Emergency Accommodation Data

Questions (802, 803)

Jim O'Callaghan

Question:

802. Deputy Jim O'Callaghan asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the details of emergency accommodation centres, hotels and bed and breakfasts for asylum seekers; the centres which provide proper washing facilities for residents; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [32834/19]

View answer

Jim O'Callaghan

Question:

803. Deputy Jim O'Callaghan asked the Minister for Justice and Equality if there is a lack of proper washing facilities available for asylum seekers living in emergency accommodation centres; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [32835/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Justice)

I propose to take Questions Nos. 802 and 803 together.

The Reception and Integration Agency (RIA) has arranged the provision of emergency accommodation for international protection applicants since September 2018 due to the increasing numbers of people arriving in the State seeking international protection. RIA had reached full capacity in its centres at that time.

As of 14 July 2019, RIA is accommodating 981 people in 29 emergency accommodation locations across the country. RIA will continue to use emergency accommodation for as short a time as possible and is actively working on securing additional capacity, both in existing centres and through sourcing new centres via a national procurement process.

RIA has a legal duty to protect the identities of persons in the international protection process and must be mindful of the right to privacy of applicants when responding to specific queries. As such, the Department can confirm that temporary emergency accommodation is being provided in counties Cavan, Clare, Dublin, Meath, Monaghan, Laois, Leitrim, Limerick, Offaly, Louth, Tipperary, Wicklow and Wexford. The Department cannot however confirm the specific emergency accommodation locations or exact family configuration as this could lead to the identity the applicants becoming known.

Washing facilities are available at every emergency accommodation location. In emergency accommodation locations, most rooms have en-suite bathrooms. A small number of premises provide communal bathroom facilities.

While an international protection claim is being examined, the State offers accommodation and related services to anyone who accepts that offer. This includes all meals, medical care and utilities. A weekly personal allowance is paid to each person and the Department of Employment Affairs and Social Protection cover exceptional needs. The Department of Education and Skills provides school places for children resident in the centres and children also have access to the free pre-school scheme, the Early Childhood Care and Education programme. The HSE provides mainstreamed health services to residents. It is a whole-of-Government approach to supports and services for applicants.

Residents in emergency accommodation are offered medical screening funded and managed by the HSE located at the Balseskin Reception facility for the purpose of assessing recipients who have just arrived in the State. In addition, arrangements are in place in various parts of the country to offer this service to those who do not avail of it in Dublin. The Department of Employment Affairs and Social Protection assist in the process of linking residents with local Social Welfare officers and a similar policy is in place with the Department of Education to assist with educational needs. Staff from RIA have also arranged to meet with residents in these accommodation settings to address any concerns that they may have. RIA is also seeking to contract a Visiting Support and Cultural Liaison Service from the NGO community to assist those residents during their time in emergency accommodation.

Residents in emergency accommodation can address any issues directly to RIA. They may also contact the Ombudsman or the Ombudsman for Children if any issue is not resolved to their satisfaction. Additionally, RIA has facilitated visits by the Office of the Ombudsman to a number of emergency accommodation locations to meet with residents.

Due to significant demand, RIA has sought to identify additional accommodation by publishing expressions of interest in the national press as the current accommodation portfolio will not meet the increasing demand.

Immigration Status

Questions (804)

Bernard Durkan

Question:

804. Deputy Bernard J. Durkan asked the Minister for Justice and Equality when an update of stamp 4 status will issue in the case of a person (details supplied); and if he will make a statement on the matter. [32852/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Justice)

I am advised by the Irish Naturalisation and Immigration Service (INIS) of my Department that the person concerned was initially granted permission to remain in the State, on a stamp 4 basis, on 27 May, 2016. This permission was subsequently renewed with the latest permission granted up to 27 May, 2021.

