Aftercare Services

Question No. 79 answered with Question No. 76.

Questions (78)

Seán Sherlock

Question:

78. Deputy Sean Sherlock asked the Minister for Children and Youth Affairs the number of young adults engaging with the aftercare service; and the estimated number of children in care at 16 years of age identified as likely requiring the services of aftercare teams on turning 18 years of age in each of the years 2020 to 2022. [29937/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Children)

Each year, approximately 500 young people leave care on reaching 18 years of age. 

At the end of Q4 2018, the most recent date for which data has been published, there were a total of 2,496 young people receiving aftercare supports from Tusla, the Child and Family Agency. 64% were in education or training, and 78% had an aftercare plan.

Of the young people who had been assessed as needing an allocated social worker, 92% have had one allocated. 

A new set of metrics have been developed by Tusla to reflect the Child Care (Amendment) Act 2015, and the revised Tusla Aftercare Policy. Reporting on the new metrics commenced in Q2 2018, and are available on Tusla's website.  The new data indicates that 393 referrals were reported for aftercare from Q2 to Q4 2018.

I have asked Tusla whether it is possible to provide the estimates in the format requested by the Deputy.

Question No. 79 answered with Question No. 76.

Area Based Childhood Programme

Questions (80)

John Curran

Question:

80. Deputy John Curran asked the Minister for Children and Youth Affairs the status of progress made in disadvantaged communities through the ABC programme and the prevention, partnership and family support programme; and if she will make a statement on the matter. [29746/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Children)

The Area Based Childhood (ABC) Programme is a prevention and early intervention initiative targeting investment in effective services to improve the outcomes for children and families living in a number of specific areas of disadvantage.  

Established in 2013 in line with the commitment in the Programme for Government to adopt an area-based approach to tackling child poverty, the ABC Programme was designed as a time-bound, co-funding agreement led by the Department of Children and Youth Affairs (DCYA) in conjunction with The Atlantic Philanthropies, originally in the amount of €29.7m for the period 2013-2017. As of 31 December 2018, the total funding provided to the ABC Programme was €38.7m. Of this, €23.85m was provided by DCYA and €14.85m by The Atlantic Philanthropies. With the closure of The Atlantic Philanthropies operations in Ireland, DCYA is now the sole funder of the ABC Programme. 

In November 2017, my Department initiated a process, in consultation with key ABC Programme stakeholders, to consider options for sustaining the work of the ABC Programme within a new vision for a community based prevention and early intervention programme from 2019 and beyond. Following these consultations, the decision was taken to transfer the current ABC Programme to Tusla from September 2019 as part of the national Prevention, Partnership and Family Support Programme (PPFS). For 2019, a budget of €9.5m has been allocated to the ABC and PPFS Programmes.  €8.2m has been ring-fenced for the ABC Programme in 2019. A further €1.3m has been allocated for the PPFS Programme which will include two new national roles to support the ABC Programme.

The Development and Mainstreaming Programme for Prevention, Partnership and Family Support (PPFS) is a programme of action being undertaken by Tusla, the Child and Family Agency, as part of its National Service Delivery Framework. The programme seeks to strengthen and develop Tusla’s prevention, early intervention and family support services.

PPFS was subject to an evaluation study by the UNESCO Child and Family Research Centre at NUI Galway, published in September 2018. The evaluation found that Tusla is developing a greater focus on prevention and that the agency’s organisational culture is increasingly inclusive of families, in line with the vision for PPFS. PPFS is currently undertaking a review process to ensure it delivers the best possible prevention and early intervention programme for children, young people and their families in the future, and to enhance the connectivity and alignment with the ABC programme as it completes its transition into Tusla.

In addition, a working group was established in May 2018 to support the transition into this new national structure that can build on the achievements to date in both the ABC and PPFS Programmes, and strengthen Tusla’s prevention and early intervention operations. This working group held its eighth meeting on 25 June 2019.

As part of this national structure, the ABC Programme will take a renewed focus on addressing child poverty and inform the delivery of prevention and early intervention initiatives, improving the lives of children and families throughout Ireland. In recognition of the need to further develop this mandate, research is being led locally and nationally by the Child and Family Research Centre to explore the potential of the ABC programme operation into the future in the context of the new organisational structure and the expectation that the programme will renew its emphasis on tackling child poverty. The outputs from this will include a document to inform the longer-term development of the ABC programme and a set of local area reports to guide future operation of the ABCs locally within their new organisational context.

Data Sharing Arrangements

Questions (81)

Seán Sherlock

Question:

81. Deputy Sean Sherlock asked the Minister for Children and Youth Affairs the reason the client identification service has been halted; when it will be rectified under the Data Protection Act 2018; and when co-operation will be re-established between agencies. [29935/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Children)

I am assuming that the question relates to the cooperation between Client Identity Services of the Department of Employment Affairs and Social Protection and both Tusla and the Adoption Authority of Ireland for the purposes of information and tracing services.

