Disability Allowance Applications

Questions (586)

Thomas Pringle

Question:

586. Deputy Thomas Pringle asked the Minister for Employment Affairs and Social Protection if an application for disability allowance by a person (details supplied) will be prioritised; and if she will make a statement on the matter. [24873/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Employment)

I can confirm that my department received an application for disability allowance (DA) from this gentleman on 17 April 2019.

On 11 June 2019 the person concerned was requested to supply supporting documentation required by the deciding officer in order to make a decision on his eligibility. On receipt of this information a decision will be made on his DA application and the person concerned will be notified of the outcome.

I trust this clarifies the matter for the Deputy.

Domiciliary Care Allowance Review

Questions (587)

Stephen Donnelly

Question:

587. Deputy Stephen Donnelly asked the Minister for Employment Affairs and Social Protection the process by which a randomised review will be carried out of the claims of those in receipt of domiciliary care allowance; and if she will make a statement on the matter. [24875/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Employment)

In line with other Social Welfare schemes, Domiciliary Care Allowance (DCA) is subject to review to ensure that the qualifying conditions for the scheme continue to be met.

In the case of DCA, scheduled eligibility reviews were suspended in May 2012 pending a review of the operation of the scheme and have remained suspended in the intervening period for a number of operational reasons, including introducing the recommendations of the report on the review of the scheme and the assignment of all available staff resources to process the increased volume of applications received in recent years. New claims are currently processed in line with the departmental standard (90% to be processed within 10 weeks), with claims finalised on average within 10 weeks.

The re-introduction of eligibility reviews at this time, is made possible in the context of having sufficient staff resources available to undertake reviews , without impacting on new claim processing times. It also fulfils the requirement to have proper control and oversight of claims in payment, as required by the comptroller and auditor general.

Eligibility for DCA is not based on the child's particular disability or the severity of the condition, but rather on the additional care needs arising from the disability. So the purpose of the review is to assess the child's current care needs, which may have changed over time as the child developed and as a result of receiving appropriate treatment/support.

The number of reviews will be small, initially 100 per month, from the 44,000 children currently in receipt of the allowance. The re-introduction of reviews has been discussed and agreed with the DCA Implementation group, comprising departmental staff and representatives of parent groups (NGOs).

Information notices have been sent to all groups and made available to Citizens Information Offices setting out the exact nature of the review programme and stressing the small number of reviews to be undertaken.

The timeline for completing review forms has been extended to 5 months, to allow parent sufficient time to gather any information they require to support their review. The Department has also committed to reverting to the parent before making a final decision, in the event that the decision would be negative, to give them a final chance to submit any additional information to support their ongoing eligibility to the allowance.

The Department will deal sensitively with any question raised by a parent who has any concern in relation to ongoing eligibility.

Children recommended by the departments medical advisors, as not requiring review due to their particular disability, will be exempted. Some 15% of claims are marked as 'not to be reviewed', due to the severity of the disability of the child.

I hope this clarifies the matter for the Deputy.

Social Welfare Appeals Delays

Questions (588)

Richard Boyd Barrett

Question:

588. Deputy Richard Boyd Barrett asked the Minister for Employment Affairs and Social Protection the reason for the delay in an appeal by a person (details supplied); when a decision will be made; and if she will make a statement on the matter. [24878/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Employment)

I am advised by the Social Welfare Appeals Office that an appeal by the person concerned was registered in that office on 14 February 2019. The case was assigned to an Appeals Officer who, having fully considered all of the available evidence, decided to disallow the appeal of the person concerned by way of a summary decision. The person concerned was notified of the Appeals Officer’s decision on 10 June 2019.

The Social Welfare Appeals Office functions independently of the Minister for Employment Affairs and Social Protection and of the Department and is responsible for determining appeals against decisions in relation to social welfare entitlements.

I trust this clarifies the matter for the Deputy.

