Departmental Budgets

Question No. 67 answered with Question No. 59.

Ceisteanna (66)

Barry Cowen

Ceist:

66. Deputy Barry Cowen asked the Minister for Finance the breakdown of the €24 million capital allocation to the Revenue Commissioners, that is, Vote 9 of the budget 2019 expenditure report for 2019 by specific project; the projects that will be commenced in 2019; the projects that will be completed in 2019, in tabular form; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [5999/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Finance)

I am advised by Revenue that their capital expenditure largely relates to Information and Communications Technology (ICT). Continued investment in ICT has been and will continue to be a major driver of and underpinning for significant productivity growth in Revenue, for the provision of optimal service challenges and service for businesses and individual taxpayers and for enhanced governance and risk management. Each year Revenue needs to develop and implement a series of urgent and strategically important ICT projects that support budgetary and legislative changes as introduced by the Government or the EU, very frequently within tight timeframes. The €24m can be summarised as follows:

IT Systems Development

Some €14m will be spent on IT Systems Development on the projects listed below. Completed in 2019:PAYE Modernisation Phase 1 [Q1 2019]Debt Management System [Q1 2019]Customs Performance Enhancements & Trade Facilitation [Q1 2019]LPT Re-evaluation Phase 1 [Q2 2019]Intelligence Management System [Q3 2019]LPT Re-evaluation Phase 1 [Q4 2019]PAYE Modernisation Phase 2 [Q4 2019]Commenced in 2019Union Customs Code Trust RegisterVAT eCommerceFile Management SystemUnique Business Identifier Register

€14m

Storage and Hardware

Revenue need to invest on an ongoing basis to replace end of life equipment. This includes storage and infrastructure hardware which ensures, among other things, that Revenue systems are available to the public on a near 24/7 basis and that Revenue staff can access critical data in real-time in both Revenue offices and in external locations.

€6m

Office Premises Expenses

This expenditure relates to required building works and furniture provision in respect of premises in need of repair works and modernisation. These works are identified and costed and planned for in advance.

€2m

Vehicles and Specialised Equipment.

This expenditure is mainly related to Revenue’s enforcement activities.

€2m

Question No. 67 answered with Question No. 59.

Tax Data

Ceisteanna (68)

Thomas P. Broughan

Ceist:

68. Deputy Thomas P. Broughan asked the Minister for Finance if he will report on the recent significant increase in non-domiciled registered tax units here; the estimated level of taxation foregone in this regard for 2018; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [6124/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Finance)

I am advised by Revenue that the number of resident non-domiciled taxpayers in Ireland in the period 2014-2016 is set out in the following table. Figures for 2017 will be available later in 2019, when tax returns for that year are processed. As the returns for 2018 will not be filed until late 2019, the information requested in respect of that year will not be available until 2020.

Taxpayers who are resident but non-domiciled in Ireland are liable to tax on their worldwide income, to the extent that it is either earned in, or remitted, into the State. Employment in the State is taxed under the PAYE system and other taxable income is returned on the person’s Form 11 or Form 12 as appropriate. As their relevant income is taxed in Ireland, the concept of tax foregone does not arise.

Tax Year

Number of Taxpayer Units

2014

5,597

2015

6,101

2016

7,262

Disabled Drivers and Passengers Scheme

Ceisteanna (69)

Charlie McConalogue

Ceist:

69. Deputy Charlie McConalogue asked the Minister for Finance if the criteria for the disabled drivers and passengers scheme will be amended in view of the concerns that have been outlined by the Ombudsman regarding the equity of the scheme (details supplied); and if he will make a statement on the matter. [6130/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Finance)

As you may be aware, the Disabled Drivers and Disabled Passengers (Tax Concessions) Scheme provides relief from VAT and VRT (up to a certain limit) on the purchase of an adapted car for transport of a person with specific severe and permanent physical disabilities, payment of a Fuel Grant, and an exemption from Motor Tax.