I became aware earlier this year that the Department of Employment Affairs and Social Protection had notified both Tusla and the AAI that the CIS could no longer assist in processing data for those agencies, on the basis that there was no statutory basis to do so.  I engaged with my colleague, Minister Doherty, in an effort to have this service re-installed, and a meeting took place at official level.  My understanding of the position of that Department is that the co-operation cannot be re-established until the data sharing is underpinned in statute.  The Adoption (Information and Tracing) Bill 2016 contains provisions to allow the sharing of data of third parties, for the purposes of information and tracing, and the enactment of that Bill will be the solution to the current difficulties.

I am aware of the impact of the cessation of cooperation from the CIS on current information and tracing services.  This in my view adds to the urgency attached to the enactment of the Information and Tracing Bill, and Deputies will be aware of my on-going efforts to reach consensus on that Bill, to allow it progress to enactment.

I would like to put on record my appreciation of the cooperation and assistance of the Department of Employment Affairs and Social Protection to date.  I recognise that compliance with GDPR obligations is the reason that the current service has had to been discontinued, hopefully on a temporary basis, and I look forward to the service resuming when the necessary statutory safeguards are in place.

Residential Institutions Redress Scheme

Questions (82)

Joan Burton

Question:

82. Deputy Joan Burton asked the Minister for Children and Youth Affairs her plans to address the issues of the former residents of the Bethany Homes; and if she will make a statement on the matter. [29383/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Children)

At their request, I have held a number of meetings with former residents of Bethany Home and their advocates in recent weeks. I welcomed the opportunity to engage and listen to the experiences and frustrations of those in attendance.

I was delighted to accept an invitation to visit the memorial in Mount Jerome Cemetery to the children who died in the Bethany Home.

One of the key issues raised by Bethany survivors is their desire for immediate access to a fast tracked financial redress scheme for the benefit of Bethany Home survivors.

At the meetings, there was discussion around the 2002 Residential Institutions Redress Scheme and the various calls for it to be re-opened and extended. I explained that the decision not to extend the Scheme has been reviewed by this and previous Governments without change.

I understand the disappointment and anger regarding this decision.

Bethany Home was one of the first institutions identified for inclusion when the scope of the investigation by the Commission of Investigation was being decided and its specific terms of reference were informed by concerns in relation to the care and welfare of children in this institution.

Given that these specific matters have not been central to any previous inquiry, it is not feasible at this interim stage in the Commission's work, to pre-empt its findings and recommendations. Its final report is due to be completed by February 2020. 

In the interim I am committed to on-going engagement with former residents of these institutions. I have engaged with the community of former residents, their families and advocates on this issue and I established the Collaborative Forum. Bethany Home survivors are represented in the membership of the Forum. The recommendations of the Forum have recently been published and Government has committed to advancing a number of measures in response to identified issues of concern.

Early Childhood Care and Education Funding

Question No. 84 answered with Question No. 77

Questions (83)

Niamh Smyth

Question:

83. Deputy Niamh Smyth asked the Minister for Children and Youth Affairs the status of funding for the provision of supports for special needs children; and if she will make a statement on the matter. [29375/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Children)

Officials in my Department were in contact with the Deputy's office, and I understand that the question specifically relates to supports for children with special needs to take part in school-age childcare.

My Department does not currently provide such supports. The Deputy may be aware that AIM - the Access and Inclusion Model - provides both universal and targeted supports for the meaningful participation of children with disabilities in the ECCE pre-school programme. The third year of AIM's operation is just ending, and work on a 3-year evaluation of AIM will shortly commence. A review at the end of the first year of AIM, conducted by external consultants, was very positive, and indeed AIM has won a number of national awards.

The Government made a commitment in First 5 to consider enhancements to, or extension of, AIM to other groups of children. Such an extension might involve younger children (such as under-3s) or children attending school-age childcare services, or it might involve children with additional needs other than a disability. However, any decisions on extension or reform of AIM will depend on the findings of the 3-year evaluation, other relevant developments, and the securing of necessary resources.

The Deputy may also be interested to know that on 21st May I launched a public consultation on the future regulation and quality standards for school-age childcare, and this consultation ended last week. The consultation included an open call for submissions, an online survey, a focus group session with school-age service providers, and an Open Policy Debate with a wide range of stakeholders. The consultation has provided rich information for consideration by my Department, and the findings may provide additional input into consideration of future supports for accessing school-age childcare.

Question No. 84 answered with Question No. 77.

