Citizenship Applications

Ceisteanna (126)

Thomas Pringle

Ceist:

126. Deputy Thomas Pringle asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the status of the case of a person (details supplied) who has applied for citizenship; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [4509/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Justice)

I am advised by the Irish Naturalisation and Immigration Service (INIS) of my Department that the processing of the application for a certificate of naturalisation from the person referred to by the Deputy is ongoing. On completion of the necessary processing the application will be submitted to me for decision as expeditiously as possible. Should further documentation be required it will be requested from the applicant in due course.

As the Deputy will appreciate, the granting of Irish citizenship through naturalisation is a privilege and an honour which confers certain rights and entitlements, not only within the State but also at European Union level, and it is important that appropriate procedures are in place to preserve the integrity of the process.

It is recognised that all applicants for citizenship would wish to have a decision on their application without delay. The nature of the naturalisation process is such that, for a broad range of reasons, some cases will take longer than others to process. In some instances, completing the necessary checks can take a considerable period of time.

Queries in relation to the status of individual immigration cases may be made directly to the INIS of my Department by e-mail using the Oireachtas Mail facility which has been specifically established for this purpose. This service enables up to date information on such cases to be obtained without the need to seek information by way of the Parliamentary Questions process. The Deputy may consider using the e-mail service except in cases where the response from the INIS is, in the Deputy’s view, inadequate or too long awaited.

Refugee Resettlement Programme

Ceisteanna (127)

Bernard Durkan

Ceist:

127. Deputy Bernard J. Durkan asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the progress to date in respect of an application to the Irish refugee protection programme humanitarian admissions programme in the case of a person (details supplied); the correct procedure to be followed at this stage; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [4520/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Justice)

I am informed by the Irish Naturalisation and Immigration Service (INIS) of my Department that the person in question was informed of the outcome of their initial application by letter dated 18 December 2018. I understand that the letter set out in detail the reasons for the outcome. The Deputy may wish to note that a second window for applications under the Irish Refugee Protection Programme Humanitarian Admissions Programme (IHAP) is currently open until 8 February 2019. It is open to the person in question to submit fresh application under the IHAP if they so wish. Any new application submitted should give full regard to the reasons given for the refusal of the previous application.

Queries in relation to the status of individual immigration cases may be made directly to the INIS of my Department by e-mail using the Oireachtas Mail facility which has been specifically established for this purpose. This service enables up to date information on such cases to be obtained without the need to seek information by way of the Parliamentary Questions process. The Deputy may consider using the e-mail service except in cases where the response from the INIS is, in the Deputy’s view, inadequate or too long awaited.

Direct Provision Data

Ceisteanna (128)

Michael McGrath

Ceist:

128. Deputy Michael McGrath asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the number of persons in direct provision; the number who have been able to open bank accounts to receive direct provision; the way in which a person receives direct provision if the person is prevented from opening a bank account; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [4544/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Justice)

Individuals who seek to make an application for International Protection within the State are provided with accommodation by the Reception and Integration Agency (RIA) of the Department of Justice and Equality. As of 20th January 2019, there were 6,227 persons living in accommodation provided by the RIA. This figure includes 337 persons residing in emergency accommodation.

International Protection applicants who reside in this accommodation are provided with full board, accommodation and other services as well as a daily expenses allowance. I’m advised by the Department of Employment Affairs and Social Protection, which administers the allowance, that payments are generally made through the post office network. The customer attends the post office to collect the payment personally. The opening of a bank account for these purposes therefore is not necessary.

Under the European Union (Payment Accounts) Regulations 2016, any consumer who is legally resident in the EU, including an asylum seeker, who does not already have a payment account with a credit institution in the State has the right to open and use a payment account with basic features. Such institutions should be aware of their obligations under national and EU law in this regard. This information was also transmitted throughout the Centres to applicants during the presentations made and the booklets produced for the information campaign surrounding access to the labour market last June. My Department does not enquire into the personal management of finances by applicants.

Departmental Staff Data

Ceisteanna (129)

Micheál Martin

Ceist:

129. Deputy Micheál Martin asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the number of staff working in the procurement area for major State infrastructure projects in his Department; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [4582/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Justice)

Significant building projects arise in the main within agencies in the Justice and Equality sector rather than the Department itself, or are managed by the Office of Public Works on behalf of the Department and its agencies. I have requested the agencies under the remit of my Department to respond directly to the Deputy.

Commencement of Legislation

Ceisteanna (130)

Brendan Howlin

Ceist:

130. Deputy Brendan Howlin asked the Minister for Justice and Equality when the sections of the Assisted Decision-Making (Capacity) Act 2015 not yet commenced will be commenced; if the decision support service is now in operation; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [4631/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Justice)

The Assisted Decision-Making (Capacity) Act 2015 provides a modern statutory framework to support decision-making by adults with capacity difficulties. The Act was signed into law on 30 December 2015 but has not yet been fully commenced. New administrative processes and support measures, including the setting up of the Decision Support Service within the Mental Health Commission (a body under the Department of Health), must be put in place before the substantive provisions of the Act can be commenced.

A number of provisions of the 2015 Act were commenced in October 2016 in order to progress the setting up of the Decision Support Service. The Assisted Decision-Making (Capacity) Act 2015 (Commencement of Certain Provisions) Order 2016 (S.I. No. 515 of 2016), brought Part 1 (Preliminary and General) and Part 9 (Director of the Decision Support Service) of the Act, other than sections 3, 4 and 7 in Part 1 and sections 96 and 102 and Chapter 3 in Part 9, into operation on 17 October 2016. These provisions were brought into operation in order to enable the recruitment of the Director of the Decision Support Service.

The commencement of Part 8 of the Act, which provides a legislative framework for advance healthcare directives, is a matter for the Minister for Health. The Minister for Health, under the Assisted Decision-Making (Capacity) Act 2015 (Commencement of Certain Provisions) (No. 2) Order 2016 (S.I. No. 517 of 2016), brought some provisions of Part 8 of the Act into operation on 17 October 2016. The provisions commenced in Part 8 were the definition of “Minister” in section 82; the definitions of “code of practice” and “working group” in section 91(1); and section 91(2). The commenced provisions provide for the establishment by the Minister for Health of a multi-disciplinary group to make recommendations to the Director of the Decision Support Service in relation to codes of practice on advance healthcare directives.

The Minister for Health commenced the remainder of section 91 on 17 December 2018 (S.I. No. 527 of 2018) to enable the Director of the Decision Support Service to progress the preparation of the codes of practice as soon as the multi-disciplinary group submits its recommendations to the Director.

A high-level Steering Group comprised of senior officials from the Department of Justice and Equality, the Department of Health, the Mental Health Commission and the Courts Service, together with the Director of the Decision Support Service, is overseeing the establishment and commissioning of the Decision Support Service and this work is ongoing. The key preparations are being put in place under the oversight of the Steering Group to allow for further commencement orders for the provisions of the 2015 Act to be made when the Decision Support Service is ready to roll out the new decision-making support options.