To qualify for the Scheme an applicant must be in possession of a Primary Medical Certificate. To qualify for a Primary Medical Certificate, an applicant must satisfy one of the following conditions:

- be wholly or almost wholly without the use of both legs;

- be wholly without the use of one leg and almost wholly without the use of the other leg such that the applicant is severely restricted as to movement of the lower limbs;

- be without both hands or without both arms;

- be without one or both legs;

- be wholly or almost wholly without the use of both hands or arms and wholly or almost wholly without the use of one leg;

- have the medical condition of dwarfism and have serious difficulties of movement of the lower limbs.

The Scheme represents a significant tax expenditure. Between the Vehicle Registration Tax and VAT foregone, and the fuel grant, the scheme cost €65m in each of 2016 and 2017, rising to €70m in 2018. This figure does not include the revenue foregone in respect of the relief from Motor Tax provided to members of the Scheme.

I understand and fully sympathise with any person who suffers from a serious physical disability and can’t access the scheme under the current criteria. However, given the scope and scale of the scheme, any possible changes to it can only be made after careful consideration, taking into account the existing and prospective cost of the scheme as well as the availability of other schemes which seek to help with the mobility of disabled persons, and the interaction between each of these schemes.

Accordingly, I have no plans to amend the qualifying medical criteria for the Disabled Drivers and Disabled Passengers Scheme at this time.

Disabled Drivers and Passengers Scheme

Ceisteanna (70)

Charlie McConalogue

Ceist:

70. Deputy Charlie McConalogue asked the Minister for Finance the number of applications received under the disabled drivers and passengers scheme in each of the past five years; the number of these which were successful and unsuccessful, respectively; the number of appeals submitted; the number of successful appeals; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [6131/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Finance)

I am advised by Revenue that the following table sets out the total number of applications received, approved and rejected under the Disabled Drivers and Disabled Passengers scheme for the years 2014 to 2018 (inclusive).

The table also includes the number of appeals received and the number that were successful for the years requested.

Year

Total Applications

No. of Approved Applications

No. of Rejected Applications

No. of Appeals Received

No. of Successful Appeals

2014

5,060

4,997

63

5

4

2015

5,494

5,440

54

15

9

2016

6,511

6,490

21

15

4

2017

6,080

6,052

28

13

10

2018

6,444

6,424

20

11

8

Office of the Comptroller and Auditor General

Ceisteanna (71)

Clare Daly

Ceist:

71. Deputy Clare Daly asked the Minister for Finance the number of discussion papers in regard to potential topics of value for money examinations prepared and submitted for consideration by the reporting directorate of the Comptroller and Auditor General in each of the years 2010 to 2018; and the number of discussion papers in each case that went on to be included in the list of topics for examination by the Comptroller and Auditor General in the subsequent year. [6160/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Finance)

The Comptroller and Auditor General is independent in the exercise of his functions and therefore my Department does not have the details requested.

The Deputy may wish to raise the matters directly with the Comptroller and Auditor General.

Brexit Issues

Ceisteanna (72, 74)

Michael McGrath

Ceist:

72. Deputy Michael McGrath asked the Minister for Finance the position regarding insurance policies held with insurance companies prudentially regulated in the UK or Gibraltar but operating here under freedom of services in the event of a no-deal Brexit; if such policies will be still valid; if new policies will be possible; if the issue will be fully dealt with in the miscellaneous provisions (withdrawal of the United Kingdom from the European Union on 29 March 2019) Bill; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [6175/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Michael McGrath

Ceist:

74. Deputy Michael McGrath asked the Minister for Finance the nature of temporary run-off regime in the event the UK leaving the EU on 29 March 2019; the way in which the regime interacts with EU law on insurance; if it will be possible for new business to be written by UK companies not prudentially regulated here; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [6177/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Finance)

I propose to take Questions Nos. 72 and 74 together.

As the Deputy will be aware, upon withdrawal from the EU and in the absence of a political agreement between the EU and the UK, UK (including Gibraltar) insurance undertakings and insurance distributors will lose their right to conduct business by way of Freedom of Establishment (FOE) and Freedom of Services (FOS) under the EU regulatory framework.