Pensions Reform

Questions (589)

Michael Healy-Rae

Question:

589. Deputy Michael Healy-Rae asked the Minister for Employment Affairs and Social Protection her views on the cuts to be made to pensions (details supplied); and if she will make a statement on the matter. [24887/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Employment)

The introduction of a Total Contributions Approach (TCA) to establishing the level of entitlement for all new state pension contributory claims was signalled by the then Government in the National Pensions Framework in 2010. At that time it set a target date of 2020 for the implementation of TCA. More recently, the Roadmap for Pensions Reform 2018-2023 targeted implementation of the TCA from Q3 of 2020. This is subject to the necessary legislation being enacted and supporting structures being in place. Consultation is a very important part of the development and design of the new pension. With this in mind, I launched a public consultation on the design of the TCA on the 28th of May 2018 to which a wide variety of stakeholder groups were invited. A number of workshops were also held on the day to elicit views and feedback. Shortly afterwards, Oireachtas members were invited to a detailed briefing by my officials in Leinster House. The consultation was open for over 3 months and the Department received almost 300 responses from individuals and organisations. Those submissions outlined the views of respondents on the issues of most interest to them including how self-employed people and Class S PRSI contributions since 1988 could be treated.

Having carefully examined the outputs of the consultation process, my Department is now designing the scheme and I intend to shortly bring a proposal to Government setting out that design. When the Government has agreed the approach to be taken, I will initiate the work required to introduce this reform.

I believe that the Deputy's comments are a reference to a story printed in a farming publication recently, which made erroneous claims about this reform. I am informed that the publication in question has since then published a correction.

I hope this clarifies the matter for the Deputy.

Community Employment Schemes Data

Questions (590)

Dessie Ellis

Question:

590. Deputy Dessie Ellis asked the Minister for Employment Affairs and Social Protection the average cost of a community employment scheme employee; and if she will make a statement on the matter. [24903/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Employment)

Community Employment (CE) schemes are typically sponsored by groups (known as CE Sponsors) wishing to benefit the local community. Such schemes provide a valuable service to local communities, while at the same time, providing training and educational opportunities to job seekers.

The CE Programme has an annual budget of €345.115m. At the end of May 2019, there were 21,505 CE participants and 1,310 CE Supervisors/Assistant Supervisors employed on CE schemes.

The weekly average cost per participant is €305.17. The average participant cost includes all associated scheme costs including the training and materials costs and the participant and supervisor wages, which are necessary for the effective operation of the scheme.

The Government is very conscious of the role CE schemes play to support the delivery of vital services in local communities.

I trust this clarifies the matter for the Deputy.

Carer's Allowance Applications

Questions (591)

Robert Troy

Question:

591. Deputy Robert Troy asked the Minister for Employment Affairs and Social Protection if an application will be expedited for a carer's allowance for a person (details supplied). [24912/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Employment)

Carer's allowance (CA) is a means-tested social assistance payment made to a person who is habitually resident in the State and who is providing full-time care and attention to a child or an adult who has such a disability that as a result they require that level of care.

An application for CA was received from the person concerned on 5 March 2019.

As the spouse of applicant is self-employed, additional information was requested by a deciding officer from the person concerned on 10 June 2019. Once the information is received the application will be processed and she will be notified directly of the outcome.

I hope this clarifies the matter for the Deputy.

Carer's Benefit Applications

Questions (592)

Charlie McConalogue

Question:

592. Deputy Charlie McConalogue asked the Minister for Employment Affairs and Social Protection when a decision will be made on a carer's benefit application by a person (details supplied) in County Donegal; and if she will make a statement on the matter. [24914/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Employment)

Carer's benefit (CARB) is a PRSI based payment, made to a person who is providing full-time care and attention to a child or an adult who has such a disability that as a result they require that level of care.

Before a decision can be made on entitlement to CARB, evidence must be provided in respect of the care recipient’s care requirement, the level of care the carer provides, the carer’s hours of employment and their PRSI record.

An application for CARB was received from the person concerned on 28 March 2019.

Additional information in relation to the person’s application was requested by a deciding officer on 12 June 2019.

Once the information is received the application will be processed without delay and the person concerned will be notified directly of the outcome.

I hope this clarifies the matter for the Deputy .

Invalidity Pension Applications

Questions (593)

Seán Sherlock

Question:

593. Deputy Sean Sherlock asked the Minister for Employment Affairs and Social Protection if a decision will be expedited on an invalidity pension claim by a person (details supplied) in County Cork. [24920/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Employment)

Invalidity pension (IP) is a payment for people who are permanently incapable of work because of illness or incapacity and who satisfy the pay related social insurance (PRSI) contribution conditions.

