GOVERNOR-GENERAL'S TELEGRAM.

AN CATHAOIRLEACH

The only other business is a notice in the name of Senator Colonel Moore. I will be compelled, I am afraid, to rule it out of order, and I want Colonel Moore to understand why I do so. It is quite natural he should have put this down in its existing form, but if he looks at the Standing Orders, under which we are at present working, he will find that a Standing Order has been expressly framed to avoid discussions of what I may call a barren nature —discussions on things that lead to nothing. In other words, he will find a Standing Order which provides that every motion must take the form of a resolution, and it must ask the Seanad to resolve something. It is not to be merely sterile, and it is not to call for a mere expression of views; it is to ask the Seanad to take action in some respect. That is the object of that Standing Order, and as long as we have that, this motion of Colonel Moore's contravenes it. It does not ask for any action, or suggest the passing of any resolution. It simply says he wishes to call attention to certain things.

If you rule in that way, I do not think it is really necessary to waste time in looking through the Standing Order. On another occasion I will introduce the matter in a new proposal. I think it is a very important matter. We are at the beginning of our Parliamentary work, and it is very important that we should insist on certain words and forms of words.

AN CATHAOIRLEACH

Standing Order 62 of the Orders that we have adopted, pro tem, deals with this particular matter. A matter can be only brought before the Seanad at present either by resolution or by introducing a Bill. It would be quite possible for you to frame this matter so as to bring yourself within the Standing Orders.