The Decision Support Service is not yet operational but every effort is underway to ensure that the Decision Support Service has all necessary capacity to open for business as soon as possible. While the Decision Support Service has been working towards being operational and ready for the commencement of the main provisions of the Act in 2020, the situation is being kept under review as the preparatory work on implementation moves forward.

The 2019 Revised Estimates Volume provides for an allocation of €3.5 million in the Justice and Equality Vote for the establishment of the Decision Support Service.

Departmental Contracts Data

The following deferred reply was received under Standing Order 42A

Ceisteanna (131)

Michael McGrath

Ceist:

131. Deputy Michael McGrath asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the final agreed tender price and the date of the tender for the contract in respect of each capital expenditure project which cost €10 million or more since 2010, in tabular form; the final overall amount paid; the date of the final payment in respect of the completion of the project; the reason the final amount paid exceeded the final tender price; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [4645/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Justice)

I wish to inform the Deputy that in the time available it has not been possible to gather all of the necessary data to respond in full on this matter. My Department has contacted the relevant Justice sector agencies to collate the necesssary information and I will forward this as soon as it is available.

The following deferred reply was received under Standing Order 42A
I refer to parliamentary question No. 131 for answer on 30 January 2019. As the Deputy will recall, the information you requested could not be obtained in the time available and I undertook to contact him again.
Having contacted the relevant Justice sector Agencies to collate the necessary information, please find below the requested information in tabular form.

Capital Project

Final Agreed Tender Price

Date of Tender for Contract

Final Overall Amount Paid

Date of Final Payment

Reason, where applicable, Final Amount Exceeded Tender

Midlands Prison Extension

€23,680,865 excl. VAT

Sep-10

€24,767,868 excl. VAT

16/10/2014 (retention)

The difference of €1,087,003 relates to works carried out including additional kitchen and visiting facilities.

Cork Prison New Development

€33,706,391 excl. VAT

Dec-13

€38,116,073 excl. VAT

20/12/2016 (retention)

The difference of €4,409,682 between the contracted sum and the total paid to contractor is accounted for by the following:

Addition of three storey recreation block

Difficult ground conditions required additional substructure works

Gate building layout changes

Segregation yard remodel

Additional structure for kitchen area

Kevin St Garda Station *

€27,480,605# incl. VAT

Jan-15

Still being negotiated with contractor.

N/A

N/A

Wexford Garda Station *

€22,300,000# incl. VAT

Jul-15

€22,165,000 incl. VAT Final account now agreed.

The release of the final payment to the contractor is expected to issue shortly following the completion of a site inspection by the project architect.

N/A

Galway Garda Station *

€24,974,632# incl. VAT

Oct-15

Still being negotiated with contractor.

N/A

N/A

Schengen Information System

€21,758,068 incl. VAT

Dec-16

N/A Contract running until 2021

N/A Payments continuing

N/A

Courts PPP Bundle **

€150m excl. VAT

Mar-15

Unitary Charge

2042

n/a

* Contracts in relation to new Garda Stations at Kevin Street, Galway and Wexford are managed by the Office of Public Works on behalf of An Garda Síochána and have not been finalised.
** The figure quoted for the Courts PPP Bundle is a notional figure, as PPP projects are paid for by means of a Unitary Charge over a 25 year period post construction.
# Price when tenders were received

Crime Data

Ceisteanna (132, 134)

Bernard Durkan

Ceist:

132. Deputy Bernard J. Durkan asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the number of offences committed by perpetrators of all ages while on bail in each of the past five years to date; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [4651/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Bernard Durkan

Ceist:

134. Deputy Bernard J. Durkan asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the number of crimes committed and reported in each of the past five years to date with reference to both urban and rural areas; the degree to which the perpetrators were on bail at the time of the alleged offences; the extent to which convictions followed by county in tabular form; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [4653/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Justice)

I propose to take Questions Nos. 132 and 134 together.

As the Deputy will be aware, the Central Statistics Office (CSO), as the national statistical agency, is responsible for the compilation and publication of all crime statistics. The table shows the number of crime incidents which are recorded as having at least one offender on bail for the years 2013-2017. The Deputy will have received this information as part of the response to Parliamentary Question No. 68 for answer today.

I have asked officials in my Department to engage with the CSO in relation to the additional information sought by the Deputy and I will contact him directly when the information is to hand.

No. of Crime Incidents which are Recorded as having at least one Offender on Bail for the years 2013 - 2017

Incident Type

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

01 Homicide Offences

7

10

8

4

5

02 Sexual Offences

20

26

28

24

30

03 Attempts/Threats to Murder, assaults, harassments and related offences

504

669

745

746

912

04 Dangerous or Negligent Acts

216

300

326

431

502

05 Kidnapping and Related Offences

7

6

16

8

13

06 Robbery, Extortion and Hijacking Offences

285

399

371

322

351

07 Burglary and Related Offences

1241

1674

1532

1331

1342

08 Theft and Related Offences

4116

5136

5636

6007

6907

09 Fraud, Deception and Related Offences

168

224

281

243

248

10 Controlled Drug Offences

1163

1822

1883

1987

2035

11 Weapons and Explosives Offences

337

438

463

436

463

12 Damage to Property and to the Environment

641

878

901

866

841

13 Public Order and other Social Code Offences

2841

3713

4558

4258

5180

15 Offences against Government, Justice Procedures and Organisation of Crime

4777

6629

8073

8823

9519

Bail Law

Question No. 134 answered with Question No. 132.

Ceisteanna (133)

Bernard Durkan

Ceist:

133. Deputy Bernard J. Durkan asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the degree to which further restrictions on bail need to be considered in view of statistics available to him; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [4652/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Justice)

As the Deputy will be aware, recent changes to the bail laws were introduced in the Criminal Justice Act 2017, with the aim of strengthening the bail system and making the law as effective as possible in protecting the public against crimes committed by persons on bail. The court has the power to refuse bail where there are reasonable grounds to believe the person is likely to commit a serious offence. In assessing this likelihood, the court must take into account the nature and seriousness of the offence, the accused person’s previous offending and may also take into account the danger he or she poses to the public if bail is granted. The Criminal Justice Act 2017 also strengthened Garda powers to deal with breaches of bail providing a power of arrest without warrant in certain circumstances, and made provisions to increase the use of curfews and to facilitate the introduction of electronic tagging for those on bail in certain circumstances.

In terms of available statistics, the Deputy will appreciate that given the new bail laws were only introduced in 2017, the full impact of these provisions will not yet be reflected in the official recorded crime statistics. It is too early to assess whether or not these changes are having the desired effect. It is important to await the evidence of the impact of this new legislation and take the time to evaluate the effect that this Act is having before we explore further changes to the law.

Question No. 134 answered with Question No. 132.

Crime Data

Ceisteanna (135)

Bernard Durkan

Ceist:

135. Deputy Bernard J. Durkan asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the number of reported attacks on women in each of the past five years to date; the degree to which the perpetrator was known to the victim by county in tabular form; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [4654/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Justice)

As the Deputy will be aware, the Central Statistics Office (CSO), as the national statistical agency, is responsible for the compilation and publication of all crime statistics.