Affordable Childcare Scheme

Question No. 86 answered with Question No. 71

Questions (85, 88, 90)

Denise Mitchell

Question:

85. Deputy Denise Mitchell asked the Minister for Children and Youth Affairs the status of the national childcare scheme; her plans to ensure low income families availing of targeted supports will not be negatively affected by the roll out of the scheme; and if she will make a statement on the matter. [29680/19]

View answer

Thomas P. Broughan

Question:

88. Deputy Thomas P. Broughan asked the Minister for Children and Youth Affairs her plans to ensure that no lone parent or low income family will lose money due to changes to the childcare scheme she is planning to introduce; and if she will make a statement on the matter. [29382/19]

View answer

Anne Rabbitte

Question:

90. Deputy Anne Rabbitte asked the Minister for Children and Youth Affairs the status of the implementation of the affordable childcare scheme. [29822/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Children)

I propose to take Questions Nos. 85, 88 and 90 together.

The National Childcare Scheme is fundamental to delivering quality, accessible, affordable childcare to families throughout Ireland.

I am pleased to say that we are making good progress on the development of the Scheme. Many of the major elements are now in place in preparation for the Scheme’s opening in October 2019.

Following the enactment of the Childcare Support Act 2018, detailed secondary legislation and policy guidelines are now being finalised for my approval and signature. 

I have formally appointed Pobal as Scheme Administrator under section 3 of the Act.  This has enabled Pobal to open a Parent Phoneline.  The phoneline is now available to assist parents or guardians with any queries on the new National Childcare Scheme.

Providers have been invited to sign-up for the Scheme and I am delighted that, to date, over 2,300 have done so.

A national communications campaign is underway.  As part of this, my Department launched a dedicated website, which has received over 185,000 hits, and distributed over 60,000 parent information booklets nationwide.  It also delivered a nationwide training programme to over 3,500 Early Years professionals. 

In September and October, my Department will undertake further training for providers and will run a large multimedia information campaign to ensure parents are aware of their potential entitlements. 

Of course the development of the Scheme is highly complex and has thrown up challenges.  This would be expected with a scheme of this size which will benefit so many families across Ireland.

We are designing a highly innovative supporting IT system for the Scheme so that we have the option of a user-friendly, paperless, automated assessment process for parents.  While the main IT system to deal with online applications is largely built, work is continuing on the supporting structures to deal with postal applications. With this in mind the experts overseeing development of the Scheme have recommended a phased launch approach.  

In accordance with the expert advice, we are working towards delivery online, on time, in October.  The paper based system will be available in January for those who do not wish to apply online. 

I believe that this is the best way to proceed, so that the maximum number of parents can benefit from the new scheme at the earliest possible date.  

The Deputy has also asked about supporting low income parents.   

The National Childcare Scheme will greatly increase the number of families who can access financial support. The Scheme removes many of the restrictive eligibility requirements of the existing support programmes, whereby a parent must be in receipt of certain Social Protection payments or a Medical Card in order to receive targeted supports. In this way, it aims to combat the poverty traps which may exist within the existing schemes, and to incentivise work and training or education for those parents who can engage in same.  

Many parents will see an increase to the level of subsidy they currently receive. For example, a family with a child aged two in full-time care (40 hours) and currently benefiting from the maximum subsidy of €145 per week under CCS Band A, would see their subsidy increase to €174 per week, an additional subsidisation of €1,500 per annum. 

I have also worked to poverty-proof the Scheme by ensuring that families at or below the relative income poverty line will benefit from the highest subsidy rates under the Scheme. Indeed, international reports have stated that the Scheme will significantly address affordability for lower income families, with analysis showing that Ireland will, for example, change from being the most expensive country in the OECD for childcare for lone parents, to 11th  position.

Finally, arrangements are also in place to ensure that no one loses out in the initial transition to the new Scheme. Once the National Childcare Scheme launches, families can choose to switch over to the new Scheme or can continue to access their current targeted supports (i.e. effectively remain on their current payment) until the end of August 2020. My Department has committed to a review of the scheme one year after its commencement,and again at three years, but we will be closely monitoring the scheme and its impact on families from day one.

Question No. 86 answered with Question No. 71.

Family Support Services

Question No. 88 answered with Question No. 85

Questions (87)

Niamh Smyth

Question:

87. Deputy Niamh Smyth asked the Minister for Children and Youth Affairs the steps she is taking to support stay-at-home parents; and if she will make a statement on the matter. [29376/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Children)

Government is committed to supporting parents in caring for young children at home in a range of ways. 