I am further advised by INIS that a determination on whether the person satisfies the criteria to be granted permission to reside based on parentage of an Irish citizen child may be made upon presentation of relevant supporting documentation, to their local immigration office, such as the child's Irish passport and evidence of place of residence.  It should be noted, that this option is available in circumstances where the person currently has permission to reside in the State.  In circumstances where the permission has expired, the person must make an application to INIS.  Further information in relation the parent of an Irish Citizen Child application process for persons who have no current immigration permission can be found on the INIS website www.inis.gov.ie.

Queries in relation to the status of individual immigration cases may be made directly to the INIS of my Department by e-mail using the Oireachtas Mail facility which has been specifically established for this purpose. This service enables up to date information on such cases to be obtained without the need to seek information by way of the parliamentary questions process. The Deputy may consider using the e-mail service except in cases where the response from the INIS is, in the Deputy’s view, inadequate or too long awaited.

Prison Visiting Committees

Questions (805)

Jim O'Callaghan

Question:

805. Deputy Jim O'Callaghan asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the number of vacancies on each prison visiting committee; the actions taken to address the vacancies; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [32878/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Justice)

A Visiting Committee is assigned to each of the current 12 prisons and Places of Detention under the Prison (Visiting Committees) Act, 1925 and Prisons (Visiting Committees) Order, 1925. 

Each committee is to consist of such number of responsible persons, not being more than twelve nor less than six, as the Minister shall think proper.  At present there are 56 Visiting Committee members and there are 17 vacancies in total, as outlined in the table below. Every effort is made to fill vacancies as quickly as possible.  It will be appreciated that all applicants for these positions must undergo Garda vetting and this may lead to some delays in vacancies being filled.

 

Prison

Current Members

Current Vacancies

1

Arbour Hill Prison

5

1

2

Castlerea Prison

5

1

3

Cloverhill Prison

3

3

4

Cork Prison

5

1

5

Dóchas Centre 

4

2

6

Limerick Prison

5

1

7

Loughan House Open Centre

2

4

8

Midlands Prison

7

0

9

Mountjoy Prison

5

1

10

Portlaoise Prison

6

0

11

Shelton Abbey Open Centre

5

1

12

Wheatfield Place of Detention

4

2

 

Total Vacancies

56

17

 The function of visiting committees is to visit at frequent intervals the prison to which they are appointed and hear any complaints which may be made to them by any prisoner. The visiting committee have free access, either collectively or individually to every part of their prison. In inspecting prisons, the visiting committees focus on issues such as the quality of accommodation, catering, medical, educational, welfare and recreational facilities.

 The role of Visiting Committees will be considered in the context of the drafting of the General Scheme of the Inspection of Places of Detention Bill which is the vehicle intended to be used to implement the Optional Protocol to the Convention against Torture (OPCAT).  My Department are in the process of completing a draft scheme of this Bill which I intend to share with key stakeholders for their observations before it is finalised and I bring it to Government for approval later this year.

Prison Service Staff

Questions (806)

Jim O'Callaghan

Question:

806. Deputy Jim O'Callaghan asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the vacancies within the Irish Prison Service for which it is recruiting; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [32879/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Justice)

I am advised by the Irish Prison Service that staffing requirements are continuously monitored, vacancies can arise as a result of multiple factors including mobility, promotions and retirements.

I am further advised that the Irish Prison Service recruitment process is on-going, internal promotional competitions are held to fill vacancies at all levels of the organisation as they arise.  The Irish Prison Service also engages in external recruitment, either directly as a recruitment licence holder, or through the Public Appointments Service, for certain posts of a specialised nature.

Currently the Irish Prison Service are filling vacancies for Prison Clerical Officers, Recruit Prison Officers, Prison Nurses along with some Senior Level grades.