The table provides a breakdown of relevant offences by victim gender and Garda Region. However, the CSO has advised that it is not in a position to provide the breakdown at county level.

I am further advised that is not possible to provide information on the degree to which the perpetrator was known to the victim. However, the CSO Review of the Quality of Recorded Crime Statistics which was published in December 2018, found that more comprehensive recording of data on the relationship between victim and offender will be necessary in order to ensure that statistics generated using PULSE data will meet the needs of data users.

It is worth noting that all statistics on recorded crimes are currently categorised as "Under Reservation". An Garda Síochána, with assistance from the CSO, continue to make good progress on returning the crime figures to the higher standard expected of our national crime statistics. I am determined that this body of work be completed as soon as possible and I welcome the continued diligence of the Policing Authority in monitoring this matter.

Recorded Crime Offences for selected incident types by gender and Garda Region for the period 2014 - 2018

Region 

Offence Type

Period

female

male

All

1 Northern Region

Homicide Offences note 2

2014 - 2018 note 1

8

18

26

2014

156

38

194

2015

181

53

234

2016

195

57

252

2017

219

52

271

2018 note 1

211

56

267

Sexual Offences note 3

Total

962

256

1218

2014

662

1130

1792

2015

683

1171

1854

2016

772

1190

1962

2017

944

1318

2262

2018 note 1

672

983

1655

Assaults, harassments and related offences note 4

Total

3733

5792

9525

2 Western Region

Homicide Offences note 2

2014 - 2018 note 1

4

9

13

2014

159

34

193

2015

207

34

241

2016

187

58

245

2017

211

39

250

2018 note 1

173

29

202

Sexual Offences note 3

Total

937

194

1131

2014 - 2018 note 1

540

1036

1576

2015

584

1134

1718

2016

586

932

1518

2017

633

1123

1756

2018 note 1

556

850

1406

Assaults, harassments and related offences note 4

Total

2899

5075

7974

3 Southern Region

Homicide Offences note 2

2014 - 2018 note 1

6

30

36

2014

254

66

320

2015

304

80

384

2016

293

66

359

2017

425

102

527

2018

333

43

376

Sexual Offences note 3

Total

1609

357

1966

2014

982

1599

2581

2015

1037

1778

2815

2016

1089

1654

2743

2017

1268

2051

3319

2018 note 1

943

1427

2370

Assaults, harassments and related offences note 4

Total

5319

8509

13828

4 Eastern Region

Homicide Offences note 2

2014 - 2018 note 1

8

25

33

2014

247

60

307

2015

235

58

293

2016

309

59

368

2017

318

70

388

2018 note 1

240

58

298

Sexual Offences note 3

Total

1349

305

1654

2014

778

1213

1991

2015

894

1307

2201

2016

880

1276

2156

2017

1024

1488

2512

2018 note 1

862

1222

2084

Assaults, harassments and related offences note 4

Total

4438

6506

10944

5 South Eastern Region

Homicide Offences note 2

2014 - 2018 note 1

5

12

17

2014

212

61

273

2015

194

48

242

2016

210

55

265

2017

269

79

348

2018 note 1

227

57

284

Sexual Offences note 3

Total

1112

300

1412

2014

558

915

1473

2015

736

1020

1756

2016

672

954

1626

2017

795

1080

1875

2018 note 1

643

894

1537

Assaults, harassments and related offences note 4

Total

3404

4863

8267

6 Dublin Region

Homicide Offences note 2

2014 - 2018 note 1

15

78

93

2014

445

131

576

2015

543

130

673

2016

590

146

736

2017

608

141

749

2018 note 1

498

140

638

Sexual Offences note 3

Total

2684

688

3372

2014

1415

2621

4036

2015

1591

3118

4709

2016

1964

2956

4920

2017

2071

3289

5360

2018 note 1

1655

2652

4307

Assaults, harassments and related offences note 4

Total

8696

14636

23332

Note 1: Data for 2018 data is for the 9 month period from 01/01/2018 to 30/09/2018

Note 2: Homicide Offences include all recorded incidents of Murder & Manslaughter

Note 3: Sexual Offences include all recorded incidents of Rape, Sexual Assault, Sexual Offences involving Mentally impaired person or persons under 17

Note 4: Assaults, harassments and related offences contains all recorded incidents of Assault, Coercion, Harassment, Poisoning, Threats to Kill or Cause Serious Harm, Murder Attempt, Female Genital Mutilation.

Organised Crime

Ceisteanna (136)

Bernard Durkan

Ceist:

136. Deputy Bernard J. Durkan asked the Minister for Justice and Equality if consideration has been given to proscribing membership of criminal gangs with a view to curtailing their activity in a resolute manner and making the streets safer; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [4655/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Justice)

I can assure the Deputy that tackling organised crime activity is a key ongoing priority for the Government and An Garda Síochána.

The Government, for its part, is committed to providing An Garda Síochána with the necessary resources to tackle this, and all, forms of criminality in our State.

Given the fluid nature of criminal groupings, it is extremely difficult to quantify the number of criminal gangs operating at any particular time. Splinter groups and new gangs can form overnight. Organised Crime is constantly evolving and new innovations in crime are continuously emerging.

From time to time, the question has arisen of providing for an offence of membership of a criminal gang in a manner similar to the approach taken in the Offences Against the State Acts, with regard to membership of a proscribed organisation.

In this regard, it is important to understand the issues which arise in seeking to simply outlaw membership of a criminal gang in such a manner. Most significant is the fact that a criminal gang is not likely to have a similar permanency of organisation and structure that might pertain to a typical subversive organisation or other more fixed group. Similarly, relationships in criminal gangs tend to be more fluid, with shifting memberships and alliances, and a given individual's affiliation with a criminal network might itself be entirely contingent, contextual and ephemeral.

Part 7 of the Criminal Justice Act 2006 (as amended by the Criminal Justice (Amendment) Act 2009) establishes a number of offences targeting the activities of those involved in organised crime. These offences include participation in a criminal organisation and directing a criminal organisation. The latter offence specifically targets those in criminal organisations who give the orders without requiring their direct participation in the commission of criminal offences. On conviction, this offence carries a penalty of up to life imprisonment.

The Criminal Justice Act 2006 also makes it an offence to conspire with one or more persons to do an act that constitutes a serious offence, irrespective of whether such act actually takes place or not. Evidential provisions as to the existence of a criminal organisation were introduced aiding prosecution for the offences under the Act.

Provision was also introduced so that where a serious offence is committed as part of or in furtherance of a criminal organisation, it shall be treated as an aggravating factor for the purpose of determining sentence.

In recent years a number of other legislative measures have been introduced to tackle gang-related and associated crime. For example, the Proceeds of Crime (Amendment) Act 2016 provides additional powers for Gardaí; in particular, powers to allow for the immediate seizure of assets suspected of being the proceeds of crime to order to prevent them being disposed of, and I am pleased that the provisions of this Act are being used by An Garda Síochána today.

The Deputy will appreciate that a comprehensive body of legislation exists to provide for the prosecution for offences relating to organised crime and targeting the proceeds of crime. I believe that An Garda Síochána, with the support of the significant additional resources provided to it by this Government, will prevail in facing down the threat of gangland violence in our communities. An Garda Síochána have faced down this type of threat in the past and will do so again.

