Human Rights

Questions (440)

Bernard Durkan

Question:

440. Deputy Bernard J. Durkan asked the Minister for Foreign Affairs the extent to which child soldiers are being used in various conflicts worldwide at present; the efforts the international community continues to take to address these issues; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [38714/20]

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Written answers (Question to Foreign)

The recruitment of child soldiers remains a serious problem with tens of thousands of children recruited into conflicts around the world.

EU policy is set out in the Guidelines on Children and Armed Conflict, as revised in 2008. These aim to persuade Governments and other actors to fully respect international humanitarian law and human rights law which protects children from armed conflict. The Guidelines commit the EU to address the impact of armed conflict on children and to hold accountable those who recruit child soldiers.

The UN Security Council adopted Resolution 1261 on the impact of armed conflict on children in 1999 and since then it has established tools to strengthen child protection and to support international standards, including a systematic and comprehensive monitoring and reporting mechanism.

In December 1996, the UN General Assembly created the mandate of the UN Special Representative for Children and Armed Conflict to advocate for the protection and well-being of children affected by armed conflict and to develop best practices to address the recruitment of child soldiers. The UN Secretary-General also issues an annual report on children and armed conflict which examines both trends and specific country situations, listing all armed groups that recruit and use children.

Ireland is a member of the Group of Friends of Children and Armed Conflict at the United Nations in New York, a network of 47 Member States who support the continued focus on Children and Armed Conflict.

Ireland continues to combat the use of child soldiers through our development programme, Irish Aid, with a focus on addressing the socio-economic causes that contribute to this situation, through providing access to education, skills and livelihood opportunities.

Ireland strongly supports the mandate of the Special Representative of the Secretary General for Children and Armed Conflict and will actively engage in the Children and Armed Conflict Working Group when it assumes membership of the United Nations Security Council (UNSC) in January 2021.

Human Rights

Questions (441)

Bernard Durkan

Question:

441. Deputy Bernard J. Durkan asked the Minister for Foreign Affairs the degree to which he continues to encourage colleagues at EU and UN levels to address the issue of the ever-increasing number of refugees who are forced to risk their lives while attempting improve their quality of life and economic well-being; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [38715/20]

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Written answers (Question to Foreign)

Ireland is a long-standing advocate for these issues, including at the EU and the UN. For example, in 2016, Ireland co-facilitated the UN Summit on Refugees and Migrants. This Summit agreed the New York Declaration, which led to the Global Compact for Refugees and the Global Compact for Safe, Orderly and Regular Migration.

In October, Minister Coveney addressed the Executive Committee of the UNHCR, the UN's refugee agency, underlining Ireland’s strong support for the work it does for displaced persons throughout the world. In 2020, Ireland is providing over €18.5 million in funding to UNHCR, the highest level in more than a decade.

Both within the EU and the UN, a distinction is made between refugees and migrants and it is the latter group whose primary motive is to improve the quality of life and economic well-being. Ireland has repeatedly called for greater solidarity and burden-sharing among EU Member States in dealing with the wider issue of migration.

The conflict in Syria has caused a major refugee and migration crisis. This year Ireland will disburse €25 million in assistance, including support to refugees in neighbouring countries. Ireland is also party to the EU response to the Syria migration crisis, contributing over €38 million. Last month, following the devastating fire in the refugee centre in Lesbos, Greece, Ireland announced a commitment to resettle up to 50 people in families.

Ireland is also working closely with the International Organisation for Migration (IOM), the leading inter-governmental organisation in the field of migration. Our financial support has been increased to €1 million in 2020.

To address some of the causes of irregular mass migration Ireland supports the EU’s Trust Fund for Africa which aims to address irregular migration from Africa by improving employment opportunities and strengthening resilience of communities including refugees and other displaced people. Ireland is the third-highest per capita EU Member State donor with a total contribution of €15.8 million.

Foreign Policy

Questions (442)

Bernard Durkan

Question:

442. Deputy Bernard J. Durkan asked the Minister for Foreign Affairs the degree to which the situation in the western Balkans remains stable and to which the region prepares for EU membership; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [38716/20]

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Written answers (Question to Foreign)

Ireland recognises the value of EU accession as a transformative driver for stability and peace in the Western Balkans. We have always been, and will remain, a strong supporter of enlargement of the European Union, provided that candidate countries meet the necessary conditions for membership. In this regard, we welcome the reform agenda underway in the countries of the Western Balkans and the progress that has been made in the areas of security and rule of law.