To qualify for IP a claimant must, inter-alia, have at least 260 (5 years) paid PRSI contributions since entering social insurance and 48 contributions paid or credited in the last or second last complete contribution year before the relevant date for their claim.

The department received a claim for IP for the gentleman concerned on 21 March 2019. The claim was disallowed on 09 April 2019 on the grounds that the contribution conditions under national legislation for the scheme were not satisfied.

EU Regulations provide that insurance contributions made in any other EU Member State may be aggregated with Irish contributions in order to satisfy the contribution conditions for IP. A request was sent to the UK social security authorities requesting the gentleman's UK insurance record. Upon receipt of same, the IP claim will be finalised as soon as possible and he will be notified directly of the outcome.

I hope this clarifies the matter for the Deputy.

Disability Allowance Applications

Questions (594)

Seán Sherlock

Question:

594. Deputy Sean Sherlock asked the Minister for Employment Affairs and Social Protection when a disability allowance will be finalised for a person (details supplied) in County Cork. [24963/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Employment)

Following a successful appeal, this lady has been awarded disability allowance (DA) with effect from 9 May 2018. The first payment will be made by her chosen payment method on 19 June 2019.

Arrears of payment due, have issued to the person concerned.

I trust this clarifies the matter for the Deputy.

Carer's Benefit Eligibility

Questions (595)

John Brassil

Question:

595. Deputy John Brassil asked the Minister for Employment Affairs and Social Protection her views on a criterion set out for carer's benefit (details supplied); if she will review and reform the criteria; and if she will make a statement on the matter. [24976/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Employment)

The Government acknowledges the important role that family carers play and is fully committed to supporting carers in that role through a range of supports and services. This commitment is recognised in both the Programme for Government and the National Carers’ Strategy. The main income supports provided by my Department are Carer’s Allowance, Carer’s Benefit and the Carer’s Support Grant.

Carer's Benefit is a payment made to insured people who leave the workforce to care for a person or persons in need of full-time care and attention. It is payable for a maximum period of 104 weeks in respect of each person receiving care. It can be taken in one single period or in separate periods as long as the combined total does not exceed 104 weeks for each care recipient.

Being a full-time carer means that the carer must be living with or in a position to provide full-time care and attention to a person in need of care who is not living in an institution. However, Carer’s Benefit can continue to be paid on a short-term basis and the carer continues to be regarded as providing full-time care and attention, if they or the person being cared for is having medical or other treatment in a hospital or other institution for a period not longer than 13 weeks. This conditionality is set out in the respective legislative provisions governing the Carer’s Allowance, Carer’s Benefit, Domiciliary Care Allowance and Carer’s Support Grant schemes.

The 13 week provision is to ensure that the carer can continue to be paid when they themselves require medical treatment that requires them to spend some time in hospital, or when the person they are caring for requires medical care or respite on a short-term basis.

The supplementary welfare allowance (SWA) scheme is considered the "safety net" within the overall social welfare system in that it provides assistance to eligible people in the State whose means are insufficient to meet their needs and those of their dependants. Under the SWA scheme, my Department may award a supplement to assist with ongoing or recurring costs that cannot be met from the a person's own resources and which are deemed to be necessary. In addition, the Department can make a single exceptional needs payment (ENP) to help meet essential, once-off expenditure, which a person could not reasonably be expected to meet out of their weekly income. Payments are made at the discretion of the officers administering the scheme taking into account the requirements of the legislation and all the relevant circumstances of the case. Any person who consider they may have an entitlement under the SWA scheme should contact the Department's Community Welfare Service at their local INTREO centre.

I trust this clarifies the matter for the Deputy.

JobPath Data

Questions (596, 597, 598, 599, 600)

John Brady

Question:

596. Deputy John Brady asked the Minister for Employment Affairs and Social Protection the number of persons referred to JobPath since 2015; the number referred more than once; and the number of times they have been referred. [25019/19]

View answer

John Brady

Question:

597. Deputy John Brady asked the Minister for Employment Affairs and Social Protection the number of persons who have found employment with JobPath which has been sustained for 13, 26, 39 and 52 weeks, respectively. [25020/19]

View answer

John Brady

Question:

598. Deputy John Brady asked the Minister for Employment Affairs and Social Protection the amount spent on JobPath to date. [25021/19]

View answer

John Brady

Question:

599. Deputy John Brady asked the Minister for Employment Affairs and Social Protection the number of persons referred to community employment and Tús while engaged with JobPath. [25022/19]

View answer

John Brady

Question:

600. Deputy John Brady asked the Minister for Employment Affairs and Social Protection the number of persons referred to JobPath while engaging with community employment, Tús and other schemes. [25023/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Employment)

I propose to take Questions Nos. 596 to 600, inclusive together.