Juvenile Offenders

Ceisteanna (137, 138)

Bernard Durkan

Ceist:

137. Deputy Bernard J. Durkan asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the extent to which juveniles have become involved in or associated with criminal gangs; his plans to address the issue; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [4656/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Bernard Durkan

Ceist:

138. Deputy Bernard J. Durkan asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the extent to which juveniles have become part of the drug distribution network of criminal gangs; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [4657/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Justice)

I propose to take Questions Nos. 137 and 138 together.

I am happy to inform the House that my Department has funded research in the form of The Greentown Report, undertaken by the REPPP Project, (Research Evidence into Policy, Programmes and Practice), at the School of Law in the University of Limerick (UL).

This research identifies crime networks as a separate and plausible risk factor underlying criminal offending by certain children. It outlines how the influence of criminal networks increases the level of offending by a small number of children and entraps them in offending situations, including drug distribution.

The REPPP project team implemented a bespoke design process to produce a model for an Irish evidence-informed intervention programme. This new “Greentown Programme” has been designed with the input of leading international expertise on crime and criminal networks, together with Irish scientific, policy and practice expertise in child protection and welfare, drugs and community development.

I understand that proposals for a Greentown Programme intervention model are expected to be finalised early in 2019. I am also advised that it is intended to commence a trial of the Greentown Programme approach, on a pilot basis, in one locality during 2019.

In addition to this An Garda Síochána continue to confront drug-related crime utilising intelligence-led operations and multi-disciplinary approaches to target organised crime groups and individuals involved in crime.

I can assure the Deputy that tackling organised crime activity and those involved in it is an ongoing priority for the Government and An Garda Síochána and that the necessary resources will continue to be made available to address this issue.

Garda Station Refurbishment

Ceisteanna (139)

Bernard Durkan

Ceist:

139. Deputy Bernard J. Durkan asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the details of the programme for the refurbishment of Garda stations nationally; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [4658/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Justice)

Very significant capital investment is being made in An Garda Síochána, in support of the Government’s commitment to ensure a strong and visible police presence throughout the country, to maintain and strengthen community engagement, provide reassurance to citizens and deter crime.

Investment of €342 million is being made in Garda ICT infrastructure between 2016 and 2021; along with investment of €46 million in the Garda Fleet over the same period.

In relation to the Garda estate, I would first note that the programme of replacement and refurbishment of Garda accommodation is progressed by the Garda authorities working in close cooperation with the Office of Public Works (OPW), which has the responsibility for the provision and maintenance of Garda accommodation. As Minister, I have no direct role in these matters.

As the Deputy will appreciate, the Garda Building and Refurbishment Programme 2016-2021 is based on agreed Garda priorities in relation to their accommodation needs nationwide. It involves over €60 million exchequer funding spread across both the OPW and Garda Votes as well as a major PPP. This investment is intended to address deficiencies in the Garda estate and provide fit-for-purpose facilities for Garda members and staff as well as the public interacting with them.

The programme includes planned works at over 30 locations, including:

- major refurbishment of selected stations and facilities, including facilities for meeting victims of crime;

- essential remedial works to selected existing stations; and

- development of large scale Property and Exhibit Management Stores (PEMS).

The programme also includes a Cell Refurbishment Programme and provision of improved Custody Management Facilities.

Good progress is being made in implementation of the programme.

I am informed by the Garda authorities and the OPW that work has already been completed at 83 stations under the Cell Refurbishment Programme.

I further understand that refurbishments have been completed at locations including Tralee and Mullingar; that remedial works have been completed in a number of locations, including Bailieborough, Henry Street Limerick and the Garda College; and that PEMS stores have been completed in Ennis and Castlebar. I further understand that fire safety works have been completed at a number of locations and that custody facilities have been completed at Henry Street, Limerick.

I am informed that a range of other refurbishments and works included in the programme are progressing. In some cases such as Glanmire, Athlone and Transaer House, Dublin Airport, contractors are on-site; while in other cases works are at various points in the design and procurement phases.

In relation to the Public Private Partnership (PPP) arrangement included in the Building and Refurbishment Programme which will deliver new stations at Clonmel, Macroom and Sligo as well as a new custody suite at Anglesea Street Garda Station, Cork, I can confirm to the Deputy that my Department and An Garda Síochána are engaging actively with the NDFA in relation to progressing the project.

The Deputy will also be aware that in addition to works complete or ongoing under the Building and Refurbishment Programme, three new Regional and Divisional Headquarters have been constructed in Galway, Wexford and Kevin Street, Dublin with the provision of Government funding of over €100 million. Each of these headquarters has been completed and is now operational.

I am informed that other major building projects currently progressing in relation to the Garda estate include the refurbishment of Fitzgibbon Street station, on which enabling works commenced during 2018; the development of a facility at Military Road, Dublin; and the Garda Station Pilot Re-opening Project.

These and other developments are the result of the unprecedented investment currently being made in An Garda Síochána and demonstrate the Government’s commitment to addressing the deficiencies in the Garda estate and the accommodation needs of the organisation in accordance with agreed Garda priorities and in a planned and structured way.

Prisoner Rehabilitation Programmes

Ceisteanna (140)

Bernard Durkan

Ceist:

140. Deputy Bernard J. Durkan asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the degree to which particular attention is paid to ensuring that first time offenders in prison are readily facilitated in terms of education and rehabilitation with a view to preventing them becoming involved in a lifetime of crime; if statistics are available to illustrate the benefits of the programme with particular reference to recidivism; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [4659/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Justice)

I wish to advise the Deputy that the Irish Prison Service provides a wide range of rehabilitative programmes to those in custody including education, vocational training, healthcare, psychiatric, psychological, counselling, welfare and spiritual services. Engagement in such programmes offers purposeful activity to those in custody while serving their sentences and encourages offenders to lead law-abiding lives on release. These programmes are available in all prisons and all prisoners are eligible to use the services, including first-time offenders.

In addition, the Irish Prison Service has contracted the Irish Association for the Social Integration of Offenders (IASIO) to provide two prison-based operational services, the Training & Employment Officer Service and the Resettlement Coordinator Service, both of which are aimed at assisting in reintegration and reducing reoffending.

The Training & Employment Officer and the individual prisoner work together to identify an improved pathway in life, away from a life of offending. This includes working to identify and remove any barriers that stand in the way of positive change, and setting out the necessary steps to achieving a new way of life. In practical terms, this means guiding people into employment or training and educational programmes that help the person realise their ultimate goals. This service is available in the Mountjoy Campus, the West Dublin Campus, Portlaoise, Midlands, Castlerea, and Shelton Abbey Open Centre.

In 2018, the prison-based Training & Employment Officers worked with prisoners and other services to place 114 prisoners in work or work experience, 195 prisoners in training or further education, and completed guidance and group work with another 106 prisoners. In 2018, the Training & Employment Officers engaged with 873 referred prisoners.