In March 2020, EU Member States agreed an enhanced accession methodology, which seeks to make the accession process more credible and dynamic, by clustering together negotiating Chapters and phasing in participation in EU programmes and policies. The enhanced methodology also recognises the need for more decisive measures proportionally sanctioning any serious or prolonged stagnation or even backsliding in reform implementation.

The European Commission published its Annual Enlargement Package and country reports in October 2020. In terms of the progress of individual Western Balkan countries, Serbia and Montenegro are both currently negotiating Chapters of the Acquis with the EU. Serbia has opened negotiations on 18 Chapters, with two provisionally closed. Montenegro has opened all Chapters and provisionally closed three. The country reports for 2020 assessed both Serbia and Montenegro as having both made limited progress. Serbia needs to accelerate its reforms and make significant progress in the normalisation of relations with Kosovo, while Montenegro must address shortcomings in the areas of media freedom, fight against corruption and trafficking, and turn its attention to the closing of Chapters.

Regarding North Macedonia and Albania, it was agreed by the European Council in March 2020 to open negotiations with both countries. It was regrettable that Member States were unable to reach agreement on the draft negotiating frameworks for both countries at the November General Affairs Council. Ireland believes the draft negotiating frameworks should be agreed at the earliest available opportunity to allow the first Intergovernmental Conferences to take place with both countries.

Bosnia-Herzegovina has made limited progress over the last year and faces significant challenges to ensure implementation of the Commission’s 2019 recommendations in the areas of democracy, rule of law, fundamental rights, and public administration reform. Progress in these areas must be seen before the opening of accession negotiations with Bosnia-Herzegovina can be considered.

Kosovo is a potential candidate for Membership of the EU. The Commission’s report on Kosovo in 2020 noted that the political situation in Kosovo remains challenging. Rule of law, judicial reform, public administration reform, organised crime and normalisation of the relationship with Serbia are just some of the areas that must be comprehensively addressed in order for Kosovo to advance on its European path. It will be some time before Kosovo can qualify as a candidate country.

Ireland will continue to support the enlargement process and offer any practical assistance it can to candidate countries engaged in accession negotiations to the EU.

Foreign Policy

Questions (443)

Bernard Durkan

Question:

443. Deputy Bernard J. Durkan asked the Minister for Foreign Affairs the extent to which it is accepted that the rule of law should prevail across all EU and non-EU countries; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [38717/20]

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Written answers (Question to Foreign)

There is no doubt that challenges to the rule of law are present in both EU and non-EU countries, and the rule of law cannot be taken for granted.

Ireland is a firm supporter of the rule of law and the values of the EU enshrined in Article 2 of the Treaty on the European Union. The rule of law is and should remain a fundamental principle that all EU Member States respect, protect and promote, both within and beyond the EU.

Globally, Ireland is committed to a process of effective multilateralism in which the broadly accepted, rules-based international order is respected and developed. Both internationally and at EU level specifically, Ireland has advocated broadly for respect for the rule of law.

We believe that it is important for the EU to have the necessary tools to monitor the rule of law across Member States and to effectively respond to challenges where they arise.

To that end, we strongly support a strong and effective Rule of Law proposal to protect the EU Budget. Once the regime of conditionality is introduced, Ireland will support its fair, proportionate and effective implementation. The introduction of a regime of conditionality would be in addition to an important range of tools available to the EU for monitoring, promoting and enforcing the rule of law.

Among these tools are the ongoing Article 7 proceedings against Hungary and Poland, under which there have been a number of hearings at the General Affairs Council. Ireland has actively participated in these hearings - and will continue to do so - highlighting the importance we attach to respect for the rule of law.

We have also welcomed the publication of the Commission’s first Annual Rule of Law Report, which presents a broad overview of the rule of law situations across Member States and the EU as a whole. It provides a valuable, impartial assessment of both the positive and negative developments relating to rule of law. We look forward to discussing the Irish Chapter of the Report with fellow Member States at a meeting of the General Affairs Council during the Portuguese Presidency in 2021.

Conversations among EU Member States regarding the rule of law can be difficult, and each Member State has its challenges in this area, but it is important for Member States to be willing to engage on these issues. We will remain open to dialogue on the rule of law and we encourage our fellow Member States to do the same.