According to the European Insurance and Occupational Pensions Authority’s (EIOPA) Opinion of 28 June 2018, insurance contracts concluded before the Withdrawal date by UK undertakings by way of FOE or FOS are in principle valid after that date. What has been in doubt however is the ability of insurance undertakings and insurance distributors (i.e. brokers) to continue performing certain obligations and activities and ensure service continuity with regard to such contracts, e.g. pay out claims.

It is understood that a significant majority of UK/Gibraltar insurance undertakings have prepared appropriate Brexit contingency plans which are expected to be implemented in advance of Brexit. However, there is a legitimate concern, that a small number of such undertakings as well as a number of insurance distributors will either not have completed such contingency plans by the end of March 2019, or have made a decision not to implement them in the first place. Such a scenario as you will appreciate gives rise to a risk in respect of their ability to continue servicing the insurance policies they have sold.

Consequently, the focus of my Department and the Central Bank has been to find a solution to address this issue. The proposed solution, which is reflected in the General Scheme of the Miscellaneous Provisions (Withdrawal of the United Kingdom from the European Union on 29 March 2019) Bill, provides for a temporary run-off regime which, subject to a number of conditions, will enable impacted UK/Gibraltar insurance undertakings or insurance distributors to continue to provide services to their Irish customers for a period of 3 years after the date of the withdrawal of the UK from the EU. Both my Department and the Central Bank believe that this proposal is compatible and in line with the Solvency II Directive which sets out that the main objective of supervision is to ensure ‘adequate protection of policyholders and beneficiaries’.

The Deputy should also be aware that such insurance undertakings and insurance distributors will no longer be able to write new business in Ireland unless and until they obtain the relevant authorisation under the EU insurance supervisory regime.

The General Scheme of the legislation was published by the Tánaiste and Minister for Foreign Affairs and Trade on 24 January 2019 and can be viewed on his Department’s website at:

https://www.dfa.ie/media/dfa/eu/brexit/brexitnegotations/General-Scheme-of-Miscellaneous-Provisions.pdf .

My officials are currently working with the Central Bank of Ireland and the Office of the Parliamentary Counsel to develop Part 8 of that Scheme into the legislative provisions necessary to protect Irish policyholders from insurance contract continuity issues in the event of a hard Brexit.

Brexit Preparations

Question No. 74 answered with Question No. 72.

Ceisteanna (73)

Michael McGrath

Ceist:

73. Deputy Michael McGrath asked the Minister for Finance the consultation or engagement that has taken place between him and the insurance industry; the number of times in the past six months he has met with organisations (details supplied) on Brexit; the details of the meetings; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [6176/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Finance)

The Deputy will be aware that Brexit has implications across almost all sectors of the economy. Since the UK referendum, Brexit is an integral part of business planning in the Department of Finance and issues relating to Brexit are mainstreamed across all divisions of my Department. In this context, I meet and engage on an ongoing basis with my officials on issues linked to Brexit. The objective of my approach as Minister for Finance is to protect the economic and financial interests of the state and to support the work of the Revenue Commissioners so as to minimise disruption to trade to the greatest extent possible. These objectives are being advanced under four priority headings which are developing appropriate economic and budgetary policy advice; safeguarding financial stability through engagement with the CBI and the NTMA; assuring continued funding of the State by the NTMA and supporting the work of the Revenue Commissioners in the areas of customs, direct and indirect tax.

On the question as to what level of engagement I have had with the insurance industry in relation to Brexit, the Deputy should note that my colleague Minister of State D’Arcy has immediate responsibility, within my Department, for Financial Services and Insurance. As such while I have not had direct discussions with the industry, Minister D'Arcy has had a significant level of engagement, both with individual insurance companies, and with insurance industry bodies, during which Brexit has been discussed. This has included speaking at events held by insurance representative bodies, where Brexit related issues were on the agenda. In addition, I would note that the IFS2020 Strategy allows for structured dialogue with industry at the quarterly Joint Committee meetings, chaired by Minister of State D’Arcy, at which Brexit is a standing item on the agenda. My officials have also had close engagement with the insurance industry through various fora since the outcome of the 2016 UK referendum, where Brexit as an issue would have been raised.