Within my remit as Minister for Children and Youth Affairs, the policy priorities are to provide access to high quality and affordable Early Learning and Care (ELC) and School-Age Childcare (SAC), whether parents work or are in education full time or part time, or look after their children at home full-time. These policies seek to support children’s optimal development, to support families, and to ensure that families can choose options to best suit their needs and preferences. 

All children are eligible to avail of two years of universal pre-school, without cost.  Almost 108,000 children are currently participating, many of whom are children of stay-at-home parents. 

Current targeted ELC and SAC subsidy schemes are available to families where parents are in receipt of certain social welfare payments, medical cards, or GP Visit cards, many of whom are stay-at-home parents. 

A universal subsidy is available to all parents of children from six months until their child becomes eligible for universal pre-school, regardless of whether parents are working outside the home or not. The National Childcare Scheme which will be open for applications later this year will make subsidies available on the basis of family income and will also be available to stay-at-home parents. 

My Department also provides funding for parent and toddler groups to organise activities for parents and children in the community to support their development through play. Both working parents and stay-at-home parents participate.  449 groups were supported in 2018. 

My Department is also developing a new model of parenting services covering key stages of child development and taking account of parents and children in a range of contexts and parenting relationships. 

More widely across Government, there are various initiatives that support stay-at-home parents. A child benefit payment of €140 per child per month is available for all children. Budget 2019 announced an increase to the home carer tax credit to €1,500 per year. 

There have also been a number of new measures to support parents to spend time at home with children in their early years. Two weeks of paternity leave and benefit for fathers was introduced in 2016. In 2017, there was an extension to maternity leave and benefit to mothers of babies born prematurely.  Budget 2019 announced the introduction of a new paid parental leave scheme which will be available to both fathers and mothers from later this year.   

First 5, a Whole-of-Government Strategy for Babies, Young Children and their Families, published in November 2018, includes over 150 actions including a broad a range of measures to support families given their fundamental importance in shaping children’s experiences and outcomes. The First 5 Implementation Plan, published in May, sets out how these actions, many of which will benefit stay-at-home parents, will be progressed in the coming three years.   

Question No. 88 answered with Question No. 85.

Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services

Question No. 90 answered with Question No. 85.

Questions (89)

Éamon Ó Cuív

Question:

89. Deputy Éamon Ó Cuív asked the Minister for Children and Youth Affairs the discussion she has had with the Minister for Health or Ministers of State in relation to youth mental health challenges in view of the high rate of youth suicide; the co-ordinated steps being taken by both Departments to try reducing the incidence of youth suicide and self-harm; and if she will make a statement on the matter. [29378/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Children)

I share the Deputy's concern regarding the issue of youth mental health; and indeed it is a subject that needs to be tackled through a whole of society response - one that includes the statutory, voluntary and community sectors.

While this is an issue that is led by the Department of Health, I recognise that other departments and agencies are critical in supporting the Department of Health as part of a concerted response to address the area of youth mental health. As such, and following collaboration with Minister Daly, who has responsibility for this brief, both departments established a Working Group in 2018 to scope connectivity in the area of youth mental health. 

The group is made up of senior officials from both Departments with representatives from Tusla, the Child and Family Agency and the Health Service Executive.

The key objective of the working group is to examine psychological and mental health services for children and young people with the aim of agreeing a clearer continuum of provision and strengthening alignment between providers. 

In order to secure the best possible output it is essential to establish complete and up-to-date information on current provision. My officials have been working with Tusla to establish greater clarity around existing service availability and provision, with a view to ensuring that all respective inputs from the agencies provide a comprehensive overview of provision in this area. Under the Child and Family Agency Act, 2013 Tusla has responsibility for services relating to the psychological welfare of children and families but not for more acute services focusing on complex developmental issues and disabilities and more severe mental health problems. Community-based psychological services are delivered by the HSE with financial support from Tusla. Tusla also deliver specific psychological services through the Assessment Consultation Therapy Service (ACTS). ACTS provides multidisciplinary consultation, assessment and focused interventions to young people with complex needs.

Tusla and the HSE have in place both a Memorandum of Understanding and a Joint Protocol for inter-agency collaboration among the two organisations. Discussions are ongoing between the two organisations to ensure collaboration is effective and sustained.

A key initiative that will inform the further advancement of the work of the group is the Youth Mental Health Pathfinder Project, being led by the Department of Health. The operationalisation and resourcing of this Pathfinder Project is, I understand, currently under consideration by the Department of Expenditure and Reform. As this project represents the key development to ensure and enhance a robust response to support youth mental health, it is important that the work of the Working Group and indeed our respective departments align with this initiative. It is anticipated that the work advanced to date by the Working Group will directly inform the work of the Pathfinder Project and its programme of work. Centralising the work in this way will provide a clear overview of existing provision and proposed plans from across the relevant departments and agencies so as to identify gaps in provision, areas of alignment and areas for further development. 