Foreign Policy

Questions (444)

Bernard Durkan

Question:

444. Deputy Bernard J. Durkan asked the Minister for Foreign Affairs the degree to which the international community continues to assist countries with economic and-or political difficulties in Latin America; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [38718/20]

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Written answers (Question to Foreign)

I am very aware of the multi-faceted economic and political challenges that many countries in Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC) face and the disproportionate affect that COVID-19 has had on the region. Ireland, together with EU partners and others in the international community, continue to support countries in the region to respond effectively to these challenges.

The long-standing partnership between the EU and the LAC region is grounded in shared values and history and a commitment to multilateralism. We share the same vision when it comes to shaping global issues, such as sustainable development, free and fair trade, and the digital revolution.

Relations between the EU and the LAC region were most recently discussed at the Foreign Affairs Council Meeting (FAC) on 12 October and I participated in this discussion. The impact of COVID-19 in the region had also been discussed at the FAC on 13 July. On that occasion, we voiced concern about how the pandemic is compounding difficulties already facing the region, such as inequality, gender issues, democracy and human rights. An EU-LAC Ministerial Meeting is planned for 14 December at which we hope to reaffirm and give new impetus to our strategic partnership.

Ireland, through our six Missions in the region, is active under the ‘Team Europe’ umbrella, which has been providing support to the most vulnerable countries and people most at risk since the outbreak of the pandemic. As of 1 October 2020, €2.44 billion has been made available, so far, to partners in the region under the initiative. The EU is the LAC region’s principal development partner (€3.6 billion provided in grants between 2014 and 2020) and a main provider of humanitarian assistance. The EU also provides support through regional cooperation programmes through the Development Cooperation Instrument. The EU Regional Programme for Latin America (2014-2020) allocated a total of €918 million to the region.

Debt relief is an important tool to assist countries speed up post-COVID recovery and achieve the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). We note that many Middle Income countries, a number of which are in the LAC region, are not eligible for debt relief and are at risk of debt distress. We support efforts to explore ways to help address the debt sustainability challenges that they are facing.

I remain deeply concerned by the serious and deteriorating political, economic, social and humanitarian crisis in Venezuela and the effects of the crisis on neighbouring countries. Ireland has been active in responding to the crisis and since 2019, we have provided almost €2.5m in funding to respond to the needs of migrants and refugees.

The Programme for Government includes a commitment to a whole-of-Government strategy for Latin America and the Caribbean. This Strategy will act as a framework for Ireland’s developing bilateral relations with the region and I look forward to it being finalised and published in the period ahead.

Undocumented Irish in the USA

Questions (445)

Brendan Griffin

Question:

445. Deputy Brendan Griffin asked the Minister for Foreign Affairs his plans to improve the situation for the undocumented Irish in the USA; his views on whether the recent presidential election result is a new opportunity to make progress on the matter; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [38790/20]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Foreign)

The issue of Irish immigration to the US, particularly the status of the undocumented Irish, has been a high priority for successive Governments and continues to be one of my key priorities. Immigration issues have been raised on an ongoing basis in our engagement with the US Administration and political leaders. I have raised these issues in recent contacts with Special Envoy Mick Mulvaney and with the US Ambassador, as well as with members of the US Administration and both Houses of Congress during my visit to Washington D.C. at the end of September.

In the US, our Embassy and Consulates General across the country continue to monitor the situation closely and to engage with US officials on immigration issues, including with US Immigration and Customs Enforcement. They also actively support Irish community groups that provide assistance and information to vulnerable Irish and the undocumented. Many of these community groups are members of the Coalition of Irish Immigration Centers, which receives significant annual funding through the Government’s Emigrant Support Programme for their work. In 2019, over €3m ($3.7m) was allocated to 88 organisations across the US, including those that provide front-line welfare assistance to Irish citizens. Furthermore, and in response to the pandemic, a dedicated COVID-19 Response Fund for Irish Communities Abroad was set up to help these organisations meet the needs of those who are particularly vulnerable.

We maintain close relations with members of Congress and contacts from across the political spectrum, and will continue to seek opportunities to deepen and strengthen our bilateral relations with the incoming administration of President-elect Joe Biden. The President-elect has always been a stalwart friend and supporter of Ireland and we are looking forward to working closely with him and his Administration , as reaffirmed by the Taoiseach during their recent telephone phone call. Post-pandemic, we want to see people-to-people links strengthened and we look forward to working with the new administration, as well as with the United States Congress, across the aisle, to pursue comprehensive immigration reform in the US. Our Embassy and network of Consulates General will continue to monitor the situation and stand ready to engage with any Federal and State initiatives on this issue.