It should be noted that the insurance industry has been clear from the outset of the potential difficulties that a hard Brexit may cause to policyholders and claimants from a contract continuity perspective. This has been conveyed through a range of forums including at EU level. However, the EU Commission has stated repeatedly that industry is responsible for ensuring that it is appropriately Brexit prepared. Accordingly, the Central Bank has engaged with the insurance industry and the UK regulatory authorities to ensure that this is the case and in a general sense this exercise has been successful.

My Department and the Central Bank have however been cognisant that not all insurers or brokers would be fully Brexit prepared and therefore since September have been considering what could be done to ensure that all policyholders are appropriately protected from a hard Brexit. The Miscellaneous Provisions (Withdrawal of the United Kingdom from the European Union on 29 March 2019) Bill 2019 , contains proposals which if enacted, will ensure that UK or Gibraltar authorised insurers will be deemed to have a limited authorisation for a period of three years after withdrawal. This will therefore allow policies written prior to Brexit in relation to risks in the State come under scope of the ICF subject to the terms and conditions of the Fund.

Question No. 74 answered with Question No. 72.

Insurance Industry

Ceisteanna (75)

Michael McGrath

Ceist:

75. Deputy Michael McGrath asked the Minister for Finance the number of insurance companies operating here under freedom of services which are prudentially regulated in the UK or Gibraltar by the type of insurance sold and the number of applications with the Central Bank from insurance companies wishing to be prudentially regulated here, respectively; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [6178/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Finance)

As Minister for Finance, I am responsible for the development of the legal framework governing financial regulation. The day to day supervision of insurance undertakings is a matter for the Central Bank of Ireland, and so I have consulted with it in respect of the information sought.

With regard to non-life insurance, I am informed by the Central Bank that as at 31 December 2017 (the most recent data they have), that there were 216 non-life insurance firms authorised to provide services in Ireland on a Freedom of Services (FOS) basis under the EU Solvency II framework from the United Kingdom and Gibraltar. I have been advised however that only 58 of these firms actually operate in Ireland. Of these, 48 were authorised in the United Kingdom and 10 were authorised in Gibraltar.

The types of non-life insurance written by UK firms included Motor, General Liability, Fire & Other property, Medical Expenses, Marine & Aviation, Credit & Suretyship, Miscellaneous Financial Loss, Income protection, Property, Assistance, Legal Expenses, Workers Compensation (Employer Liability), and Casualty. For Gibraltar firms, the types of business written are Motor, Miscellaneous Financial Loss, General Liability, Credit & Suretyship, Legal Expenses, Assistance, Fire & Other property, and Casualty insurance. In this regard, I understand that 87% of gross written premium written by UK firms was in respect of motor insurance, fire & other property insurance and general liability insurance, while 91% of the premium written by Gibraltar firms was in respect of motor insurance.

With regard to life insurance, I am informed by the Central Bank of Ireland that as at 31 December 2017, that there were 51 life insurance firms authorised or registered to provide services in Ireland on a Freedom of Services (FOS) basis under the EU Solvency II framework from the United Kingdom and Gibraltar. However, I understand that only 11 of them actually operate in Ireland, all of which are authorised in the United Kingdom.

Finally, the Central Bank has indicated that they are unable to comment on the number of applications from insurers wishing to be prudentially regulated here, however they have confirmed that they are continuing to review a number of such applications at this time.