In addition the Irish Prison Service has contracted the Irish Association for the Social Integration of Offenders (IASIO) to provide resettlement coordinators in each of our closed prisons to act as a central point of reference for prisoners and external agencies in the process of identifying suitable accommodation options prior to release. An additional post-release coordinator is provided to Cork Prison by the Cork Local Drug and Alcohol Task Force.

Resettlement coordinators take a case-management approach to intervening with a prisoner 9 to 12 months pre-release to commence planning for post-release supports, including amongst other functions, working with the individual in custody to submit housing, welfare and medical card applications well in advance of release.

While specific statistics are not available, evidence shows that addressing such factors as education, employment, housing, drug and alcohol misuse, attitudes and self control, institutionalisation and life skills contributes to reduced reoffending.

The latest data in relation to recidivism rates for offenders who were given a custodial sentence or community sanction is contained in the fourth set of recidivism studies published by the Central Statistics Office in November 2016.

There has been a continued reduction in the recidivism level for the cohort of prisoners released in 2010, these are the latest figures available on the Central Statistics Office website. The Prison Recidivism Studies for 2007, 2008 and 2009 showed a recidivism rate of 55%, 51% and 47.5% respectively. The overall figure for 2010 is 45.1% which represents a reduction of 10% since these studies commenced.

The Central Statistics Office are currently working on the studies for the cohort of people released in 2011 and 2012 and it is anticipated that these reports will be published in the next 6 months.

Drugs Crime

Ceisteanna (141)

Bernard Durkan

Ceist:

141. Deputy Bernard J. Durkan asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the degree to which the most serious and life damaging illegal drugs are becoming available nationally; the extent to which An Garda Síochána remains equipped to combat same; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [4660/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Justice)

The illicit drugs market has evolved in recent years, with pharmaceutical and technological advances contributing to the diversity of substances emerging. Changing patterns in drug use that have become evident include a significant shift in use from cannabis resin to cannabis herb. Other notable trends in drug use are the increasing prevalence of poly drug use, often involving a combination of alcohol, traditionally controlled substances and/or new psychoactive substances, and an increasing illicit use of prescription medicines. Crack Cocaine has been noted as present in the Irish drug market for over a decade. Usually associated with people with problematic heroin use, it is becoming a larger problem in some communities recently.

The expansion of online markets for drugs represents a new and potentially growing challenge, as do changes in synthetic drug and cannabis production. The internet facilitates movement of products, money and information across global borders. Medicines and other substances, including controlled drugs, can be sourced through the darknet and the surface net.

In this regard, the Garda National Drugs and Organised Crime Bureau, in partnership with its European counterparts, monitors the sale of all drugs via the internet to identify emerging trends and patterns. In tackling online trade in drugs, the Garda National Drugs and Organised Crime Bureau maintains a liaison with the Enforcement Section of the Health Products Regulatory Authority and with the Customs authorities.

As the Deputy is aware, the manner in which the resources of An Garda Síochána are deployed is solely a matter for the Garda Commissioner and his management team and I, as Minister, have no direct role in this regard. However, I am informed by the Commissioner that the resources coming on stream since the reopening of the Garda College in September 2014 has enabled him to assign additional resources to the specialist units that come within the ambit of Special Crime Operations, including the Garda National Drugs and Organised Crime Bureau.

I am assured that An Garda Síochána remains resolute in its determination to act against those within society who pose a significant threat to the welfare and well-being of our citizens and the communities they serve. All Gardaí have a responsibility in the prevention and detection of criminal activity, whether it be in the area of drug offence crime or otherwise. A core focus of the work carried out by An Garda Síochána is aimed at tackling drugs and organised crime.

The Government has increased the budget for An Garda Síochána to €1.76 billion for 2019, which includes provision for the recruitment of up to 800 Gardaí this year. The Commissioner has informed me that he intends to recruit a total of 600 trainee Gardaí along with a net 600 Garda Staff (civilian). The recruitment of these additional Garda Staff will allow the Commissioner to redeploy this year a further 500 fully trained Gardaí from administrative duties to the frontline policing duties for which they were trained. The Government fully supports the Commissioner’s management decision which will ensure that increasing numbers of Gardaí are available for frontline duties in the prevention and detection of criminal activity, whether it be in the area of drug offence crime or otherwise, in 2019 and beyond.

Garda Strength

Ceisteanna (142)

Bernard Durkan

Ceist:

142. Deputy Bernard J. Durkan asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the number of members of An Garda Síochána including reserve members available for duty at all times nationally; the extent to which membership of the force continues to be deployed in order to bring the strength of the force up to optimum levels in all areas; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [4661/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Justice)

As the Deputy will appreciate, the Garda Commissioner is responsible for the distribution of personnel and I, as Minister, have no direct role in the matter. Garda management keeps this distribution under review in the context of crime trends and policing priorities to ensure optimum use is made of the resources.

I am informed by the Commissioner that as of the 31 December 2018 the overall strength of An Garda Síochána was 14,032 with 530 Reserves and 2,430 Civilians.

I can assure the Deputy that this Government is committed to ensuring a strong and visible police presence throughout the country in order to maintain and strengthen community engagement, provide reassurance to citizens and to deter crime.

Since the reopening of the Garda College in September 2014, almost 2,400 recruits have attested as members of An Garda Síochána and have been assigned to mainstream duties nationwide. Garda numbers reached the target of 14,000 by the end of 2018 are on track to reach 15,000 by 2021.

The Commissioner has this year been provided with an additional €100 million bringing his budget to almost €1.8 billion which includes provision for the recruitment of up to 800 Gardaí next year.

The Commissioner has informed me that he intends to recruit a total of 600 trainee Gardaí in 2019 while in tandem it is his intention to recruit a net 600 Garda Staff (civilians). This increase of Garda staff will enable the Commissioner to redeploy 500 Gardaí from administrative duties to frontline policing in 2019.

The Commission on the Future of Policing in Ireland, in its report published in September 2018 and which was adopted by the Government in December 2018 recommended that recruitment to the Garda Reserve be paused, pending completion of a strategic review of the Reserve, with a view to ensuring that the best possible use is made of this valuable resource.

It is disappointing that the number of Garda Reserve Members has dropped in recent years. The strength of the Reserve as of 31 December 2018 was 530. However, both the Government and the Garda Commissioner remain committed to increasing the strength of the Garda Reserve and to that end I have been informed by the Commissioner that a training class of approximately 100 Garda Reserves, who successfully applied under previous recruitment drives will commence training in the first quarter of 2019.

For more general information on Garda Facts and Figures please see the following link: http://www.justice.ie/en/JELR/Pages/An_Garda_Siochana_facts_and_figures

Gender Balance

Ceisteanna (143)

Bernard Durkan

Ceist:

143. Deputy Bernard J. Durkan asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the extent of gender balance within An Garda Síochána at all ranks; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [4662/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Justice)

I am informed by the Commissioner that the total number of women in all ranks of An Garda Síochána as of the 31 December 2018, the latest date for which figures are currently available was 3,759 or 27 % of the total strength. This compares favourably with 3,130 or 21.7% of the total strength on 31 December 2008. While this is broadly in line with other police services in England and Wales, there is clearly plenty of scope for improvement.

