in Charge Initiative (NTICI) examined and reported on. The report is available on my Department’s website at:

www.housing.gov.ie/sites/default/files/publications/files/national_taking_in_charge_initiative_report_dec2018.pdf.

I understand that Irish Water will be bringing forward proposals for a Small Towns and Villages Growth Programme which will support a number of the National Policy Objectives and National Strategic Outcomes under the NPF. The Small Towns and Villages Growth Programme is intended to provide water and wastewater growth capacity in smaller settlements which would not otherwise be provided for in Irish Water’s Investment Plan.

Irish Water is to work with Local Authorities across the country in ensuring the investment is made where it is needed most, aligned to core strategies. I understand that it is proposed that the overall national budget for this Programme by Irish Water would be allocated between counties, based on an identified need against set criteria.

Irish Water is subject to regulation by the Commission for Regulation of Utilities (CRU). The proposals from Irish Water in this regard form part of the submissions from Irish Water to the CRU on its detailed investment plans under the Irish Water Investment Plan 2020 to 2024. These submissions are currently being considered by the CRU and a decision is expected from the CRU in the second half of 2019.

The broad approach outlined in the document “Water Services Guidelines for Planning Authorities” which I published last year in draft format under Section 28 of the Planning and Development Act 2000 (as amended), is that there is effective coordination between planning authorities in their planning functions, Irish Water in its rolling capital investment programmes and local community interests.

The draft Guidelines highlight that it is the policy of Irish Water to facilitate connections to existing infrastructure, where capacity exists, in order to maximise the use of existing infrastructure and reduce additional investment costs; and that there is a general presumption that development will be focused into areas that are serviced by public water supply and wastewater collection networks with the exception of domestic systems for single dwellings. I propose to issue final Guidelines shortly.

Planning Issues

Questions (1352)

Michael McGrath

Question:

1352. Deputy Michael McGrath asked the Minister for Housing, Planning and Local Government his views on whether changes are needed to the strategic infrastructure planning process in order to prevent applicants applying for planning permission for the same project on multiple occasions in view of the difficulties faced by local communities in mounting opposition to an application on repeated occasions; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [13873/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Housing)

I do not consider that planning legislation should be amended to prevent an applicant who has been refused planning permission in respect of a particular development proposal from subsequently submitting a modified planning application, even if it could be considered somewhat similar or substantially the same as a previous planning application.

This approach is considered to be reasonable as any subsequent planning application in respect of a specific development proposal will in all probability differ in certain material respects from any previously submitted planning application that has previously been considered and refused. In addition, the circumstances relating to any particular development proposal can change over time, such as changes to national policy or the development plan for the functional area of the relevant planning authority which may impact on the policy approach to be adopted in relation to the determination of decisions on specific forms of development in the functional area concerned.

Under planning legislation, any person may make a submission or observations in respect of an individual planning application, including an application for a strategic infrastructure development (SID) proposal. When making its decision in respect of a SID planning application , or in respect of subsequent applications made in relation to the same site, An Bord Pleanála is required, in each case, to consider the proper planning and sustainable development of the area concerned; all submissions or observations received from the public and the statutory consultees; as well as the county or city development plan - or local area plan where one exists - for the area concerned.

I consider that the current arrangements provide for the right of all parties to participate in the planning process in respect of individual development proposals in an open and transparent manner and for their views to be appropriately taken into account at all stages of the process. Accordingly as indicated, I do not propose to change the current arrangements in this regard.

Urban Renewal Schemes

Questions (1353)

Brendan Ryan

Question:

1353. Deputy Brendan Ryan asked the Minister for Housing, Planning and Local Government further to Parliamentary Question No. 646 of 5 February 2019, if approval has issued to appoint a consultant to bring the proposed second bridge in Celbridge, County Kildare, from concept through to design and tender stage; the initial technical or preparatory work Kildare County Council been approved to proceed with; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [12713/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Housing)

The advancement of this project through its various stages of development is, in the first instance, a matter for Kildare County Council. The provisional funding amount of €400,000 from the Urban Regeneration and Development Fund (URDF) has been allocated to support the Council’s initial technical and preparatory work on this project.