My Department, in conjunction with the Department of Health and with colleagues in our respective agencies, will continue to support efforts in addressing this crucial issue in a strategic and collaborative response, with the key aim of ensuring aligned and accessible youth mental health policy and service provision.

Question No. 90 answered with Question No. 85.

Children in Care

Questions (91)

Denise Mitchell

Question:

91. Deputy Denise Mitchell asked the Minister for Children and Youth Affairs if she is satisfied that residential centres for vulnerable children are adequately staffed and resourced; and if she will make a statement on the matter. [29683/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Children)

Approximately 6 % of  the 5,989 children in care in Ireland live in residential settings. In April 2019 this amounted to  370 young people.  Individual residential settings care for  small numbers of children, often no more than two or three.

All centres are inspected against the relevant standards and regulations and  the majority of inspections show evidence of positive relationships between staff and young people, and that the needs of the young people being met.  In addition, Tulsa registers private centres and conditions are placed on the registration of private centres who fall below the standards expected, for instance the number of children in the centre.  Centres that are struggling to meet standards do not survive in such a regulated environment.

The Deputy asks about staffing and resourcing in residential centres. I have been concerned to learn that in some centres there is a high turnover of staff and a dependency on agency staff. I am also aware of injuries sustained by some staff in the course of their work and the impact this has on stability in the centre.

Residential care is a small, but vital part of our care system and the basis for successful outcomes for the young people who live in residential settings relies on the experience, quality and resilience of the management and staff group in each centre. 

My officials have been engaged with Tusla on the challenges posed in residential care and work is ongoing to provide a greater level of assessment and therapeutic input to the centres from the ACTS Team (Assessment, Counselling, Therapy and Support Team).

 I also welcome CORU's upcoming accreditation of Social Care Courses and registration of Social Care Workers, as I believe this will lead to the enhancement of professional social care as the lead profession in working with troubled young people. 

Adoption Legislation

Questions (92)

Maureen O'Sullivan

Question:

92. Deputy Maureen O'Sullivan asked the Minister for Children and Youth Affairs if her attention has been drawn to complaints made by natural parents regarding invasion of privacy in relation to an adopted person seeking contact with the natural parent; the way in which she can address these concerns; and if she will make a statement on the matter. [29958/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Children)

I have received a considerable amount of correspondence on the issue of the Adoption (Information and Tracing) Bill 2016, including from natural parents and people who were adopted as children. If the Deputy has a specific case in mind I would encourage them to send any relevant correspondence on to me.

I am aware that there are cases where natural parents have concerns about invasion of privacy in the context of an adopted person seeking contact. In particular I am conscious of cases where natural mothers fear that they will have no say as to whether they could be contacted.  

It is important to bear in mind that the Adoption (Information and Tracing) Bill 2016 is concerned with individual’s access to information, rather than establishing contact between people. Notwithstanding this, the Adoption (information and Tracing) Bill 2016 recognises that there can be a conflict between the right to privacy of one party, and the right to information on the part of another. The Bill seeks to balance these rights. I have engaged at length with the Attorney General on this very issue.  

The Deputy will be aware that I recently informed the Seanad that the legal advice available to me is that the natural parent’s constitutional right to privacy must be reflected in the legislation. I am currently engaging with members of the Oireachtas and with stakeholder groups to reach a consensus on balancing these rights which will allow the legislation to progress.  

Pending the outcome of these engagements, I hope to be in a position to bring the Bill back to Seanad Éireann in the autumn.

Child and Family Agency Data

Questions (93)

Seán Sherlock

Question:

93. Deputy Sean Sherlock asked the Minister for Children and Youth Affairs the number of staff employed under an initiative (details supplied) by county; and the grades of staff employed. [29936/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Children)

I wish to inform the Deputy that as the data requested is not readily available my officials have requested that Tusla respond to you directly on this matter. 

Youth Services Funding

Questions (94)

John Curran

Question:

94. Deputy John Curran asked the Minister for Children and Youth Affairs if a progress report will be provided on the development of a single targeted youth funding programme; her views on whether funding is targeted at the most disadvantaged areas; and if she will make a statement on the matter. [29747/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Children)

Implementation of the Value for Money and Policy Review of Youth Funding Programmes been a priority for my Department for some time and represents a significant multistrand change management programme.

Replacement of the existing four targeted schemes with a fit for purpose single targeted scheme is one of the key recommendations of the review. In July 2018 I brought the high-level scheme outline to Government for Information; this outline was arrived at following detailed consultation with the sector and young people, relevant evidence review and a sampling process. The outline stated that young people aged 10 to 24 years of age who are described in the National Youth Strategy (NYS) as marginalised, disadvantaged or vulnerable will be the primary target group for services available through the TYFS.

