Ceisteanna—Questions. Oral Answers. - Civil Service Appointments.

asked the Minister for Finance whether, since 13th June, 1951, any persons have been appointed to permanent or temporary posts in the Civil Service otherwise than by open competition under the auspices of the Civil Service Commission; and, if so, whether he will state (a) the names and addresses of such persons; (b) the posts to which they have been appointed; (c) the salaries attached to such posts; (d) in the case of female appointees whether they are married or single, and (e) the positions held by them immediately prior to the date of their appointment to their present post.

The information requested by the Deputy is in the form of a tabular statement which, with the permission of the Ceann Comhairle, I shall have circulated with the Official Report.

The statement is as follows:—

(a)

(b)

(c)

(d)

(e)

Names and addresses of persons concerned

Posts to which they have been appointed

Salaries attaching to the posts referred to at (b)

In the case of female appointees whether married or single

Positions held by the persons concerned immediately prior to the date of their appointment to their present posts

Miss Catherine O'Connell, 22 Elgin Road, Dublin.

Personal Secretary to the Taoiseach.

£709-£28-£890 plus a temporary allowance of £96 a year.

Single

Secretary to former Leader of Opposition.

Seán Pádraig O hAnnracháin, 60 Harcourt Street, Dublin.

Private Secretary to the Parliamentary Secretary to the Government.

£550 a year inclusive

Member of staff of former Leader of Opposition and Opposition Whips.

Miss Harriet Behan, 49 Pembroke Road, Dublin.

Private Secretary to the Parliamentary Secretary to the Taoiseach.

£500 a year inclusive

Single

Member of Staff of former Leader of Opposition and Opposition Whips.

Miss Anne Donnelly, Cadamstown House, Birr, Offaly.

Substitute Teacher of Dairying, Munster Institute.

£2 13s. 9d. a week plus free board and lodgings.

Single

These officers were attending a course of training for Instructors in Poultry Keeping and Dairying in the Munster Institute.

Miss Muriel Berry, 7 Wigan Road, Glasnevin, Dublin.

do.

do.

Single

All the appointments set out above, with the exception of that of Miss Catherine O'Connell, have been made to posts temporarily added since 13th June, 1951, to the Schedule to the Civil Service Regulation Act, 1924. Miss O'Connell was appointed Personal Secretary to the Taoiseach pursuant to Section 6 (2) of the Civil Service Regulation Act, 1924, as amended by Section 3 of the Civil Service Regulation (Amendment) Act, 1926.

I am assuming that the Deputy does not require particulars of (1) persons appointed to posts permanently scheduled under the Civil Service Regulation Act, 1924, (2) persons appointed to posts temporarily added to the Schedule to that Act prior to 13th June, 1951 (including posts which were first added to the Schedule before that date and the period of scheduling of which has since been extended), (3) reinstated widows, (4) reinstated officers who had resigned from the Civil Service to enter ecclesiastical seminaries or religious orders or (5) persons first appointed to the Civil Service before 13th June, 1951, and promoted or transferred since that date.

asked the Minister for Finance how many new entrants or reentrants to the Civil Service have been recruited since June 13th, 1951, for service in the offices of Ministers and Parliamentary Secretaries, and in respect of each entrant or re-entrant (a) name and (b) salary scale and incremental stage on scale at which he or she was admitted.

The information requested by the Deputy is in the form of a tabular statement which, with the permission of the Ceann Comhairle, will be circulated with the Official Report.

The statement is as follows:—

Three such officers have been recruited, viz.,

Name

Rates of Pay

(1) Miss Catherine O'Connell

Salary Scale:—£709—28— £890. Commencing Salary: £881 a year, being the present equivalent of her 1948 salary. She is also in receipt of a temporary allowance of £96 a year.

(2) Mr. Seán Pádraig Ó hAnnracháin

£550 a year fixed.

(3) Miss Harriet Behan

£500 a year fixed.

asked the Minister for Finance if the former personal secretary to the Taoiseach has secured an appointment from the Government in the Civil Service; and, if so, whether he will state the salary and expenses attached to the post and other conditions of employment, whether it is temporary or otherwise, the pension it carries and the date of the appointment.

The person referred to in the Deputy's question has been appointed to the established post of personal secretary to the Taoiseach with effect as from 19th June, 1951. The scale of salary for the post, as calculated in accordance with the recent revision of Civil Service pay, is £709 by increments of £28 to £890, to which is added the customary allowance of £96 per annum paid for private secretarial duties. The other conditions of employment are the normal conditions of Civil Service tenure and the post is pensionable under the Superannuation Acts, 1834 to 1947.

In effect, the person referred to in the Deputy's question has been reinstated in her former post on the same terms and conditions as she would have enjoyed had there been no interruption in her service in that post, except that the period of her absence will not count for pension purposes.

Is it not a fact that the person to whom the question refers retired on medical grounds from the Civil Service? Will the Minister say whether or not he has now requested a medical certificate in connection with her reinstatement to the Civil Service and, if so, whether that medical certificate is in accordance with the terms required to be filled by every civil servant if he or she is being reappointed to a position from which he or she resigned through ill-health?

The person referred to in the question is a person who possesses a certificate of military service during the Black-and-Tan war, which the Deputy will never have.

I propose to raise this matter on the Adjournment in view of the insulting reply.

I will consider the matter.

I could not expect anything else, I suppose, from the Minister.

If the Deputy regards it as insulting not to have fought in the Black-and-Tan war that does not matter.

The Deputy was not born then.