My Department met with officials from Kildare County Council in February to discuss the details and the advancement of this and its other successful proposals, and will be writing to the Council shortly to outline the terms and conditions of URDF support.

Commercial Rates Calculations

Questions (1354)

Paul Kehoe

Question:

1354. Deputy Paul Kehoe asked the Minister for Housing, Planning and Local Government the reductions available to businesses that pay commercial rates and are owner-occupiers; the options available to persons (details supplied); and if he will make a statement on the matter. [12781/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Housing)

Local authorities are required by legislation to levy rates on any property used for commercial purposes in accordance with the details entered in the valuation lists prepared by the independent Commissioner of Valuation under the Valuation Acts 2001 to 2015. The annual rate on valuation (ARV), to be applied to the valuation of each property, is decided by the elected members of each local authority in the annual budget and is a reserved function.

Under Part 5 of the Valuation Acts 2001 to 2015, the Commissioner of Valuation is conducting a revaluation of all commercial and industrial properties throughout the State. To date, revaluations have been fully completed in respect of 16 of 31 local authority areas. The purpose of the revaluation process is to provide for more consistent and up-to-date valuations for rating purposes and to assist in providing a more equitable distribution of valuations across those liable to pay rates. The process provides for the revaluation of all rateable property within a rating authority area to reflect changes in value due to economic factors such as business turnover, differential movements in property values or other external factors and changes in the local business environment.

I understand that prior to the enactment of the Valuation Act 2001, if a property had both a commercial and domestic element, it was common practice by the Commissioner of Valuation to value it as a whole and to include a "domestic allowance" to reduce valuation in respect of the domestic area of the property. As valuation lists in local authorities are revalued, as part of the national revaluation programme, only commercial elements of properties are valued and therefore domestic allowances become obsolete.

Home Loan Scheme

Questions (1355)

James Browne

Question:

1355. Deputy James Browne asked the Minister for Housing, Planning and Local Government if a person who has exited bankruptcy may be considered a first-time buyer for the purposes of a Rebuilding Ireland mortgage application; if he is satisfied with this position; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [12809/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Housing)

Applicants for the Rebuilding Ireland Home Loan must be of good credit standing and have a satisfactory credit record. The Housing Agency provides a central credit assessment service to local authorities and credit checks are undertaken as part of the credit assessment process. The final decision on loan approval is a matter for the relevant local authority and its credit committee on a case-by-case basis. Decisions on all housing loan applications must be made in accordance with the statutory credit policy, that underpins the scheme, in order to ensure prudence and consistency in approaches in the best interests of both borrowers and the lending local authorities.

A person who has been discharged from bankruptcy and is eligible in all other respects, including being a first-time buyer, for a Rebuilding Ireland Home Loan may apply for a loan and will be subject to the same credit assessment process that applies to all applicants.

As with the previous local authority home loan offerings, the Rebuilding Ireland Home Loan is available to first time buyers only. This is to ensure the effective targeting of limited resources, and I have no plans to amend this requirement.

Home Loan Scheme

Questions (1356)

Eoin Ó Broin

Question:

1356. Deputy Eoin Ó Broin asked the Minister for Housing, Planning and Local Government if he is restricting Meath County Council from issuing Rebuilding Ireland home loans that have been assessed by the council and the Housing Agency and recommended for approval such as in the case of a person (details supplied). [12824/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Housing)

The Rebuilding Ireland Home Loan is a mortgage scheme for first-time buyers which has been available nationwide through local authorities from 1 February 2018.

When the Rebuilding Ireland Home Loan was initially being developed, it was estimated that the drawdown of loans under the scheme would be approximately €200 million over three years. The scheme has proven to be far more successful than originally anticipated, and the level of funding issued by local authorities to end January 2019 is approximately €106m, which is ahead of initial estimates for the scheme.