The Department of Employment Affairs and Social Protection provides a range of activation supports catering for long-term unemployed jobseekers and those most distant from the labour market to secure and sustain full-time paid employment. These supports include the JobPath service, the Local Employment Service, Job Clubs, Tús and Community Employment (CE). The primary purpose of JobPath is to provide a case management based, employment advice and counselling service to long term unemployed jobseekers. This is the group of jobseekers facing the most significant barriers to entering full-time employment.

My Department selects clients for the JobPath service by means of a random selection process. Between July 2015 and May 2019, just over 226,850 jobseekers had commenced their engagement period with the JobPath service. Protocols for selection currently preclude the selection of anyone who has already completed 52 weeks with the JobPath service within the previous four months. If, however, at the end of this period the jobseeker has not engaged in other activation supports and services, they then become eligible for selection for a subsequent period of activation on the JobPath service. This is necessary to ensure that they continue to receive a case management service.

To date, 27,830 jobseekers have been referred to the service more than once. Of these, 27,476 jobseekers have commenced a second engagement period, having previously availed of the service and 354 people have commenced a third engagement period. Jobseekers referred for a subsequent referral will start working with a Personal Advisor who will review their development during their previous engagements with the service and together they will prepare a new personal progression plan to build on that progress. The actions and tasks agreed will be based on their previous engagements, with particular focus on any remaining barriers preventing the person from moving into full-time suitable employment.

To date, some 51,500 jobseekers have commenced employment during their engagement period with JobPath as set out in table 1 below. It should be noted that the figures presented are representative of the entire cohort of JobPath clients between July 2015 and May 2019 and all job starts in the same period. Many clients who are currently engaged with JobPath are still in the first phase of the service and will not have had sufficient time with the service to have gained employment nor sustain that employment for up to 52 weeks. Performance will improve as more clients complete their engagement with the service and have a chance to reach 52 weeks in employment.

Between July 2015 and the end of December 2017 - a time period where the full impact of JobPath and job sustainment can now be measured - 146,849 jobseekers, mostly more than two years unemployed, had engaged with the JobPath service of whom 37,610 had commenced employment. These employment start and sustainment rates are significantly higher than the historical counterfactual level prior to JobPath, employment progression rates for this group - even during periods of economic growth.

JobPath is a payment by results model and all set-up and day-to-day operational costs are borne by the companies. The companies are paid on the basis of performance and with the exception of the initial registration fee; payments are made only when a client has achieved sustained employment. The overall cost of JobPath will be determined by the number of people who participate in the programme and the number who get sustainable jobs. The total of fees claimed by the JobPath providers to the end of May 2019 is €182 million.

The Tús initiative is a community work placement scheme providing short-term working opportunities for unemployed people. These work opportunities benefit the community and are provided by community and voluntary organisations in both urban and rural areas. There are currently 6,500 budgeted places on Tús involved in the delivery of local services.

The aim of Community Employment is to enhance the employability and mobility of disadvantaged and unemployed persons by providing work experience and training opportunities for them within their communities. Virtually all participants are engaged in some element of service support and delivery - e.g. amenities management, sports, tidy towns, childcare, etc. There are currently 921 Community Employment schemes catering for 21,371 participants.

Persons who are engaged with CE and Tús do not get referred to JobPath. Since June 2018, long-term jobseekers engaged with the JobPath service can also apply for either Community Employment or Tús should they wish to do so. This enables those people with the JobPath service to avail of a CE or Tús placement which provides valuable occupational activity and work experience. However, continued engagement with the JobPath service is a condition of opting to avail of both schemes. Of the 74,000 currently engaged with the JobPath service, 1,537 are availing of a CE placement and 1,226 are availing of Tús placement.

I trust that this clarifies matter for the Deputy.