Legislative Process

Questions (807)

Catherine Connolly

Question:

807. Deputy Catherine Connolly asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the status of the criminal justice (passenger name record) Bill; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [32897/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Justice)

The European Union (Passenger Name Record Data) Regulations (S.I. 177/2018) were introduced to give effect to the non-discretionary provisions of Directive (EU) 2016/681 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 27 April 2016 on the use of passenger name record (PNR) data for the prevention, detection, investigation and prosecution of terrorist offences and serious crime in May 2018, in accordance with s.3 of the European Communities Act 1972.

The Directive provides for the collection and processing of PNR data by Member States and for the exchange of PNR data between Member States.  The Directive provides for the establishment of a Passenger Information Unit (PIU) in each Member State to collect, process and exchange PNR data. Air carriers are required to provide advance PNR data to Member States’ PIUs on all flights entering or departing the EU - that is extra-EU flights.  PNR data is analysed by the PIUs and transferred to other Member States’ PIUs and to national competent authorities for further analysis when persons considered a possible threat have been identified. Ireland’s PIU commenced operation in Dublin Airport on 25 May 2018 last.

The Directive also provides for a number of discretionary provisions in that Member States may also require airlines to collect PNR data in respect of flights operating within the EU - that is intra-EU flights. The PNR requirements of the Directive may also be extended to travel agents and tour operators which collect and process PNR data.  Drafting of the Criminal Justice (Passenger Name Record) Bill, which will give effect to a number of the non-discretionary provisions of the Directive, is at a preliminary stage.

Garda Data

Questions (808)

Catherine Connolly

Question:

808. Deputy Catherine Connolly asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the number of gardaí by rank and Garda staff by job title working in the national forensic co-ordination office as at 1 July 2018 and 1 July 2019, in tabular form; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [32898/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Justice)

I have requested a report from the Commissioner in relation to the matter referred to by the Deputy and I will revert to him when it is to hand.

Garda Training

Questions (809)

Catherine Connolly

Question:

809. Deputy Catherine Connolly asked the Minister for Justice and Equality if funding will be allocated for the construction of an indoor and outdoor firearm range for training of firearms by armed gardaí; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [32899/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Justice)

As the Deputy will appreciate, in accordance with the Garda Síochána Act 2005, the Garda Commissioner is responsible for managing and controlling the administration and business of An Garda Síochána, including arrangements relating to the training of members. Further, the allocation of Garda resources is a matter for the Commissioner, in light of identified operational demands. As Minister, I have no direct role in these matters.

I have asked the Commissioner for the information requested and I will write directly to the Deputy when I receive it.

Immigration Status

Questions (810)

Anne Rabbitte

Question:

810. Deputy Anne Rabbitte asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the status of a visa application by a person (details supplied) lodged with the INIS in May 2018; when the person can expect a decision to be made; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [32909/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Justice)

I am advised by the Irish Naturalisation and Immigration Service (INIS) of my Department that the person's request is currently under active consideration.  I understand that its is expected INIS will issue a decision to the person concerned, in writing, by the end of July.

Queries in relation to the status of individual immigration cases may be made directly to the INIS of my Department by e-mail using the Oireachtas Mail facility which has been specifically established for this purpose. This service enables up to date information on such cases to be obtained without the need to seek information by way of the Parliamentary Questions process. The Deputy may consider using the e-mail service except in cases where the response from the INIS is, in the Deputy’s view, inadequate or too long awaited. 

Asylum Seeker Accommodation

Questions (811, 812)

Thomas P. Broughan

Question:

811. Deputy Thomas P. Broughan asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the number of single persons and families with children in direct provision centres per county; the number in this type of emergency accommodation for periods (details supplied), respectively in tabular form; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [32918/19]

View answer

Thomas P. Broughan

Question:

812. Deputy Thomas P. Broughan asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the number of single persons and families with children seeking asylum being held in hotel rooms, bed and breakfasts and guesthouses by county; the number in this type of emergency accommodation for periods (details supplied), respectively in tabular form; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [32919/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Justice)

I propose to take Questions Nos. 811 and 812 together.