This outline has since provided the basis for further development of the scheme, the final drafting process of which is currently underway. In addition to development of the new scheme, significant other changes have been introduced including; in January of this year, four funding streams were successfully collapsed in to one scheme in advance of the introduction of the new scheme in 2020. In April 2019, a Service Level Agreement (SLA) was signed between my Department and each of the 16 Education and Training Boards (ETBs) and the process of transferring funds to their functional ETB area began on a phased basis.

Throughout this reform my Department has been engaging proactively with the stakeholders and sample services in relation to various component of the new scheme. In 2018, 6 ETBs participated in a trial and co-design of the Area Profile, Needs Assessment and Service Requirement Tool (APNARS). The tool is designed to enable Education and Training Boards (ETB), who have a mid-level governance role in the new youth funding scheme, to gather and use available demographic data and local knowledge to produce an area profile of their ETB functional area to enable better targeting of services for young people. Based on the information gathered, the ETB analyse the needs of young people in the area and consider the extent to which these needs are being met within existing youth service provision. Completing the tool provides ETBs with a systematic and evidence-informed assessment of needs to inform judgements about priorities for service provision. It also ensures that youth services/projects funded under the new scheme are focused on working to meet the identified needs and key issues in the area in line with the stated objectives of the new scheme. The tool also provides a standardised national template for producing an area profile, needs assessment and Service Requirement document across all ETBs. The tool is a critical component in an evidence-informed approach to providing well targeted services to young people. Service Requirement documents will issue from ETBs to services/projects who are applying for funding through the grant application process on the targeted groups and key issues that are priority.

Unemployment Data

Questions (95)

Willie O'Dea

Question:

95. Deputy Willie O'Dea asked the Taoiseach the number of jobless households by county in tabular form. [30415/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Taoiseach)

The Labour Force Survey (LFS) is a household survey which provides quarterly statistics on employment and unemployment and is the official source of labour market estimates in the State.

The quarterly LFS labour market estimates are produced by NUTS-3 Regions (NUTS-3 is a geocode standard referencing the eight subdivisions of Ireland for statistical purposes). Due to the methodology and sample size of the survey it is not possible to produce reliable county estimates from the LFS. The most recent figures available from the LFS are for the first quarter (Q1) of 2019.

The quarterly LFS results include the following jobless household indicators. The indicator "Proportion of persons aged 18 - 59 years living in jobless households" is calculated as the share of persons aged 18 - 59 who are living in households where no one is in employment. Students aged 18-24 years who live in households composed solely of students (persons who have indicated that their Principal Economic Status is Student) of the same age class are not included. The indicator "Proportion of persons aged 0-17 years living in jobless households" is calculated as the share of persons aged 0 - 17 who are living in households where no one is in employment. The table below shows the LFS jobless household indicators classified by sex, age group and NUTS-3 region in Q1 2019.

LFS jobless household indicators classified by sex, age group and NUTS-3 region, Q1 2019

%

NUTS-3 Regions

Q1 2019

Border

Proportion of persons aged 0-17 living in jobless household (%)

5.7

Proportion of male persons aged 18-59 living in jobless household (%)

8.0

Proportion of female persons aged 18-59 living in jobless household (%)

8.0

Proportion of persons aged 18-59 living in jobless households (%)

8.0

Proportion of all persons aged 0-59 living in jobless households (%)

7.2

West

Proportion of persons aged 0-17 living in jobless household (%)

14.5

Proportion of male persons aged 18-59 living in jobless household (%)

11.4

Proportion of female persons aged 18-59 living in jobless household (%)

11.1

Proportion of persons aged 18-59 living in jobless households (%)

11.2

Proportion of all persons aged 0-59 living in jobless households (%)

12.3

Mid-West

Proportion of persons aged 0-17 living in jobless household (%)

11.3

Proportion of male persons aged 18-59 living in jobless household (%)

8.7

Proportion of female persons aged 18-59 living in jobless household (%)

11.9

Proportion of persons aged 18-59 living in jobless households (%)

10.3

Proportion of all persons aged 0-59 living in jobless households (%)

10.6

South-East

Proportion of persons aged 0-17 living in jobless household (%)

14.1

Proportion of male persons aged 18-59 living in jobless household (%)

10.4

Proportion of female persons aged 18-59 living in jobless household (%)

13.3

Proportion of persons aged 18-59 living in jobless households (%)

11.9

Proportion of all persons aged 0-59 living in jobless households (%)

12.6

South-West

Proportion of persons aged 0-17 living in jobless household (%)

9.9

Proportion of male persons aged 18-59 living in jobless household (%)