In the course of its work the Commission on the Future of Policing in Ireland (CoFPI) held semi-structured focus group discussions with female Garda members to explore the experiences of female Garda personnel regarding their careers, training and development and future prospects. Among the recommendations made in the CoFPI report, which the Government adopted in December 2018, is the reform of the current roster and greater flexibility of work practices which would enhance the attractiveness and job satisfaction of a career in An Garda Síochána.

In addition, the report also recommended that An Garda Síochána should reflect the diversity of Irish society, not only in gender and ethnicity, but also in terms of socio-economic, educational and geographical backgrounds and that they would need to develop recruitment strategies which reach a more diverse intake.

An Garda Síochána is developing a Garda Diversity and Inclusion Strategy which is at an advanced stage and recognises the importance of recruiting from a wide cross-section of the population so that the organisation provides a policing service that reflects the growing diversity of Irish society.

A concerted effort is being made to encourage women and minority communities to consider a career in An Garda Síochána so that its membership reflects the community that it serves. Recent recruitment campaigns have made a significant effort through on-line videos and other media to attract candidates from minority communities and diverse social groups. In the most recent recruitment campaign a series of videos and text were produced in multiple languages including English, Irish, French, Spanish, Italian and Arabic. They were published on the Garda Facebook page which has more than 180,000 followers.

For the Deputy's information I have attached in tabular form, as requested, the number of women by rank on the 31 December 2018, the latest date for which figures are currently available, as supplied by the Commissioner.

Rank

Male

Female

Female as % of Total

Commissioner

1

0

0%

Deputy Commissioner

1

0

0%

Assistant Commissioner

9

2

22%

Chief Superintendent

45

7

16%

Superintendent

165

17

10%

Inspector

297

46

15%

Sergeant

1996

402

20%

Garda

11518

3285

29%

Total

14032

3759

27%

Garda Promotions

The following deferred reply was received under Standing Order 42A

Ceisteanna (144)

Bernard Durkan

Ceist:

144. Deputy Bernard J. Durkan asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the number of promotion posts within An Garda Síochána waiting to be filled; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [4663/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Justice)

I have requested the information sought from the Garda Commissioner and I will write to the Deputy on receipt of same.

The following deferred reply was received under Standing Order 42A
I refer to parliamentary question No. 144 for answer on Wednesday, 30 January 2019. At the time I mentioned in my reply that I would request the specific information requested by the Deputy from the Commissioner and I would write to him on receipt of same.
As previously advised it is the Garda Commissioner is responsible for the distribution of resources, including personnel, among the various Garda Divisions and I, as Minister, have no direct role in the matter. Garda management keeps this distribution of resources under continual review in the context of crime trends and policing priorities so as to ensure that the optimum use is made of these resources.
I am advised by the Commissioner that competitions recently concluded for promotion to the rank of sergeant and inspector with the aim of bringing the number in these ranks up to the full strength as agreed under the Employment Control Framework (ECF). The allocation of successful candidates is currently underway, with 300 newly promoted Sergeants and 113 new promoted Inspectors having been appointed to date.
The process of selecting and appointing members to the ranks of assistant commissioner, chief superintendent and superintendent lies with the Policing Authority since 1 January 2017. As Minister, I have no role in the selection and appointment of candidates to these ranks with the exception of members of the Police Service of Northern Ireland (PSNI) whose appointment by the Authority must be approved by the Government. The Authority held competitions for each of these ranks in 2017. A further superintendent competition was completed in July 2018 and a panel of candidates established by the Authority. A competition for the rank of chief superintendent has just been completed. The existence of panels ensures that vacancies arising can be filled without any undue delay.
Appointments to the ranks of Commissioner and Deputy Commissioner are made by Government upon the nomination of the Authority.
Appointments to the ranks of sergeant and inspector are a matter for the Commissioner under section 14 of Garda Síochána Act 2005 .
In common with Government Departments, An Garda Síochána conducts internal promotional competitions as appropriate which affords staff opportunities to progress in their careers within the organisation if they so wish.
All positions at Executive Officer grade and above are potential promotional opportunities for Garda Staff. At this time, An Garda Síochána is recruiting through the Public Appointments Service for posts from Principal Officer level to Clerical Officer level. There is also a live internal Executive Officer competition underway. It is planned to hold further internal competitions at Higher Executive Officer and Assistant Principal Officer level later this year. Panels created as a result of these competitions will be used to fill posts as approved by the Policing Authority and in accordance with centrally agreed sequences.
In addition, Garda Staff in An Garda Síochána are Civil Servants of the State and as such are entitled, if otherwise qualified, to participate in interdepartmental competitions for promotion or open competitions for any post within the Civil Service conducted by the Public Appointments Service.
For the Deputy's information I have set out in the following table the Garda strength of each rank as compared to the ECF as of 1 January 2019, the latest date for which figures are currently available, as supplied by the Garda Commissioner.

-

-

-

Strength of each rank as compared to the ECF as of 1 January 2019

Rank

Strength

ECF

Vacancies

Commissioner

1

1

0

D/Commissioner

1

2

1

A/Commissioner

9

9

0

Chief Superintendent

45

47

2

Superintendent

165

168

3

Inspector

297

381

84

Sergeant

1996

2,110

114

I trust the above is of assistance.

Garda Deployment

Ceisteanna (145)

Bernard Durkan

Ceist:

145. Deputy Bernard J. Durkan asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the extent to which it is expected to increase the strength of An Garda Síochána at all stations throughout north County Kildare; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [4664/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Justice)

As the Deputy is aware, the manner in which the resources of the Garda Síochána are deployed is solely a matter for the Garda Commissioner and his management team and I, as Minister, have no direct role in this regard. I am informed by the Commissioner that Garda management keeps this distribution of resources under continual review in the context of crime trends and policing priorities so as to ensure that the optimum use is made of resources.

Since the reopening of the Garda College in September 2014, just under 2,400 recruits have attested as members and have been assigned to mainstream duties nationwide including 800 trainees who passed out from the college during 2018.

The Government has increased the budget for An Garda Síochána to €1.76 billion for 2019, which includes provision for the recruitment of up to 800 Gardaí this year.

The Commissioner has informed me that he plans to recruit a total of 600 trainee Gardaí in 2019 and, in conjunction, he intends to recruit a net 600 Garda Civilian Staff. This Garda Staff recruitment will allow the Commissioner to redeploy a further 500 fully trained Gardaí from administrative duties to frontline policing in 2019.

The Garda Commissioner has confirmed that the Government’s commitment to increase the overall strength of An Garda Síochána to 15,000 Garda members will be achieved by the target date of 2021.