Insurance Compensation Fund

Ceisteanna (76)

Michael McGrath

Ceist:

76. Deputy Michael McGrath asked the Minister for Finance the compensation mechanisms in place if after the UK leaves the EU an insurance company operating here under freedom of services but prudentially regulated in the UK or Gibraltar goes into liquidation; the way in which the Insurance (Amendment) Act 2018 applies in this scenario; if claimants in this instance would be entitled to 100% compensation; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [6179/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Finance)

The Irish Insurance Compensation Fund (ICF) was established under the Insurance Act 1964, (as amended) and operates as a host-based insurance guarantee scheme. This means that it is designed to facilitate payments due under a policy in relation to risks in the State where an Irish authorised non-life insurer or a non-life insurer authorised in another EU Member State goes into liquidation.

Once the UK leaves the EU, an insurance company regulated in the UK or Gibraltar, will no longer be able to write new insurance contracts in Ireland under freedom of services. If such companies wish to write new business here, they will need to obtain a relevant authorisation in Ireland, or another EU member state under the EU insurance regulatory framework.

The Miscellaneous Provisions (Withdrawal of the United Kingdom from the European Union on 29 March 2019) Bill 2019 , contains proposals which if enacted, will ensure that UK or Gibraltar authorised insurers will be deemed to have a limited authorisation for a period of three years after withdrawal. This will therefore allow policies written prior to Brexit in relation to risks in the State come under scope of the ICF subject to the terms and conditions of the Fund.

The Insurance Act 1964 (as amended) currently provides that claimants can be compensated by the ICF for 65% of the claim or €825,000, whichever is the lesser. However, in the case of third party motor insurance claims, the Insurance (Amendment) Act 2018 provides that the level of compensation from the ICF is increased to 100%, with the additional coverage financed by the motor insurance industry through the establishment of an ex-ante fund into which industry will make regular contributions.

Tax Deduction Systems

Ceisteanna (77)

Michael McGrath

Ceist:

77. Deputy Michael McGrath asked the Minister for Finance the status of the review on tax treatment of flat rate expenses; if these changes will come into force in 2020; if there are changes from the original proposal announced in 2018; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [6180/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Finance)

I am advised by Revenue that their review of the flat rate expenses (FRE) regime is ongoing and that it is intended to have the review completed by the end of 2019. It is not intended to further review the flat rate expense categories already identified as not meeting the statutory requirement for tax deduction, as set out in section 114 of the Taxes Consolidation Act 1997.

The Deputy will be aware from my previous replies on this matter that Revenue confirmed an implementation date of 1 January 2020 in respect of any changes that may be made to the flat rate regime, to ensure they do not impact on any specific group earlier than the rest. Revenue confirmed this position is unchanged.

NAMA Staff Data

Ceisteanna (78)

Darragh O'Brien

Ceist:

78. Deputy Darragh O'Brien asked the Minister for Finance the estimated number of NAMA staff who will transfer into Home Building Finance Ireland; the anticipated date of their transfer; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [6188/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Finance)

Similar to NAMA and the SBCI, all Home Building Finance Ireland (HBFI) officials will be seconded employees of the NTMA. In order to ensure that HBFI operates in the most efficient manner possible it is envisaged that the NTMA shall first draw upon any relevant resources, services and experience that are already available within the NTMA, including NAMA, when appointing staff to HBFI. NAMA has amassed considerable expertise in this area through the implementation of its existing residential funding programme and this will be a key asset for HBFI.

HBFI has an approved final headcount of 23 staff and is currently in the process of recruiting for 6 positions including the position of HBFI Chief Executive Officer. To date, 16 positions have been filled in HBFI (which will include 9 former NAMA officials). Of these 16 positions, 10 staff have already commenced working for HBFI with a further 6 staff commencing work in the coming weeks.

Revenue Documents

Ceisteanna (79)

Bernard Durkan

Ceist:

79. Deputy Bernard J. Durkan asked the Minister for Finance if a P21 will issue to a person (details supplied); and if he will make a statement on the matter. [6210/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Finance)

I am advised by Revenue that further information is required from the person in question before their tax situation can be fully determined.

Revenue requested this information from the person on 4 February but has not yet received a reply. Revenue also attempted to contact the person by telephone but received no reply. As soon as the information requested is provided Revenue will review the person’s tax situation and will issue the P21 statement.