The statistical data requested by the Deputy is detailed in the tabular statement attached, which covers the period up until 18 July 2019.

Under EU and international law, Ireland, like other countries, is obliged to examine the claim of any person who comes here and claims international protection under defined grounds.

While an international protection claim is being examined, the State offers accommodation and related services to anyone who accepts that offer. This includes all meals, medical care and utilities. A weekly personal allowance is paid to each person and the Department of Employment Affairs and Social Protection cover exceptional needs.

Children of International Protection applicants can attend local mainstream primary and post-primary schools and the HSE provides health services. This is a whole-of-Government approach to supports and services for applicants.

There is no obligation on anyone to accept the offer of accommodation. Applicants may source their own private accommodation and there is no restriction on the freedom of movement of applicants throughout the State.

The Reception and Integration Agency (RIA) of my Department is experiencing significant upward pressure on its accommodation portfolio due to an increase in the numbers of persons claiming international protection and a growth in the percentage of protection applicants who require assistance with accommodation.

In order to ensure that the State can continue to provide accommodation for all protection applicants and continue to comply with the EU (recast) Reception Conditions Directive, which was transposed into Irish law in 2018, RIA has, since September 2018, arranged for the provision of emergency beds where the mainstream accommodation centres were at capacity.

There is also a need to resolve the issue of suitable mainstream housing for over 750 people residing in RIA accommodation who have an international protection status or a permission to remain in the State. Enabling these people to transition into mainstream housing will free up capacity in our accommodation centres. This in turn will allow those people currently in emergency accommodation to remain in emergency accommodation for as short a period as possible. The Department is providing funding to organisations like Depaul Ireland and the Peter McVerry Trust to assist people with status to transition to mainstreaming housing.

RIA’s regional procurement process is also advancing and will be continuing throughout the year. Following the assessment process and as RIA identifies new accommodation centres to be opened, coordinated communications will be initiated including with all relevant local authorities and State partners such as the HSE, the Department of Education and Skills and the Department of Employment and Social Protection.

Family Breakdown in RIA Accommodation July 18th 2019

County

RIA Accommodation Centre

Single Males

Single Female

Married/Partners no Children

Married/Partners with Child(ren)

Lone Parent Family

Clare

Knockalisheen

146

20

1

8

8

King Thomond

0

16

6

20

16

Ashbourne Hse

2

1

5

13

8

Davis Lane

1

1

1

7

3

Kinsale Road 

117

45

3

12

22

Glenvera

120

4

0

0

1

Millstreet

41

20

5

24

27

Cork

Clonakilty Lodge

4

5

6

10

17

The Towers

48

56

3

10

17

Hatch Hall 

54

40

2

7

8

Dublin

Balseskin

88

40

10

15

22

Eglinton

1

43

1

19

24

Galway

Great Western House

156

0

0

0

0

Atlas House (Killarney)

4

15

2

5

14

Atlas House (Tralee)

101

0

0

0

0

Atlantic Lodge 

45

17

0

5

1

Johnston Marina

2

22

5

7

7

Linden House

54

0

0

0

0

Kerry

Park Lodge

0

43

0

0

0

Hazel

64

9

1

6

3

Kildare 

Eyrepowell

47

30

0

6

7

Hibernian Hotel

0

1

3

4

9

Laois

Montague

92

34

5

6

13

Hanratty's

101

5

1

0

0

Limerick

Mount Trenchard

78

0

0

0

0

Longford

Richmond Court 

73

0

0

0

0

Louth 

Carroll Village (APT)