The Garda strength of the Kildare Division as of 31 December 2018 as provided by the Garda Commissioner is available on my Department’s website through the the following links. http://www.justice.ie/en/JELR/002_Garda_Numbers_by_Division_District_and%20Station_2009_to_30_December_2018.xlsx/Files/002_Garda_Numbers_by_Division_District_and%20Station_2009_to_30_December_2018.xlsx

For more general information on Garda Facts and Figures please see the following link: http://www.justice.ie/en/JELR/Pages/An_Garda_Siochana_facts_and_figures

Garda Station Refurbishment

Ceisteanna (146)

Bernard Durkan

Ceist:

146. Deputy Bernard J. Durkan asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the extent to which refurbishment plans are in hand in respect of existing Garda stations in County Kildare or replacement in lieu thereof; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [4665/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Justice)

As the Deputy will be aware, there has been unprecedented investment in An Garda Síochána in recent years, in support of the Government’s commitment to ensuring a strong and visible police presence throughout the country in order to maintain and strengthen community engagement and provide reassurance to citizens and deter crime.

The resources provided by Government to An Garda Síochána have reached unprecedented levels, with an allocation for 2019 of €1.76 billion. Very significant capital investment is also being made in An Garda Síochána, including investment of €342 million in Garda ICT infrastructure between 2016 and 2021; and investment of €46 million in the Garda Fleet over the same period.

Considerable capital investment is also being made in the Garda estate.

The Deputy will appreciate that the programme of replacement and refurbishment of Garda accommodation is progressed by the Garda authorities working in close cooperation with the Office of Public Works (OPW), which has responsibility for the provision and maintenance of Garda accommodation.

The Garda Building and Refurbishment Programme 2016-2021 is an ambitious 5-year programme based on agreed Garda priorities, which continues to benefit over 30 locations around the country, underpinned by over €60 million Exchequer funding as well as a major Public Private Partnership (PPP). There has been some good progress on the programme in 2018, as well as in other major projects in relation to the Garda estate, including in particular completion and entry into operational use of 3 new Divisional and Regional Headquarters at Wexford, Galway and Kevin Street Dublin, which collectively required funding of over €100 million. The clear goal of this investment is to address deficiencies in the Garda estate and provide fit-for-purpose facilities for Garda members and staff as well as the public interacting with them.

I am informed by the OPW and the Garda authorities that the programme includes the provision of a Divisional Property and Exhibit Management Store (PEMS) at Naas Garda Station. I understand that the designs prepared in that regard by the OPW are currently under consideration by Garda management.

I am further informed that An Garda Síochána is engaging with the OPW in relation to potential upgrade works at a number of Garda stations in the Kildare Division, including Kildare town, Naas, Newbridge and Kilcock. Details of any approved works will be decided by the Garda authorities having regard to the overall accommodation needs of the organisation and the availability of resources.

Prison Service Staff

Ceisteanna (147)

Bernard Durkan

Ceist:

147. Deputy Bernard J. Durkan asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the extent to which promotional prospects remain available to prison staff in all prisons nationally; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [4666/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Justice)

I am informed that the Irish Prison Service administer internal promotional competitions on an ongoing basis to fill vacancies at all levels of the organisation as they arise. In addition to such promotional competitions, the Irish Prison Service also engages in external recruitment, either directly as a recruitment licence holder, or through the Public Appointments Service, for certain posts of a specialised nature.

In respect of internal promotional competitions, such competitions are held as and when vacancies are required to be filled at various grades and any eligible officer may make an application to fill any advertised post. Such competitions are, in the main, open to officers nationally across the Prison Estate.

In 2018, the Irish Prison Service administered eight promotional competitions and I am informed that it is intended to continue to administer promotional competitions throughout 2019 for various grades.

Inspector of Prisons

Ceisteanna (148)

Róisín Shortall

Ceist:

148. Deputy Róisín Shortall asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the steps he has taken to give effect to the decision by his predecessor to combine the role of the Inspector of Prisons with that of the Office of the Ombudsman; and the timescale concerned. [4677/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Justice)

A prisoner complaints system was introduced in November 2012 based on a model recommended by the late Inspector of Prisons, Judge Michael Reilly. The system is categorised according to the nature and seriousness of the complaint and ranges from the most serious 'Category A' complaint through to a 'Category F' complaint.

The late Judge Reilly, who was independent of Government in his post of Inspector, carried out a review of this system in June 2016 and made a number of recommendations. This report entitled “Review, Evaluation and Analysis of the Operation of the present Irish Prison Service Complaints Procedure” is available on my Department's website - www.justice.ie.

Two of the key recommendations in the Inspector's report are that the complaints category system above be simplified and that prisoners’ complaints should be subject to review by the Ombudsman, who would also be able to deal with complaints directly in the case of undue delay. The recommendations in the report were accepted and my officials and officials from the Irish Prison Service have been in advanced discussions with the Ombudsman's office with the aim of establishing an effective complaints system for prisoners.

In these discussions with the Ombudsman, it has been agreed that his engagement with the process will begin after the new complaints procedure has been introduced and bedded down as an internal IPS process in the first instance. This IPS process requires administrative supports such as additional personnel, changes to the Prison Rules, drafting of new policy documents and a new ICT system. Work is well advanced on all of these measures and the IPS expect to introduce the new prisoner complaints system by the third quarter of 2019.

IDA Ireland Data

Ceisteanna (149)

Peadar Tóibín

Ceist:

149. Deputy Peadar Tóibín asked the Minister for Business, Enterprise and Innovation the IDA site visits, investment and jobs created in each of the years 2014 to 2018, by county; and if she will make a statement on the matter. [4529/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Business)

My Department and its agencies are working towards ambitious targets to ensure that employment and investment are distributed as evenly as possible across the country. I am pleased to say that significant progress is being made with 58% of all IDA-supported employment now outside of Dublin. This represents the highest number of people employed by IDA clients outside of the capital in the history of the organisation. The last year has also seen more IDA jobs added in the regions than at any time over the past 17 years. I am determined, together with the IDA, to see this trend continue and we will be doing everything possible in 2019 to encourage more firms to invest further in the regions.

The following tables outline the number of IDA supported jobs by county from 2014 to 2018 and the number of site visits from 2014 until Q3 2018. Information on site visits for the last three months of last year will be available shortly.