Departmental Records

Ceisteanna (80)

Pearse Doherty

Ceist:

80. Deputy Pearse Doherty asked the Minister for Public Expenditure and Reform the reason for the actions by staff in his Department that have mistakenly altered documentation (details supplied) on the grounds that the national minimum wage was changed in January 2019 in view of the fact that the relevant pay scale is covered by the employment regulation orders for contract cleaning; when the contractor will be paid in full; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [5982/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Public)

The National Shared Services Office (NSSO) is a statutory office, established under the National Shared Services Office Act 2017. On 1 January 2018 the NSSO became a separate Civil Service office, under the aegis of the Department of Public Expenditure and Reform

The NSSO has advised the Department that they scrutinise every invoice submitted to ensure that the goods or services invoiced for have been delivered to the quality standards agreed and in full compliance with the terms of the contract and all relevant laws – including laws on the Minimum Wage and any sectorial agreements. From time to time, disputes can arise in relation to payment of invoices. In that case, the NSSO engages directly with the relevant party in order to expedite the resolution of the dispute pursuant to the terms of the contract at issue, obtaining legal advice where necessary.

Departmental Budgets

Ceisteanna (81, 82, 83)

Barry Cowen

Ceist:

81. Deputy Barry Cowen asked the Minister for Public Expenditure and Reform the breakdown of the €84,000 capital allocation under A public expenditure and sectoral policy division in Vote 11 of the budget 2019 expenditure report for 2019 by specific project; the projects that will be commenced in 2019; the projects that will be completed in 2019, in tabular form; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [6000/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Barry Cowen

Ceist:

82. Deputy Barry Cowen asked the Minister for Public Expenditure and Reform the breakdown of the €4,331,000 capital allocation under B public service management and reform in Vote 11 of the budget 2019 expenditure report for 2019 by specific project; the projects that will be commenced in 2019; the projects that will be completed in 2019, in tabular form; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [6001/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Barry Cowen

Ceist:

83. Deputy Barry Cowen asked the Minister for Public Expenditure and Reform the breakdown of the €587,000 capital allocation in the Office of Government Procurement for 2019, that is, Vote 39 of the budget 2019 expenditure report by specific project; the projects that will be commenced in 2019; the projects that will be completed in 2019, in tabular form; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [6002/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Public)

I propose to take Questions Nos. 81 to 83, inclusive, together.

The purpose of the capital investment undertaken by my Department, including the Office of Government Procurement (OGP), is to deliver greater effectiveness and efficiency across the Civil and Public Service, in the context of initiatives set out in reform plans such as Our Public Service 2020 and the Public Service ICT Strategy.

In 2019, Vote 11 (DPER) was allocated a capital investment budget of €4,415,000 and the main subheads investing this capital are the Office of the Government Chief Information Officer (OGCIO) and Civil Service Learning and Development Programme (OneLearning).

The OGCIO takes the lead on driving forward the implementation of the Public Service ICT Strategy, working with Departments and agencies across the Public Service, and has been allocated a capital budget of €3,500,000 in 2019. Capital investment in 2019 has been allocated to the five strategic themes of the strategy which are Build to Share, Digital First, Data as an Enabler, Improve Governance, and Increase Capability. For instance, under the Build to Share pillar of the Strategy, the OGCIO continues to enhance the Government Network that has been in existence for many years. As a result of this investment, the Network will operate at higher speeds, providing high capacity services to the wider Public Service. The enhanced network will support agencies in the roll-out of new applications, new ways of working and engaging with the citizen.

The 2019 OGCIO capital budget has been allocated to these areas:

- Build To Share Common Applications (€1,250,000)

- Build to Share Desk Top Services (€1,400,000)

- Government Networks Development (€700,000)

- Strategic IT Development and Capability (€150,000)

The Civil Service Learning and Development subhead has been allocated €600,000 to complete the development of the Learning Management IT System in the first half of 2019. This is a key element of the Civil Service Renew Plan, as the system will provide a common platform for staff to access all of their learning and development requirements.