Table 1: JobPath referrals and employment sustainments as of 31 May 2019

Jobseekers referred

226,851

Jobseekers with multiple referrals

27,830

Jobseekers with a second referral

27,476

Jobseekers with a third referral

354

Commenced employment

51,548

Jobs sustained for 13 weeks to date

31,186

Jobs sustained for 26 weeks to date

24,234

Jobs sustained for 39 weeks to date

18,808

Jobs sustained for 52 weeks to date

14,617

State Pension (Contributory) Data

Questions (601)

John Brady

Question:

601. Deputy John Brady asked the Minister for Employment Affairs and Social Protection the number of persons who have had their State pension (contributory) payment reviewed; the number of reviews in which the payment rate was found to be incorrect; the number of persons who have seen an increase in their pension payment; and the value of increases being awarded. [25024/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Employment)

Since late September 2018, my Department has been examining the social insurance records of approximately 90,000 pensioners, born on or after 1 September 1946, who have a reduced rate State pension contributory entitlement based on post Budget 2012 rate-bands. These payments are being reviewed under a new Total Contributions Approach (TCA) to pension calculation which includes provision for homecaring periods.

Reviews commenced from 13 February 2019, the day after I signed the necessary Regulations which, together with provisions in the Social Welfare, Pensions and Civil Registrations Act 2018, allows the increased payments to be made.

To date, 26,119 pensioners received an increase in their weekly rate of payment.

The current pension rate review involves applying the new aggregated contribution method calculation to existing claimants born on or after 1 September 1946 and in doing so, taking into account any eligible HomeCaring Periods the pensioner may have. The resultant payment rate is then compared by the Deciding Officer against the person's current rate of pension, calculated under the yearly average calculation method at the time of the original pension award. Where an increase is due, it is paid from the next available payment date, together with arrears backdated to 30 March 2018, or the pensioner's 66th birthday if later. Where no increase is due following review, the person will continue to receive their existing rate of payment. No one will be worse off as a result of this review.

The average weekly increase in personal rate of payment for those reviewed to 13 June 2019 is estimated to be approximately €19.90 per week.

I hope this clarifies the matter for the Deputy.

State Pension (Contributory) Appeals

Questions (602)

John Brady

Question:

602. Deputy John Brady asked the Minister for Employment Affairs and Social Protection if an appeals mechanism is in place in cases in which a State pension (contributory) payment rate is reviewed and no increase is awarded; and if she will make a statement on the matter. [25025/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Employment)

Since late September 2018, my Department has been examining the social insurance records of approximately 90,000 pensioners, born on or after 1 September 1946, who have a reduced rate State pension contributory entitlement based on post Budget 2012 rate-bands. These payments are being reviewed under a new Total Contributions Approach (TCA) pension calculation which includes provision for HomeCaring periods.

On receipt of formal review decision outcomes, pensioners receive a right of appeal, which is explained in their review outcome letter.

Where a Deciding Officer has examining entitlement under the new arrangements and determined that even if all insurance record gaps were filled with the maximum allowable Home caring periods no increase in rate would result, the pensioner is notified If the person wants this outcome explained to them they are encouraged to call the dedicated helpline. If the person wants a formal review decision, this will be provided together with the associated right of appeal.

I hope this clarifies the matter for the Deputy.

Domiciliary Care Allowance Review

Questions (603)

John Brady

Question:

603. Deputy John Brady asked the Minister for Employment Affairs and Social Protection her plans to review recipients of the domiciliary care allowance; the purpose of the review; the nature of the review; and if she will make a statement on the matter. [25026/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Employment)

In line with other Social Welfare schemes, Domiciliary Care Allowance (DCA) is subject to review to ensure that the qualifying conditions for the scheme continue to be met.

In the case of DCA, scheduled eligibility reviews were suspended in May 2012 pending a review of the operation of the scheme and have remained suspended in the intervening period for a number of operational reasons, including introducing the recommendations of the report on the review of the scheme and the assignment of all available staff resources to process the increased volume of applications received in recent years. New claims are currently processed in line with the departmental standard (90% to be processed within 10 weeks), with claims finalised on average within 10 weeks.

The re-introduction of eligibility reviews at this time, is made possible in the context of having sufficient staff resources available to undertake reviews , without impacting on new claim processing times. It also fulfils the requirement to have proper control and oversight of claims in payment, as required by the comptroller and auditor general.

Eligibility for DCA is not based on the child's particular disability or the severity of the condition, but rather on the additional care needs arising from the disability. So the purpose of the review is to assess the child's current care needs, which may have changed over time as the child developed and as a result of receiving appropriate treatment/support.