7

4

0

6

6

Mayo

The Old Convent

20

15

0

15

33

Meath

Mosney

60

53

9

76

81

Monaghan 

St. Patricks 

38

21

2

17

15

Sligo

Globe House

89

46

0

9

5

Tipperary

Bridgewater House

31

16

2

18

15

Atlantic House

79

0

0

0

0

Ocean View

12

7

1

19

15

Birchwood

28

26

2

10

13

Waterford

Viking House

76

0

0

0

0

Wicklow

The Grand Hotel

37

13

1

9

5

Temple  Accommodation

36

23

0

3

3

Westmeath

Athlone

76

4

3

27

30

Family Breakdown in Emergency Accommodation July 18th 2019

Single Males

Single Female

Married/Partners no Child(ren)

Married/Partners with Child(ren)

Lone Parent Family

Emergency Accommodation

440

191

38

41

56

*Single=no Children/Families Married/Partner no Child(ren)=Couples with no Children, Married/Partner with Chid(ren)=Couples with One Child or More

Lone Parent Family=Single Adults with one or more child(ren)

For the columns Married/Partners no Child(ren), Married with Child(ren), Lone Parent Families, each number represents a single family unit which may include one or more children. Accordingly, the number of units is counted, not the number of individuals.

These figures are a snapshot of data generated on AISIP Reports on July 18th 2019

Departmental Surveys

Questions (813)

Anne Rabbitte

Question:

813. Deputy Anne Rabbitte asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the number of feasibility studies conducted by his Department in County Galway in each of the years 2016 to 2018 and to date in 2019, in tabular form; the names of each project being studied; the amount allocated and drawn down for each study; the person or body that sought each study; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [32946/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Justice)

My Department did not conduct any such studies in County Galway during the years referred to.

Prisoner Data

Questions (814)

Mattie McGrath

Question:

814. Deputy Mattie McGrath asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the number of non-nationals imprisoned here since 2011; the crimes committed by such persons; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [32975/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Justice)

I can advise the Deputy that the number of non-nationals committed to prison  from 2011 until the end of 2018 is included in table 1. This table reports on committals rather than persons, as an individual can be committed more than once in a given year.

I can further advise the Deputy that the number of non nationals held on Remand/Trial warrants over the same period is set out in table 2.

Non National Sentenced Committals classified by Offence Group Description

Offence Group Description

Year 2011

Year 2012

Year 2013

Year 2014

Year 2015

Year 2016

Year 2017

Year 2018

Homicide Offences

8

4

9

6

3

10

9

0

Sexual Offences

21

26

20

23

16

30

27

36

Attempts/Threats to Murder, Assaults, Harassments and Related Offences

87

51

58

56

45

71

61

56

Dangerous or Negligent Acts

189

170

138

119

81

64

30

17

Kidnapping and Related Offences

1

3

3

3

6

2

7

2

Robbery, Extortion and Hijacking Offences

4

4

6

3

1

0

5

1

Burglary and Related Offences

57

39

34

16

24

17

17

26

Theft and Related Offences

250

250

209

189

183

184

149

137

Fraud, Deception and Related Offences

73

74

82

55

52

40

29

26

Controlled Drug Offences

104

152

160

159

120

98

66

75

Weapons and Explosives Offences

11

15

11

21

13

14

15

9

Damage to Property and to the Environment Offences

39

43

37

41

25

27

20

27

Public Order and Other Social Code Offences

163

177

152

141

110

109

52

49

Road and Traffic Offences

403

468

411

438

540

439

186

138

Offences against Government, Justice Procedures and Organised Crime

136

164

113

150

196

242

197

99

Offences Not Elsewhere Classified

62

67

86

93

104

101

36

18

Total Non National Sentenced Committals

1,608

1,707

1,529

1,513

1,519

1,448

906

716

Overall number of committals

17,318

17,026

15,735

16,155

17,206

15,099

9,287

8,071

Non National Committals classified by Warrant Type Description

Year

Trial/Remand Warrant

Year 2018

714

Year 2017

783

Year 2016

685

Year 2015

688

Year 2014

692

Year 2013

745

Year 2012

893

Year 2011

1,191

Prison Service Expenditure

Questions Nos. 816 and 817 answered with Question No. 692.