The Department also has a 2019 admin capital budget of €315,000 for routine ongoing investment in its own technology and premises.

In 2019, Vote 39 (Office of Government Procurement) has been allocated a capital budget of €587,000. This allocation is for a mixture of project based and routine ongoing capital spend. The OGP will invest €312,000 in its IT systems to deliver on its mandate to drive procurement savings to the State. The two IT projects that the OGP is continuing to invest in are the eTenders platform to support national and EU procurement requirements and a CRM / Workflow Management System is also being implemented to support OGP’s Customer Service function and sourcing activities of the OGP and its sector partners.

The OGP has a 2019 admin capital budget of €275,000 for routine ongoing investment in its own technology and premises.

Departmental Budgets

Ceisteanna (84)

Barry Cowen

Ceist:

84. Deputy Barry Cowen asked the Minister for Public Expenditure and Reform the breakdown of the €76,262,000 capital allocation in the flood risk management division of the Office of Public Works, that is, Vote 13 of the budget 2019 expenditure report for 2019 by specific project; the projects that will be commenced in 2019; the projects that will be completed in 2019, in tabular form; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [6003/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Public)

The 2019 capital allocation for the Flood Risk Management area will allow (i) the continued implementation of the existing programme of flood relief projects and the Minor Flood Mitigation Works and Coastal Protection Scheme; (ii) the further development and progression of the initial prioritised tranche of projects arising from the Flood Risk Management Plans (FRMPs) launched in May 2018 and (iii) the continued work on a range of other programmes which include Home Relocation/Remedial Works, Second Cycle of the Flood Directive and the table below sets out the breakdown of projected expenditure in these areas for 2019:

Table A

Programme

Projected expenditure*

Existing Capital Projects to be at Construction stage during 2019 (including some post construction costs on completed schemes)

€55m

Existing Capital Projects at Design Stage

€6m

Minor Flood Mitigation Works and Coastal Protection Scheme

€3m

New Projects arising from Flood Risk Management Plans (FRMPs) - mainly design costs and other pre-construction costs. Some smaller new projects may reach construction stage in 2019.

€4m

Other Programmes

€8m

* The figures included in this table are broadly indicative estimates only and are subject to change

There are currently ten major projects at construction with five of these to be completed or substantially completed and operational by the end of 2019. These include, Bandon and Skibbereen in Co Cork, Ennis Lower in Co Clare and Claregalway and Dunkellin in Co Galway. Construction works currently underway on projects in Athlone in Co Westmeath, River Dodder in Dublin City, Clonakilty in Co Cork, Ashbourne in Co Meath and Templemore in Co Tipperary will continue beyond 2019.

The following major projects are currently scheduled to commence construction before the end of 2019:

- Blackpool, Co Cork

- Glashaboy, Co Cork

- Douglas, Co Cork

- Ennis South, Co Clare

- Lower Morell, Co Kildare

- Sandymount, Dublin City

In addition to these, a further 24 projects are currently in the existing Programme of Capital Flood Relief Projects which are being advanced though planning and design.

The design and planning of the initial tranche of projects arising from the Flood Risk Management Plans, launched in May of last year and which will form the bulk of the future Capital Programme, will progress during the course of this year as well. This comprises 26 medium to large projects with individual values between €1m and €40m along with 31 Small Projects whose individual value is under €1m.

Departmental Budgets

Ceisteanna (85)

Barry Cowen

Ceist:

85. Deputy Barry Cowen asked the Minister for Public Expenditure and Reform the breakdown of the €105,787,000 capital allocation in the estate management division of the Office of Public Works, that is, Vote 13 of the budget 2019 expenditure report for 2019 by specific project; the projects that will be commenced in 2019; the projects that will be completed in 2019, in tabular form; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [6004/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Public)

The information is contained in the following table:

2019 €m

Commencing 2019

Completed 2019

B.2 Admin Non-Pay

3,027

On going

B.3 Grants for Refurb works

250

On-going

B.4 Purchase of sites & buildings

3,480

On going

B.10 Unitary Payment*

25,000

On going

B.6 New Works Capital Budget

74,030

Total

105,787

B.6 New Works (Detail)