9.2

Proportion of female persons aged 18-59 living in jobless household (%)

8.3

Proportion of persons aged 18-59 living in jobless households (%)

8.7

Proportion of all persons aged 0-59 living in jobless households (%)

9.1

Dublin

Proportion of persons aged 0-17 living in jobless household (%)

10.4

Proportion of male persons aged 18-59 living in jobless household (%)

6.3

Proportion of female persons aged 18-59 living in jobless household (%)

7.3

Proportion of persons aged 18-59 living in jobless households (%)

6.8

Proportion of all persons aged 0-59 living in jobless households (%)

7.8

Mid-East

Proportion of persons aged 0-17 living in jobless household (%)

6.7

Proportion of male persons aged 18-59 living in jobless household (%)

5.0

Proportion of female persons aged 18-59 living in jobless household (%)

5.9

Proportion of persons aged 18-59 living in jobless households (%)

5.5

Proportion of all persons aged 0-59 living in jobless households (%)

5.9

Midland

Proportion of persons aged 0-17 living in jobless household (%)

13.5

Proportion of male persons aged 18-59 living in jobless household (%)

12.0

Proportion of female persons aged 18-59 living in jobless household (%)

13.8

Proportion of persons aged 18-59 living in jobless households (%)

12.9

Proportion of all persons aged 0-59 living in jobless households (%)

13.1

State

Proportion of persons aged 0-17 living in jobless household (%)

10.4

Proportion of male persons aged 18-59 living in jobless household (%)

8.0

Proportion of female persons aged 18-59 living in jobless household (%)

9.0

Proportion of persons aged 18-59 living in jobless households (%)

8.5

Proportion of all persons aged 0-59 living in jobless households (%)

9.1

Source: Labour Force Survey, Central Statistics Office.

Data may be subject to sampling or other survey errors, which are greater in respect of smaller values or estimates of change.

Data may be subject to future revision.

Reference period: Q1=Jan- Mar.

Employment Data

Questions (96)

Willie O'Dea

Question:

96. Deputy Willie O'Dea asked the Taoiseach the number of persons that are considered underemployed by county in tabular form. [30416/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Taoiseach)

The Labour Force Survey (LFS) is a household survey which provides quarterly statistics on employment and unemployment and is the official source of labour market estimates in the State.

The quarterly LFS estimates of employment are produced by NUTS-3 Regions (NUTS-3 is a geocode standard referencing the eight subdivisions of Ireland for statistical purposes ); due to the methodology and sample size of the survey it is not possible to produce reliable county estimates from the LFS. The most recent figures available from the LFS are for the first quarter (Q1) of 2019.

The concept of underemployment used by the Central Statistics Office occurs when a person in employment is willing and able to work more hours than they currently do. Thus, a person is underemployed if they are in employment and if they both want to work more hours than they currently do and are available to work more hours than they currently do.

Table 1 below provides a breakdown of the detailed International Labour Organisation (ILO) status (full-time/part-time status and underemployment status) of the number of persons in employment by NUTS-3 Region.

In Q1 2019 there were 2,301,900 persons in employment in the State and of those 172,300 were full-time underemployed and 106,900 were part-time underemployed giving a total of 279,100 persons who were underemployed in the State.

Table 1: Detailed ILO status for persons in employment (Full-time/Part-time, Underemployed) classified by NUTS-3 Region, Q1 2019

'000

NUTS-3 Region:

Region of

residence

Detailed ILO status

Q1 2019

Border

Full-time - does not wish to work more hours

132.9

Full-time - wishes to work more hours and is not available (Not underemployed)

*

Full-time - wishes to work more hours and is available (Full-time Underemployed)

7.9

Total Full-time employed

141.8

Part-time - does not wish to work more hours

30.8

Part-time - wishes to work more hours and is not available (Not underemployed)

*

Part-time - wishes to work more hours and is available (Part-time Underemployed)

8.8

Total Part-time employed

41.1

Total Underemployed (Part-time and Full-time)

16.7

Total Employed

182.9

West

Full-time - does not wish to work more hours

149.9

Full-time - wishes to work more hours and is not available (Not underemployed)

*

Full-time - wishes to work more hours and is available (Full-time Underemployed)

15.5

Total Full-time employed

167.3

Part-time - does not wish to work more hours

33.2

Part-time - wishes to work more hours and is not available (Not underemployed)

*

Part-time - wishes to work more hours and is available (Part-time Underemployed)

10.7

Total Part-time employed

46.3

Total Underemployed (Part-time and Full-time)

26.2

Total Employed

213.6

Mid-West

Full-time - does not wish to work more hours

154.5

Full-time - wishes to work more hours and is not available (Not underemployed)