Questions (815)

Mattie McGrath

Question:

815. Deputy Mattie McGrath asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the cost of interpreters to the Irish Prison Service in each of the years 2011 to 2018 and to date in 2019; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [32976/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Justice)

I wish to inform the Deputy that it has not been possible in the timeframe available to collate the information sought, I will revert to the Deputy as soon as this information is compiled.

Questions Nos. 816 and 817 answered with Question No. 692.

Garda Transport Data

Questions (818)

John Brady

Question:

818. Deputy John Brady asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the number and type of Garda vehicles attached to the Wicklow division in each of the years 2009 to 2018 and to date in 2019, by division, district and sub-district in tabular form. [32992/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Justice)

The resources provided by Government to An Garda Síochána have reached unprecedented levels, with an allocation for 2019 of €1.76 billion.  Very significant capital investment is also being made in An Garda Síochána, including a total of €46 million for investment in the Garda fleet between 2016 and 2021.  This continuing investment is intended to ensure that An Garda Síochána can be mobile, visible and responsive on the roads and in the community to prevent and tackle crime.

The Deputy may also wish to be aware that a capital allocation of €10 million has been made available for the purchase and fit-out of Garda vehicles in 2019.  I understand from the Garda authorities that this allocation will be used for purchase and fit-out of over 300 new vehicles for operational use this year.

As the Deputy will appreciate, in accordance with the Garda Síochána Act 2005 as amended, the Garda Commissioner is responsible for managing and controlling the administration and business of An Garda Síochána.  Further, the allocation of Garda resources is a matter for the Commissioner, in light of identified operational demands. This includes responsibility for the allocation of Garda vehicles among the various Garda divisions.  As Minister, I have no role in these matters. I am assured, however, that Garda management keeps the distribution of resources under continual review in the context of crime trends and policing priorities to ensure their optimum use.

The Garda authorities have provided the attached spreadsheet which I am informed outlines the number of vehicles allocated to the Wicklow Division for the years requested by the Deputy. 

Garda Fleet by year from 2009 to 2019 - Wicklow Division

2019 (correct to 17 July)