I am currently in discussions with the Minister for Finance, Public Expenditure and Reform regarding further funding for the scheme. Specific allocations to local authorities for 2019 will be finalised when those discussions have concluded. In the meantime, the scheme remains open and all local authorities should continue to receive and process applications.

With regards to the individual application in question, Section 63(3) of the Local Government Act 2001 provides that, subject to law, a local authority is independent in the performance of its functions. Section 6 of the Housing (Miscellaneous Provisions) Act 2009 specifically provides that the Minister's power to issue policy directions and guidelines to housing authorities in relation to their housing functions should not be construed as enabling the Minister to exercise any power or control in relation to any individual case with which a housing authority is or may be concerned. I am, therefore, precluded from intervening in relation to individual cases.

Home Loan Scheme

Questions (1357, 1393, 1411, 1414)

Eoin Ó Broin

Question:

1357. Deputy Eoin Ó Broin asked the Minister for Housing, Planning and Local Government the local authorities that have been notified that they have reached their limit in loan approvals under the initial allocation of Rebuilding Ireland home loan scheme funding; the instructions given to councils regarding pending and new applications; and when he will make an announcement on whether additional funding beyond the initial €200 million will be made available to the scheme. [12825/19]

View answer

Seán Haughey

Question:

1393. Deputy Seán Haughey asked the Minister for Housing, Planning and Local Government his plans to ensure that Dublin City Council has sufficient funding to approve applications to the Rebuilding Ireland home loan scheme in a timely manner; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [13184/19]

View answer

Mary Butler

Question:

1411. Deputy Mary Butler asked the Minister for Housing, Planning and Local Government when funding will recommence for local authorities for the Rebuilding Ireland home loan scheme. [13533/19]

View answer

Jan O'Sullivan

Question:

1414. Deputy Jan O'Sullivan asked the Minister for Housing, Planning and Local Government when the review of the Rebuilding Ireland home loan scheme will be completed; when funding for 2019 will be allocated; if he will allow flexibility for councils that have spent their budget to grant funding for applications that have already been approved; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [13629/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Housing)

I propose to take Questions Nos. 1357, 1393, 1411 and 1414 together.

The Rebuilding Ireland Home Loan scheme was launched in February 2018 to replace the existing local authority mortgage schemes, which were funded through loans that local authorities obtained from the Housing Finance Agency (HFA) for that purpose.

When the Rebuilding Ireland Home Loan was initially being developed, it was estimated that the drawdown of loans under the scheme would be approximately €200 million over three years. The scheme has proven to be far more successful than originally anticipated, and the level of funding issued by local authorities to end January 2019 is approximately €106m, which is ahead of initial estimates for the scheme.

As a result, to date, a number of local authorities have issued loans to a level which has used up their approved allocations lending for mortgage and home improvement for 2018. Based on the latest information available, these are Fingal County Council, Kildare County Council, Meath County Council, Tipperary County Council, Waterford City & County Council, Wicklow County Council and Wexford County Council. Each local authority is aware of their allocations for housing loans for 2018, and monitors the use of this accordingly.

I am currently in discussions with the Minister for Finance, Public Expenditure and Reform regarding further funding for the scheme. Specific allocations to local authorities for 2019 will be finalised when those discussions have concluded. In the meantime, the scheme remains open and all local authorities should continue to receive and process applications.

In relation to the review of the Rebuilding Ireland Home Loan that I requested be undertaken by my Department in order to assist in the on-going administration of the scheme, it is at an advanced stage and is due to be finalised shortly. In carrying out the review, the Department has consulted with a number of local authorities, the Housing Agency, and the Housing Finance Agency. The review will also have regard to the views raised by public representatives since the scheme's commencement. However, in making any recommendations in relation to the operation of the scheme, it will also take account of the need to ensure that lending issued under it is provided on a prudential basis, so as to protect the financial interests of the borrowers and the local authorities.