Estate Planning

250

On going

Architectural Services

1,800

On going

Garda Programmes

Athlone Garda Station 

5,200

On site

Portlaois Garda Station

1,200

Stage 4**

Donegal Garda Station

2,200

Commencing

Athlone Water Unit

1,000

Commencing 

Minor Works

1,000

On going

Cell Programme

2,500

On going

Fabric Upgrade

1,000

On going

Cultural 

Leinster House

8,200

On site

For completion

Cultural Institutions

2,630

On going 

 

Heritage

Historical Properties

3,000

On going

Failte Ireland Programme

2,000

On going

Universal Access Programme

1,700

On going

Mechanical & Electrical Programme

12,000

On going

Energy Conservation Prog

3,000

On going

Minor New Works

Private Security

750

On going

Health & Safety

500

On going

Fabric Upgrade

4,000

On going

Office Accommodation

Leeson Lane, D2

2,800

Commencing

Tom Johnson House, D4

300

Stage 4

Distillers Building, D7

100

Stage 4

The Landings, D1

700

Stage 4

OPW Headford, Galway

1,000

Commencing

22-25 Clare Street, D2

200

Stage 4

Merrion Sq/Fenian St, D2

200

Stage 4

94 Merrion Square, D2

50

Stage 4

Hawkins House, D1

2,500

Stage 4

Gov Buildings South Block

550

On site

For completion

Probation Services, Limerick

1,500

Stage 4

Infinity Building, D7

2,000

Commencing

TRA – Dundalk VMA

1,400

On site

For completion

Chancery Building, D8

500

Commencing

For completion

Block 5 & 6 Earlsfort Tce

1,900

Commencing

DEASP Programme 

2,400

On going

Miesian Plaza, D2

2,000

For completion

Total 

74,030

*Unitary Payment - A PPP Contract Award was made to Spencer Dock Convention Centre Dublin Ltd. (SDCCD)/PPP Co. in April 2007. OPW is the Contracting Authority and the Department of Transport, Tourism and Sport is the Sponsoring Department. The Convention Centre Dublin (CCD) opened in September 2010. PPP Co. are responsible for operating the Centre for a 25-year concession period. The Building is owned by the State, and PPP Co. operate the facility under a Project Agreement (PA). The building is due to be handed back to the State in 2035. Under the PA, the State will pay for the CCD over 25 years by means of Unitary Charges (UC).

** Stage 4 – Planning/ design including procurement

Departmental Budgets

Ceisteanna (86)

Barry Cowen

Ceist:

86. Deputy Barry Cowen asked the Minister for Public Expenditure and Reform the breakdown of the €2,500,000 capital allocation in the Public Appointments Service, that is, Vote 17 of the budget 2019 expenditure report for 2019 by specific project; the projects that will be commenced in 2019; the projects that will be completed in 2019, in tabular form; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [6005/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Public)

Vote 17 - PAS 2019 Capital Allocation

2019 Provision

Purpose

Overview of capital investment works to be undertaken

€1,500,000

Funding for essential upgrade works on Chapter House

This funding will be utilised to carry out essential improvement works at Chapter House in 2019 with the dual purpose of improving the functional specification of the building, and to ensure that the building is a reflection of the professional, modern and progressive image we hope to portray in terms of careers in the civil and public service.

€1,000,000

Funding for investment in PAS’s centralised online IT Recruitment Platform which is nearing end of life and needs to be replaced.

PAS’s IT Recruitment Platform which has been operational for over 10 years is central to the delivery of PAS recruitment services to the public and to client Departments and Offices. The Platform is in urgent need of replacement.

The replacement platform (Project Nova) is to be commenced in 2019 and delivered over the next three years, and will be future proofed to meet evolving business requirements and recruitment demands.

The €1 million amount provided in 2019 is the first tranche of the investment in the replacement Nova Recruitment Platform.