In terms of securing future pathways for immigration, we continue to prioritise the E3 Visa Bill which is currently before the US Senate, having been passed in the House of Representatives. The bill was reintroduced in the House of Representatives by Congressmen Neal and Sensenbrenner in May 2019. If passed, this could allow access to thousands of US visas each year to Irish citizens, providing new opportunities to live and work in the US. While the Covid-19 pandemic has impacted upon the congressional agenda, we hope that, when the circumstances allow, the Bill will also be passed in the Senate. We will continue to explore all available options for securing this.

Data Collection

Questions (446)

Catherine Murphy

Question:

446. Deputy Catherine Murphy asked the Minister for Foreign Affairs the number of data-access requests the Passport Office has made to telecommunications and social media companies here in the past three years to date in 2020 under the Communications (Retention of Data) Act 2011; the number of access requests that were approved and declined by the companies from which the data were requested; and the reason the data were sought. [38853/20]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Foreign)

The Passport Service has made no data access requests to telecom companies and social media companies here in the past three years to date in 2020 under the Communications (Retention of Data) Act 2011.

Overseas Missions

Questions (447)

James Lawless

Question:

447. Deputy James Lawless asked the Minister for Defence if he will make inquiries regarding B Company, 35th Battalion, in Elizabethville in the Congo in 1961 (details supplied); and if he will make a statement on the matter. [38654/20]

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Written answers (Question to Defence)

The service by Irish Defence Forces’ personnel in the Congo was significant and has made a lasting contribution to the history of the Defence Forces and its proud tradition of peacekeeping. The Defence Forces have participated in overseas missions mandated by the UN since 1958. We can be justifiably proud of the fact that they have completed approximately 70,000 individual tours of duty overseas in that time. In that time a total of 7 personnel have received the Military Medal of Gallantry while 90 personnel have been awarded the Distinguished Service Medal for acts relating to service overseas.

The United Nations Operation in Congo was the first peacekeeping mission in which significant numbers of Irish soldiers took part. A total of 6,000 Irish soldiers served in Congo from 1960 to 1964 in various Irish contingents over the course of this long, difficult and complex mission.

In recognition of the service by Defence Forces personnel with ONUC, military medals boards, in accordance with Defence Force Regulations, were convened in 1962 and in 1965 to consider recommendations for meritorious promotions and recommendations relating to the awarding of medals for Gallantry and Distinguished Service.

Due to the unique nature of the events which took place in Jadotville, and the collective efforts of the Irish soldiers involved, the Government committed, as an exceptional step to award a medal known as An Bonn Jadotville or the Jadotville medal to each member of “A” Company, 35th Infantry Battalion, and to the family representatives of deceased members.

In relation to events at Jadotville, I have asked the Chief of Staff to consider whether it is possible, as an exceptional measure, to have a retrospective examination of the events at Jadotville in September 1961 in the context of the award of medals and the possible implications for the integrity of the award of medals system. In response the Chief of Staff has proposed the establishment of an independent group of external experts to consider the entire case and evidence, including new evidence, if any, available. Once established, this Independent Group of External Experts will examine the events specific to Jadotville and will independently report its findings and recommendations to the Chief of Staff. The Chief of Staff will then make recommendations to my Office.

It is not proposed to extend the scope of review to other UN operations in Congo.

There are awards made to all personnel who serve on overseas missions, which aim to recognize the contribution made by the members of each contingent serving on the peacekeeping mission and the difficult circumstances in which they have to operate. In this regard, personnel received both a United Nations Medal, for their service in the Congo, awarded by the UN and the United Nations Peacekeeping medal awarded by the Irish Government.

Notwithstanding the awards which were issued as a result of the involvement of the Irish Defence Forces with ONUC, the significant efforts of all Irish soldiers who served in this mission are valued and appreciated. They have left a substantial legacy in the context of Irish peacekeeping efforts.