Cars

Vans

Motorcycles

4x4

Others

Total

Baltinglass

10

2

0

1

0

13

Bray

19

4

1

1

1

26

Wicklow

12

4

0

3

1

20

Wicklow Division 

41

10

1

5

2

59

2018

Cars

Vans

Motorcycles

4x4

Others

Total

Baltinglass

10

3

0

1

0

14

Bray

19

4

1

1

1

26

Wicklow

13

4

0

3

1

21

Wicklow Division 

42

11

1

5

2

61

2017

Cars

Vans

Motorcycles

4x4

Others

Total

Baltinglass

10

3

0

1

0

14

Bray

21

5

1

0

0

27

Wicklow

14

3

0

3

1

21

Wicklow Division 

45

11

1

4

1

62

2016

Cars

Vans

Motorcycles

4x4

Others

Total

Baltinglass

11

3

0

1

0

15

Bray

20

5

1

0

0

26

Wicklow

16

2

0

2

1

21

Wicklow Division 

47

10

1

3

1

62

2015

Cars

Vans

Motorcycles

4x4

Others

Total

Baltinglass

11

2

0

1

0

14

Bray

21

5

1

0

0

27

Wicklow

15

1

0

3

1

20

Wicklow Division 

47

8

1

4

1

61

2014

Cars

Vans

Motorcycles

4x4

Others

Total

Baltinglass

9

2

0

1

0

12

Bray

17

4

1

1

0

23

Wicklow

14

2

0

1

1

18

Wicklow Division 

40

8

1

3

1

53

2013

Cars

Vans

Motorcycles

4x4

Others

Total

Baltinglass

8

2

0

1

0

11

Bray

19

5

0

1

0

25

Wicklow

11

2

0

1

1

15

Wicklow Division 

38

9

0

3

1

51

2012

Cars

Vans

Motorcycles

4x4

Others

Total

Baltinglass

9

1

0

1

0

11

Bray

20

3

1

1

0

25

Wicklow

10

2

0

1

1

14

Wicklow Division 

39

6

1

3

1

50

2011

Cars

Vans

Motorcycles

4x4

Others

Total

Baltinglass

8

0

0

1

0

9

Bray

19

3

0

1

0

23

Wicklow

13

2

1

1

1

18

Wicklow Division 

40

5

1

3

1

50

Figures for 2009 and 2010 are only available on a Divisional basis, as listed in the following table

Wicklow Division

Cars

Vans

Motorcycles

4x4

Others

Total

2010

43

5

1

2

0

51

2009

45

6

2

3

0

56

*The category 'others' refers to MPV, SUV, Minibus or Prisoner Conveyance Vehicles

Garda Station Opening Hours

Question No. 820 answered with Question No. 692.

Questions (819)

John Brady

Question:

819. Deputy John Brady asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the weekly opening hours of each station in the Wicklow division in each of the years 2009 to 2018 and to date in 2019. [32993/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Justice)

As the Deputy will appreciate, the Garda Commissioner is primarily responsible for the effective and efficient use of the resources made available to An Garda Síochána. This includes responsibility for the formulation of proposals in relation to the opening and closing of Garda stations and the allocation of resources in that regard.

I have asked the Garda Commissioner for the information requested and I will write directly to the Deputy when I receive it.

Question No. 820 answered with Question No. 692.

Garda Civilian Staff Data

Question No. 822 answered with Question No. 699.

Questions (821)

John Brady

Question:

821. Deputy John Brady asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the number of civilian staff attached to the Wicklow division in each of the years 2009 to 2018 and to date in 2019, by division, district and sub-district in tabular form. [32995/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Justice)

The Garda staff strength attached to the Wicklow Garda Division and stations from 2009 to 30 June 2019, as provided by the Garda Commissioner, is outlined in the following table.

Wicklow

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

Bray

11

11

11

10

8

9

9

10

11

11

14

Baltinglass

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

5

Blessington

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

0

Wicklow

6

6

5

5

5

5

5

6

7

8

9

Arklow

1

2

2

2

2

2

1

1

2

2

2

Greystones

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

Ashford

0

0

0

1

1

1

1

0

0

0

0

Total

24

25

24

24

22

23

22

23

26

27

31

I am informed by the Garda Commissioner that as of 30 June 2019, there were  31 Garda Staff assigned to the Wicklow Division. As of 31 May 2019, there were 2,675 Garda Staff employed by An Garda Síochána undertaking a range of administrative and technical duties across the organisation.

More generally, the Deputy will be aware, the Government's vision is for a Garda workforce of 21,000 personnel by 2021 to include 15,000 Garda members and 4,000 Garda Staff.  The projected 4,000 Garda Staff represents a medium-term target of 20% of the Garda full-time workforce comprised of civilians.

The continued growth of civilianisation within An Garda Síochána is supported by the Report of the Commission on the Future of Policing in Ireland.  This Report states that civilianisation should be seen as part of the strategic vision for the organisation, building a stronger skill mix and delivering a better service to the public.

Question No. 822 answered with Question No. 699.

Garda Youth Diversion Projects

Questions Nos. 824 to 827, inclusive, answered with Question No. 701.

Questions (823)

John Brady

Question:

823. Deputy John Brady asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the number of Garda youth diversion projects in the Wicklow division in each of the years 2009 to 2018 and to date in 2019; and the areas in which they are located. [32997/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Justice)

The information requested by the Deputy for the Wicklow Division is set out in the following table.

Project

Garda District

Years in operation from 2009

In operation until

New Directions

Bray

2009

Present

Way

Wicklow

2009

Present

Questions Nos. 824 to 827, inclusive, answered with Question No. 701.