Vacant Sites

Questions (1358)

Róisín Shortall

Question:

1358. Deputy Róisín Shortall asked the Minister for Housing, Planning and Local Government the role of the Land Development Agency in regard to the purchasing of vacant sites and units that have the potential for significant residential development; the arrangements that exist for the purchase of such sites prior to them being placed on the open market in circumstances in which the ownership is under the control of the State or a State agency or in cases in which the State has a long-standing relationship with the owner; and the plans of the Land Development Agency in regard to a site (details supplied). [12833/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Housing)

The Land Development Agency (LDA) is focused on managing State-owned land to develop new homes, and regenerate under-utilised sites. In the longer-term it will assemble strategic land banks from a mix of public and private lands, making these available for housing in a controlled manner which brings essential long-term stability to the Irish housing market with the objective of facilitating the delivery of 150,000 new homes over the next 20 years.

Following its establishment in September 2018, the LDA has had access to an initial tranche of 8 sites that have delivery potential for 3,000 new homes. The LDA has been progressing work on the State owned lands initially identified. It is also engaging with Government Departments and Semi-State bodies in relation to assessing a number of other potential development land opportunities and on approaches to State land acquisition and development.

In general, property disposals by State bodies require the approval of the Department of Public Expenditure and Reform. The LDA works closely with that Department in order to identify suitable lands that could be vested in the LDA. Procedures are currently being developed requiring State bodies to liaise directly with the LDA; however, in practice, there is an ongoing direct dialogue between the LDA and State bodies through the course of the LDA’s business.

In accordance with a prior Government decision and the Grangegorman Development Agency Act 2005, proceeds from the sales of DIT properties will be fully invested in the development of the new Technological University (TU) Dublin campus at Grangegorman. Hence, the proceeds from these properties are effectively ring-fenced. As well as providing extensive education and health infrastructure, the Grangegorman development is a catalyst for significant urban regeneration in Dublin’s north inner city. Having regard to the requirement that the funds from the Kevin St disposal would be reinvested in the Grangegorman development, the acquisition of Kevin Street site by the LDA did not arise.

Emergency Accommodation Data

Questions (1359)

Eoin Ó Broin

Question:

1359. Deputy Eoin Ó Broin asked the Minister for Housing, Planning and Local Government the number of supported temporary accommodation facilities funded by each lead authority; the service provider in each case; the number of beds in each facility; and the gender of the clientele at the end of 2018. [12835/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Housing)

My Department’s role in relation to homelessness involves the provision of a national framework of policy, legislation and funding to underpin the role of housing authorities in addressing homelessness at the local level.

My Department does not provide funding for services directly but provides funding to housing authorities towards operational costs for homeless accommodation and related services. Under funding arrangements, housing authorities must provide at least 10% of the cost of services from their own resources. Housing authorities may also incur additional expenditure on homeless related services outside of the funding arrangement with my Department. The provision of emergency accommodation is generally contracted out by local authorities to NGO homeless service providers and local authorities work with these service providers to ensure that appropriate supports are in place in all homelessness accommodation.

Financial reports setting out expenditure on homeless services, including funding provided to NGOs towards the provision of homeless accommodation for 2017, are published on my Department's website at the following link: www.housing.gov.ie/housing/homelessness/other/homelessness-data.

The financial reports for each of the regions for 2018 are being collated and will be published on my Department's website shortly.

Monthly homelessness data reports are produced by housing authorities using the Pathway Accommodation & Support System (PASS), the single integrated national data information system on State-funded emergency accommodation arrangements overseen by housing authorities. My Department collates this information into monthly national homelessness reports, which are available on my Department’s website at the following link: www.housing.gov.ie/housing/homelessness/other/homelessness-data.

While these monthly reports include a breakdown of adults based on gender and accommodation type at regional level, details in relation to gender and the number of beds in individual temporary supported accommodation facilities are not available in my Department and are a matter for the relevant housing authorities.

Planning Issues

Questions (1360, 1361)

Éamon Ó Cuív

Question:

1360. Deputy Éamon Ó Cuív asked the Minister for Housing, Planning and Local Government when a decision will be made on a stage 3 application for voluntary housing submitted by Galway County Council for a voluntary housing group (details supplied) on 20 November 2018; the reason for the delay in approving this application at stage 3; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [12840/19]

View answer

Éamon Ó Cuív

Question:

1361. Deputy Éamon Ó Cuív asked the Minister for Housing, Planning and Local Government when a decision will be made on a CAS 2 application submitted on15 February 2019 by Galway County Council; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [12841/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Housing)

I propose to take Questions Nos. 1360 and 1361 together.