Housing Issues

Questions (448)

Patricia Ryan

Question:

448. Deputy Patricia Ryan asked the Minister for Defence the action he will take to assist the overholding residents of a location (details supplied); and if he will make a statement on the matter. [37786/20]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Defence)

The provision of housing for members of the public is a matter in the first instance for the Minister for Housing, Local Government and Heritage and my Department assists in any way it can in support of such applications for housing assistance, when requested to do so.

Currently, there are six properties being overheld at O’Higgins Terrace, the Curragh Camp. My Department seeks to continue to regularise Overholding cases without recourse to legal action where possible.

The Deputy can be assured that my Department will continue to resolve matters relating to the properties in a sensitive manner, particularly those properties that may be occupied by vulnerable persons.

Public Procurement Contracts

Questions (449)

Carol Nolan

Question:

449. Deputy Carol Nolan asked the Minister for Defence the details of contracts of €25,000 or more than have been awarded by his Department or bodies under the aegis of his Department that were found to be non-compliant with procurement guidelines from 1 January 2019 to date; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [37793/20]

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Written answers (Question to Defence)

In 2019, total Non-Pay Expenditure by my Department was some €248m. I am advised that my Department complied with the guidelines for all purchases with the exception of five contracts (in excess of €25,000) totalling €161,297 (excluding VAT) relating to various services contracts, which were extended beyond their original contract terms. Each of these five contracts have been reviewed by my Department, and steps are being taken to bring each of these contracts into compliance with the relevant competitive procurement rules as quickly as possible.

My Department seeks to ensure that there is an appropriate focus on good practice and I am satisfied that overall my Department has appropriate governance arrangements in place to ensure on-going compliance and adherence with procurement guidelines.

Information relating to 2020 contracts will not be available until year end activities have been completed and the Comptroller and Auditor General has conducted the audit of the 2020 Appropriation Accounts.

Air Traffic Control Services

Questions (450)

Aengus Ó Snodaigh

Question:

450. Deputy Aengus Ó Snodaigh asked the Minister for Defence the number of times an aircraft (details supplied) landed at Baldonnel between 1 January 2000 and 1 August 2008; the dates and times of same; the dates the aircraft stayed overnight at Baldonnel; and the reason for the visits. [37859/20]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Defence)

The historical information sought by the Deputy is not readily available within the time frame sought. My Department has requested the military authorities to commence a search and retrieval of same. I will arrange to have this information forwarded to the Deputy as soon as it is available.

Legislative Process

Questions (451)

Carol Nolan

Question:

451. Deputy Carol Nolan asked the Minister for Defence the details of all applications made by his Department to the Oireachtas Business Committee to waive pre-legislative scrutiny of primary and secondary legislation sponsored or initiated by his Department from 1 January 2017 to date; the outcomes of such applications; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [37890/20]

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Written answers (Question to Defence)

There have been no applications from my Department to the Oireachtas Business Committee to waive pre-legislative scrutiny in respect of legislation sponsored or initiated since 1 January 2017.

My Department since 2017 to date has submitted one piece of legislation for pre-legislative scrutiny.

The general scheme of the Defence (Amendment) Bill was referred to the Committee on Foreign Affairs and Trade and Defence on 11 October 2018 for consideration as to whether pre-legislative scrutiny was appropriate in this case. The Committee reverted to my Department on 28 February 2019 advising that the Heads of the Bill were considered and the Committee agreed not to proceed with Pre-Legislative Scrutiny.

Legislation from the Department of Defence is generally focused on the Defence Forces only and does not apply to the ordinary citizen or business.

Departmental Staff

Questions (452)

Patrick Costello

Question:

452. Deputy Patrick Costello asked the Minister for Defence the grade at which the chief data protection officer in his Department is employed. [37920/20]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Defence)

The officer with responsibility for fulfilling Data Protection Officer duties in my Department is employed at the grade of Higher Executive Officer.

Tribunals of Inquiry

Questions (453)

John McGuinness

Question:

453. Deputy John McGuinness asked the Minister for Defence the number of tribunals, inquiries or investigations being undertaken currently by his Department; the number that are in the process of being set up; the number in which the terms of reference are not complete or not agreed; the cost of all to date; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [38036/20]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Defence)

There are currently no tribunals being undertaken by my Department. One enquiry is in the process of being set up (the terms of reference are not complete or agreed). Two investigations have recently been established.

No costs have been incurred to date in respect of these matters.