Children recommended by the departments medical advisors, as not requiring review due to their particular disability, will be exempted. Some 15% of claims are marked as 'not to be reviewed', due to the severity of the disability of the child.

I hope this clarifies the matter for the Deputy.

Disability Allowance Payments

Questions (604)

John Brady

Question:

604. Deputy John Brady asked the Minister for Employment Affairs and Social Protection if consideration is given to rental costs for recipients of disability allowance in cases in which payment rates are set through the means test. [25027/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Employment)

People receiving Disability Allowance who have rental costs may also qualify for Rent Supplement. Rent Supplement is a statutory means-tested scheme, payable at differentiated rates of payment according to the applicant’s means and accommodation requirements. It is normally calculated to ensure that a person, after the payment of rent, has an income equal to the rate of supplementary welfare allowance (SWA) appropriate to their family circumstances less a weekly minimum contribution which recipients are required to pay from their own resources. Assuming that a person has no other income, apart from disability allowance, the contribution expected would be €32 per week (or €129 per month) or €40 per week (or €173 per month) in the case of a couple.

Where a person with disabilities has secured part-time employment, they can continue to receive rent supplement provided they satisfy the standard means assessment rules. Generally, where a person has additional income in excess of the standard weekly rate of supplementary welfare allowance, the first €75 of such additional income together with 25% of any additional income above €75 is disregarded for means assessment purposes. There is an alternative disregard available to persons receiving disability allowance (or blind pension), which is that up to €120 of earnings from training or part time employment can be disregarded in full. Only one of these earnings disregards can be applied to a person’s income. Which of these is most beneficial will depend on the person's level of earnings.

Where recipients of Disability Allowance are being paid maintenance by ex-partners, a €95.23 weekly disregard on housing costs can be applied.

The Department continues to implement a targeted case-by-case flexible payment policy approach – the National Tenancy Sustainment Framework - which allows for flexibility where landlords seek rents in excess of the rent limits. Included within this Framework is the additional assistance required by persons with disabilities who require specially modified accommodation.

Local Employment Service

Questions (605)

John Brady

Question:

605. Deputy John Brady asked the Minister for Employment Affairs and Social Protection the status of plans for the future of the local employment service. [25028/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Employment)

The Local Employment Services and Job Clubs contracts are reviewed on an annual basis to ensure they are fit-for-purpose in the context of a greatly improved Irish labour market, while providing value for money for taxpayers. Indecon, in its reviews of LES and Job Clubs published in January, recommended that my Department consider the introduction of multiannual contracts and a competitive procurement process for future provision of these services. My Department has also received legal advice to the effect that renewing the LES and Job Clubs contracts annually, without any movement towards competitive procurement is no longer legally sustainable. Accordingly, a new process for procuring contracted public employment services currently provided by the LES and Job Clubs is at present in the early stages of development. My officials are working to design and procure a new model that will balance the need for value for money for taxpayers with the importance of preserving high-quality employment advisory and counselling services. Officials will engage with and consult practitioners and stakeholders to gather their views on an appropriate tender design.

I am on the record in recognising the valuable work performed by Local Employment Services and Job Clubs and it is my view that any future tendering criteria should give due recognition to track records in delivering high quality, locally based services.

Invalidity Pension Applications

Questions (606)

Seán Sherlock

Question:

606. Deputy Sean Sherlock asked the Minister for Employment Affairs and Social Protection when a decision will be finalised on an invalidity pension appeal by a person (details supplied) in County Kildare. [25061/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Employment)

On receipt of additional medical evidence submitted in support of the appeal of the gentleman concerned, a review of the claim was carried out by a deciding officer and he has been awarded invalidity pension with effect 26 April 2018. Payment will issue to his nominated bank account on 27 June 2019. Any arrears due from 26 April 2018 to 26 June 2019 (less any overlapping social welfare payment) will issue in due course. The gentleman in question was notified of this decision on 13 June 2019.

The gentleman has also claimed an increase for qualified child(ren) (IQC). On 13 June 2019 the deciding officer requested further information from him in order to assess eligibility for an IQC. As soon as this information has been received the IQC claim will be finalised as quickly as possible and he will be notified directly of the outcome.

I hope this clarifies the matter for the Deputy.