I note the two projects referred to by the Deputy.

The CAS 2 application referred to by the Deputy was submitted to my Department on 15 February 2019 and was incomplete. Information that had been requested at a prior stage had been omitted and the information in question is required in order for my Department to assess the project. My Department is currently liaising with Galway County Council in this regard.

In relation to the further project referred to by the Deputy, I can confirm, after intensive engagement by my Department with the local authority, stage 3 (pre-tender) approval issued from my Department on 8 March 2019.

My Department is committed to accelerating the delivery of social housing and will continue to work with all local authorities in this regard, particularly to ensure that stage approvals by my Department are acted on expeditiously by local authorities and Approved Housing Bodies.

Irish Red Cross Awards

Questions (1362)

Michael Healy-Rae

Question:

1362. Deputy Michael Healy-Rae asked the Minister for Housing, Planning and Local Government when medals will be awarded to service workers (details supplied); and if he will make a statement on the matter. [12845/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Housing)

While I am keenly aware of the very important role of volunteers in the Red Cross, my Department has no remit in relation to the organisation or its volunteers. I understand that the Red Cross falls under the remit of the Department of Defence.

Tenant Purchase Scheme

Questions (1363, 1388, 1397, 1410)

Eoin Ó Broin

Question:

1363. Deputy Eoin Ó Broin asked the Minister for Housing, Planning and Local Government the number of tenant purchase sales approved in each year since 2000, in tabular form. [12847/19]

View answer

Mattie McGrath

Question:

1388. Deputy Mattie McGrath asked the Minister for Housing, Planning and Local Government if a review of the tenant purchase scheme is nearing completion; if the qualifying conditions of same will be changed for persons, particularly older persons who may be in receipt of a pension but have a proven capacity to purchase their house using sources such as from savings or help from family members or proven income; when he expects to issue the report and its recommendations; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [13087/19]

View answer

Charlie McConalogue

Question:

1397. Deputy Charlie McConalogue asked the Minister for Housing, Planning and Local Government the status of the final report on the tenant purchase scheme; if it will be published; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [13292/19]

View answer

Willie Penrose

Question:

1410. Deputy Willie Penrose asked the Minister for Housing, Planning and Local Government the way in which a couple with a tenancy of more than 20 years can participate in the tenant purchase scheme (details supplied); and if he will make a statement on the matter. [13525/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Housing)

I propose to take Questions Nos. 1363, 1388, 1397 and 1410 together.

The Tenant (Incremental) Purchase Scheme is open to eligible tenants, including joint tenants, of local authority houses that are available for sale under the Scheme. To be eligible, tenants must meet certain criteria, including having a minimum reckonable income of €15,000 per annum and having been in receipt of social housing support for at least one year.

The minimum reckonable income for eligibility under the scheme is determined by the relevant local authority in accordance with the detailed provisions of the Ministerial Direction issued under Sections 24(3) and (4) of the Housing (Miscellaneous Provisions) Act 2014. In the determination of the minimum reckonable income, local authorities include income from a number of different sources and classes, such as from employment, private pensions, maintenance payments and certain social welfare payments, including pensions, where the social welfare payment is secondary to employment income.

In determining reckonable income, the income of all tenants of the house, including adult children that are joint tenants, is included, as is the income of the spouse, civil partner or other partner/co-habitant of a tenant who lives in the house with them, thus ensuring the appropriate level of discount is applied to the purchase price.

The minimum income criterion was introduced in order to ensure the sustainability of the scheme. Applicants must demonstrate that they have an income that is long-term and sustainable in nature. This ensures that the tenant purchasing the house is in a financial position, as the owner, to maintain and insure the property for the duration of the charged period, in compliance with the conditions of the order transferring the ownership of, and responsibility for, the house from the local authority to the tenant.