Army Barracks

Questions (454)

Sorca Clarke

Question:

454. Deputy Sorca Clarke asked the Minister for Defence the number of Army barracks in Ireland; and the staffing levels and capacity of each, in tabular form. [38170/20]

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Written answers (Question to Defence)

The overall Defence property portfolio consists of a diverse range of facilities from conventional military barracks to forts, camps and training lands. The following is a list of the 12 permanently occupied Defence Forces installations in which the Army is located across the State:

- Collins Barracks, Cork

- Finner Camp, Ballyshannon, Co. Donegal

- Cathal Brugha Barracks, Rathmines, Dublin 6

- McKee Barracks, Dublin 7

- St. Bricin’s Hospital, Dublin 7

- Defence Forces Training Centre, Curragh Camp, Co. Kildare

- Sarsfield Barracks, Limerick

- Aiken Barracks, Dundalk, Co. Louth

- Gormanston Camp, Gormanston, Co. Meath

- Custume Barracks, Athlone, Co. Westmeath

- Stephens Barracks, Kilkenny

- Dún Ui Mhaoilíosa (Renmore) Barracks, Galway

In addition, the Naval Base, Haulbowline, Co. Cork and Casement Aerodrome, Baldonnel, Dublin 22 are also permanently occupied military installations.

For operational and security reasons, personnel numbers located at specified military installations are not divulged. It is important to note that the number of personnel stationed at any particular barracks will vary on an on-going basis, as it is a normal operational feature for there to be a constant through-flow of personnel into and out of such installations.

Naval Service

Questions (455)

Sorca Clarke

Question:

455. Deputy Sorca Clarke asked the Minister for Defence the number of naval bases in Ireland; and the staffing levels and capacity of each, in tabular form. [38171/20]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Defence)

There is one Naval Base in the State which is located at Haulbowline, Co. Cork.

Within an overall Permanent Defence Force establishment of 9,500 personnel, the establishment for the Naval Service is set at 1,094.

In addition, the Naval Service Reserve operates from four locations; Cork, Dublin, Limerick and Waterford, and comprises a total establishment of 200 personnel.

Army Barracks

The following deferred reply was received under Standing Order 51

Questions (456, 457, 458)

Sorca Clarke

Question:

456. Deputy Sorca Clarke asked the Minister for Defence the number of Army barracks that provide living quarters. [38172/20]

View answer

Sorca Clarke

Question:

457. Deputy Sorca Clarke asked the Minister for Defence the occupancy of the Army barracks that provide living quarters. [38173/20]

View answer

Sorca Clarke

Question:

458. Deputy Sorca Clarke asked the Minister for Defence the last time there was a vacancy in the living quarters provided by the Defence Forces. [38174/20]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Defence)

I propose to take Questions Nos. 456 to 458, inclusive, together.

The general provision of housing quarters to serving personnel is no longer undertaken. This has been a long standing established policy since the late 1990's to withdraw from the provision of housing quarters for Defence Forces personnel. Provision is made for accommodation for serving personnel where same is required for operational and training purposes, principally through the provision of Single Living In (SLI) accommodation. Details in relation to such accommodation is not readily available in the format sought by the Deputy. My Department has requested these details from the military authorities and as soon as this material is received, I will arrange to have same forwarded to the Deputy.

The following deferred reply was received under Standing Order 51
The attached sets out the most recent material available to my Department based on returns received from the military authorities in relation to the provision of Single Living In accommodation for military personnel as at 30 November 2020.
Single-Living-In accommodation is provided in every permanently occupied military installation.  It is provided for long term and transient use.  As such, military personnel can use accommodation for overnight stays during training and courses. The occupancy of SLI accommodation therefore can fluctuate on a daily basis, depending on location, the number of courses being held in a location and the duration of the course.
The most recent figures available from the military in relation to occupancy at each of the above locations are shown in the table below.  You may wish to note that the number of available beds are reduced due to COVID 19 restrictions.

Location Unit/Barracks

Total Number of Beds

Number of Occupied Beds

Collins Barracks, Cork

94

94

1 Cn Cois, Galway

269

144

3 Bn, Kilkenny

131

131

12 Bn, Limerick

176

113

Cathal Brugha

140

131

McKee Barracks

131

108

Gormanstown Camp

178

3

Aiken Barracks

181

125

Finner Camp

193

83

Custume Barracks

190

182

DFTC

867

144

Naval Service

86

5

Air Corp

244

161