*

Full-time - wishes to work more hours and is available (Full-time Underemployed)

14.2

Total Full-time employed

171.0

Part-time - does not wish to work more hours

32.1

Part-time - wishes to work more hours and is not available (Not underemployed)

*

Part-time - wishes to work more hours and is available (Part-time Underemployed)

9.3

Total Part-time employed

44.8

Total Underemployed (Part-time and Full-time)

23.5

Total Employed

215.8

South-East

Full-time - does not wish to work more hours

126.4

Full-time - wishes to work more hours and is not available (Not underemployed)

*

Full-time - wishes to work more hours and is available (Full-time Underemployed)

19.1

Total Full-time employed

146.7

Part-time - does not wish to work more hours

26.5

Part-time - wishes to work more hours and is not available (Not underemployed)

*

Part-time - wishes to work more hours and is available (Part-time Underemployed)

12.5

Total Part-time employed

40.8

Total Underemployed (Part-time and Full-time)

31.6

Total Employed

187.5

South-West

Full-time - does not wish to work more hours

233.2

Full-time - wishes to work more hours and is not available (Not underemployed)

*

Full-time - wishes to work more hours and is available (Full-time Underemployed)

23.3

Total Full-time employed

258.1

Part-time - does not wish to work more hours

52.8

Part-time - wishes to work more hours and is not available (Not underemployed)

*

Part-time - wishes to work more hours and is available (Part-time Underemployed)

14.1

Total Part-time employed

71.1

Total Underemployed (Part-time and Full-time)

37.4

Total Employed

329.2

Dublin

Full-time - does not wish to work more hours

506.2

Full-time - wishes to work more hours and is not available (Not underemployed)

[6.6]

Full-time - wishes to work more hours and is available (Full-time Underemployed)

56.2

Total Full-time employed

569.0

Part-time - does not wish to work more hours

100.4

Part-time - wishes to work more hours and is not available (Not underemployed)

9.0

Part-time - wishes to work more hours and is available (Part-time Underemployed)

26.5

Total Part-time employed

135.9

Total Underemployed (Part-time and Full-time)

82.6

Total Employed

704.9

Mid-East

Full-time - does not wish to work more hours

242.3

Full-time - wishes to work more hours and is not available (Not underemployed)

*

Full-time - wishes to work more hours and is available (Full-time Underemployed)

27.1

Total Full-time employed

272.5

Part-time - does not wish to work more hours

48.0

Part-time - wishes to work more hours and is not available (Not underemployed)

[4.4]

Part-time - wishes to work more hours and is available (Part-time Underemployed)

16.4

Total Part-time employed

68.8

Total Underemployed (Part-time and Full-time)

43.5

Total Employed

341.3

Midland

Full-time - does not wish to work more hours

92.1

Full-time - wishes to work more hours and is not available (Not underemployed)

*

Full-time - wishes to work more hours and is available (Full-time Underemployed)

9.0

Total Full-time employed

102.5

Part-time - does not wish to work more hours

14.3

Part-time - wishes to work more hours and is not available (Not underemployed)

*

Part-time - wishes to work more hours and is available (Part-time Underemployed)

8.5

Total Part-time employed

24.2

Total Underemployed (Part-time and Full-time)

17.5

Total Employed

126.7

State

Full-time - does not wish to work more hours

1637.6

Full-time - wishes to work more hours and is not available (Not underemployed)

19.1

Full-time - wishes to work more hours and is available (Full-time Underemployed)

172.3

Total Full-time employed

1828.9

Part-time - does not wish to work more hours

338.1

Part-time - wishes to work more hours and is not available (Not underemployed)

28.0

Part-time - wishes to work more hours and is available (Part-time Underemployed)

106.9

Total Part-time employed

473.0

Total Underemployed (Part-time and Full-time)

279.1

Total Employed

2301.9

Source: Labour Force Survey (LFS), Central Statistics Office, Ireland.

*Estimates for numbers of persons or averages where there are less than 30 persons in a cell are not produced as estimates are too small to be considered reliable.

Parentheses [ ] indicate where there are 30-49 persons in a cell, estimates are considered to have a wider margin of error and should be treated with caution.

Data may be subject to future revision.

Data may be subject to sampling or other survey errors, which are greater in respect of smaller values or estimates of change.

Reference period: Q1 January -March.

Departmental Shareholdings

Questions (97)

Catherine Connolly

Question:

97. Deputy Catherine Connolly asked the Taoiseach if he will provide details of all entities in which he or his Department hold shares. [30191/19]

View answer

Written answers (Question to Taoiseach)

Neither the Department of the Taoiseach nor the Taoiseach on behalf of the Department hold shares in any entity.