My Department publishes information on the sale of local authority houses each year. This can be accessed on my Department's website at the following link:

www.housing.gov.ie/housing/statistics/social-and-affordble/other-local-authority-housing-scheme-statistics.

Sales of houses between the years 2000-2015 were made under the terms of the 1995 Tenant Purchase Scheme or the 2011 Fixed term Tenant Purchase Scheme for long-standing tenants.

The Housing (Sale of Local Authority Houses) Regulations 2015 set the commencement date as 1 January 2016 for the introduction of the current incremental tenant purchase model. All sales from 1 January 2016 have been made under the terms of this Scheme.

In line with the commitment given in Rebuilding Ireland, a review of the operation of the first 12 months of the Tenant Purchase (Incremental) Scheme has been completed and a full report has been prepared setting out findings and recommendations. Following consideration of a number of implementation issues arising, I expect to be in a position to publish the Review shortly.

Social and Affordable Housing

Questions (1364, 1365, 1366, 1367, 1368, 1369)

Bríd Smith

Question:

1364. Deputy Bríd Smith asked the Minister for Housing, Planning and Local Government if an organisation (details supplied) informed Dublin City Council 28 days prior to 7 March 2018 that the site on which the organisation is building 72 homes would not be completed on time. [12870/19]

View answer

Bríd Smith

Question:

1365. Deputy Bríd Smith asked the Minister for Housing, Planning and Local Government in the event that an organisation (details supplied) received an extension of one year to complete works on a site, whether it informed Dublin City Council that the work would not be completed. [12871/19]

View answer

Bríd Smith

Question:

1366. Deputy Bríd Smith asked the Minister for Housing, Planning and Local Government if a site (details supplied) is legally owned by an organisation. [12872/19]

View answer

Bríd Smith

Question:

1367. Deputy Bríd Smith asked the Minister for Housing, Planning and Local Government if the reason Dublin City Council has not complied with the conditions of the Land Registry deeds will be investigated. [12873/19]

View answer

Bríd Smith

Question:

1368. Deputy Bríd Smith asked the Minister for Housing, Planning and Local Government if the land allocated for a linear park at a location (details supplied) will be returned. [12874/19]

View answer

Bríd Smith

Question:

1369. Deputy Bríd Smith asked the Minister for Housing, Planning and Local Government whether the lands at a location (details supplied) belong to the parks or housing departments of Dublin City Council. [12875/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Housing)

I propose to take Questions Nos. 1364 to 1369, inclusive, together.

Delivery of social housing is achieved using a range of delivery programmes and financing arrangements. This includes supporting both local authorities and Approved Housing Bodies (AHBs) to engage with contractors for the construction of new social housing homes.

Through local authorities, my Department provides AHBs with access to a range of funding streams to assist with the delivery of social housing, including the Capital Advance Leasing Facility (CALF). The CALF is a facility, which is exclusively available to AHBs to assist them in accessing private or Housing Finance Agency (HFA) finance for the purchase, construction or refurbishment of units that will then be made available for social housing purposes under the Social Housing Current Expenditure Programme (SHCEP).

It should be noted that local authorities and AHBs work together to ensure timely completion of projects. In relation to the project referred to by the Deputy, in April 2018, an extension of duration of permission for planning for this site was granted by Dublin City Council until 6 May 2019, within which time the works must be completed.

There are two separate systems for recording transactions in relation to property in Ireland and they are the Registry of Deeds system operated by the Registry of Deeds and the Registration of Title system operated by the Land Registry; both systems are under the control and management of the Property Registration Authority. Arrangements have been put in place by all bodies under the aegis of my Department to facilitate the provision of information directly to members of the Oireachtas. The contact email address for the Property Registration Authority is reps@prai.ie.

I, as Minister, am not a party to the land disposal agreements between local authorities and AHBs nor am I a party to the contractual agreements between an AHB and a developer or contractor. From enquiries made by my Department, the land disposal for this site was completed in June 2016.