Table A: IDA jobs by County 2014-2018

County

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

Cavan

1,136

1,165

1,203

1,155

1,096

Donegal

2,607

2,918

3,039

3,392

3,564

Leitrim

682

745

803

884

909

Louth

3,060

3,245

3,603

3,764

3,903

Monaghan

275

146

137

150

162

Sligo

2,264

2267

2,341

2,238

2,251

Dublin

71,362

76,090

83,381

90,529

96,760

Kildare

9,600

10,123

9,740

8,452

8,838

Meath

1,656

1,658

1,661

1,565

1,632

Wicklow

2,327

2,203

2,234

2,230

2,618

Laois

92

119

131

134

122

Longford

721

774

783

745

900

Offaly

1,059

1,080

1,107

1,167

1,232

Westmeath

2,561

2,689

2,749

2,973

3,466

Clare

6,252

6,373

6,746

7,006

6,948

Limerick

7,930

8,702

9,827

10,607

11,796

Tipperary North Riding

298

318

328

335

204

Carlow

749

768

802

875

1,150

Kilkenny

716

650

762

716

711

Tipperary South Riding

3,246

3,215

3,040

3,330

3,516

Waterford

5,248

5,574

6,253

6,690

7,064

Wexford

2,591

2,583

2,740

2,987

3,139

Cork

28,848

33,049

35,335

36,780

38,867

Kerry

1,895

1,948

2,097

2,187

2,241

Galway

14,746

15,463

17,041

18,503

19,969

Mayo

3,912

4,050

4,214

4,484

4,828

Roscommon

916

994

985

1,139

1,171

Total

176,749

188,909

203.082

215.017

229,057

Table B: IDA site visits by county 2013-Q3 2018

County

2014

2015

2016

2017

Q1 2018

Q2 2018

Q3 2018

Dublin

205

242

284

327

69

72

68

Kildare

1

7

8

10

4

0

1

Meath

2

7

8

3

1

3

1

Wicklow

4

7

5

2

0

1

0

Laois

0

4

6

4

4

2

1

Longford

0

2

6

7

0

0

2

Offaly

1

8

4

5

0

1

3

Westmeath

12

28

36

42

3

9

6

Clare

9

12

18

22

4

3

2

Limerick

22

40

49

42

8

7

10

Tipperary

3

12

8

8

1

1

2

Cavan

1

0

2

2

0

1

0

Louth

10

20

24

22

6

6

3

Monaghan

0

2

2

1

0

1

0

Donegal

6

5

7

2

0

3

3

Leitrim

2

8

8

5

2

3

0

Sligo

7

15

20

18

5

3

4

Carlow

2

1

9

8

1

2

0

Kilkenny

4

10

10

6

0

2

1

Waterford

11

31

17

11

5

9

5

Wexford

1

4

7

3

0

1

2

Cork

30

48

49

51

10

14

21

Kerry

3

6

3

9

0

5

3

Galway

19

41

42

62

10

20

12

Mayo

4

3

5

7

2

2

3

Roscommon

0

2

1

3

0

1

1

Total

359

565

638

682

135

172

154

Enterprise Ireland Data

Ceisteanna (150)

Peadar Tóibín

Ceist:

150. Deputy Peadar Tóibín asked the Minister for Business, Enterprise and Innovation the investment and jobs created by Enterprise Ireland in each of the years 2014 to 2018, by county; and if she will make a statement on the matter. [4530/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Business)

Enterprise Ireland (EI) supports companies in urban and rural areas to start, innovate and remain competitive in international markets, now and into the future. In 2018 EI client companies reported strong employment performance with 215,207 people employed in companies supported by the agency and 18,846 new jobs created. The number of jobs supported by EI and the payments given to EI companies are detailed in the following tables.

Table 1: Total employment in EI supported companies by county 2014 to 2018

County

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

Carlow

2,691

2,852

2,973

3,034

3,221

Cavan

4,663

4,905

5,221

5,451

5,842

Clare

3,271

3,255

3,444

3,709

4,102

Cork

22,609

23,955

24,936

25,975

23,902

Donegal

3,302

3,567

3,581

3,552

3,818

Dublin

61,203

66,866

70,365

72,461

76,815

Galway

6,823

7,278

7,294

8,103

8,091

Kerry

4,314

4,678

4,677

4,866

4,727

Kildare

7,512

8,308

8,632

9,134

8,923

Kilkenny

3,605

3,921

4,167

4,276

4,549

Laois

1,179

1,297

1,385

1,473

1,527

Leitrim

722

820

922

559

607

Limerick

7,013

6,777

7,954

8,269

9,553

Longford

2,360

2,628

2,886

2,970

2,979

Louth

5,434

5,600

5,819

6,121

5,923

Mayo

3,784

3,667

3,856

4,118

4,692

Meath

6,658

6,855

7,007

7,302

7,135

Monaghan

4,539

4,819

5,168

5,366

5,626

Offaly

3,452

3,794

3,941

4,281

4,307

Roscommon

1,560

1,686

1,688

1,776

1,764

Sligo

1,853

1,723

1,546

1,733

1,916

Tipperary

4,917

5,264

5,352

5,907

5,921

Waterford

5,060

5,561

5,721

6,359

6,849

Westmeath

3,436

3,548

3,653

3,741

3,536

Wexford

4,484

4,696

4,816

4,670

4,674

Wicklow

3,628

3,903

4,104

4,132

4,208

Total

180,072

192,223

201,108

209,338

215,207

Source: Corresponding Year's Annual Employment survey results 2014 – 2018

Table 2: EI Payments to Client Companies by County 2014 to 2018

County

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

Carlow

€1,065,648

€1,270,387

€1,789,646

€1,118,817

€856,501

Cavan

€2,159,893

€3,852,200

€5,491,945

€2,509,330

€3,864,594

Clare

€1,629,586

€1,575,122

€1,814,188

€3,490,451

€1,711,261

Cork

€10,358,287

€10,027,253

€12,428,944

€9,630,852

€8,258,735

Donegal

€1,057,850

€2,091,993

€549,804

€1,738,720

€1,306,644

Dublin

€33,795,874

€27,382,088

€35,104,063

€34,113,688

€32,090,000

Galway

€4,264,258

€3,671,039

€4,408,207

€4,678,283

€5,050,853

Kerry

€2,370,472

€2,426,203

€3,179,274

€2,683,363

€2,471,050

Kildare

€2,678,039

€2,819,471

€5,554,222

€3,567,276

€4,131,644

Kilkenny

€6,210,766

€5,907,993

€1,954,707

€2,943,649

€2,593,097

Laois

€446,685

€763,516

€892,958

€345,759

€561,312

Leitrim

€651,679

€644,222

€275,037

€142,319

€350,560

Limerick

€3,108,803

€2,409,749

€3,298,041

€3,475,348

€4,297,737

Longford

€717,967

€2,751,123

€1,004,560

€1,076,148

€4,000,876

Louth

€1,603,265

€4,396,281

€5,569,603

€4,063,517

€3,079,928

Mayo

€1,803,125

€1,210,388

€1,763,754

€5,021,555

€1,034,750

Meath

€2,679,331

€2,205,442

€1,971,375

€1,177,941

€996,976

Monaghan

€2,409,719

€2,476,380

€2,714,246

€7,191,630

€2,088,998

Offaly

€543,232

€564,153

€920,548

€1,408,973

€1,031,220

Roscommon

€408,337

€366,826

€844,931

€1,524,042

€121,099

Sligo

€619,865

€468,224

€1,041,235

€981,489

€758,406

Tipperary

€4,064,697

€5,447,999

€1,728,842

€2,507,610

€2,243,651

Waterford

€2,944,665

€3,928,310

€866,677

€1,269,362

€1,732,163

Westmeath

€1,082,298

€1,424,046

€1,537,281

€1,162,769

€1,226,009

Wexford

€1,085,693

€2,204,820

€936,154

€2,136,312

€4,716,005

Wicklow

€1,299,971

€1,899,864

€1,970,730

€1,740,122

€3,944,132

Grand Total

€91,060,005

€94,185,093

€99,610,972

€101,699,324

€94,518,201

Note: (Payments Report excludes infrastructural clients, recipients of Employment Subsidy Schemes I and II, Community Enterprise Centres and Shannon Free Zone transfer companies, Innovation Partnerships & Innovation Vouchers).