After-School Support Service Provision

Ceisteanna (99)

Michael Healy-Rae

Ceist:

99. Deputy Michael Healy-Rae asked the Minister for Education and Skills if a school (details supplied) will be permitted to use its property for a privately owned after-school service; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [27084/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Education)

I can confirm to the Deputy that the school in question has very recently contacted my Department in relation to this matter. The matter is under consideration and a response will issue to the school authority shortly.

Student Grant Scheme Eligibility

Ceisteanna (100)

Peter Burke

Ceist:

100. Deputy Peter Burke asked the Minister for Education and Skills if he will direct SUSI to amend the grant adjacency rates and restore it to the previous 24 km limit, instead of the current 42 km, which is acting as a barrier to third level education for many students in the midlands; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [27087/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Education)

The student maintenance grant is a contribution towards the living costs of a student. It is not intended to cover the full costs of attending college. The student grant scheme does however, provide for different levels of maintenance support, depending on means. Grants are also provided at adjacent and non-adjacent rates. The higher non-adjacent rates are intended to provide additional support to those students who may be living away from home.

Budget 2011 provided for a number of student grant measures which came into effect for the 2011/12 academic year, including the change in the assessment of the qualifying distance criterion for the non-adjacent rate of grant from 24 kilometres to 45 kilometres.

The 24km distance criterion was originally set in 1968 and had not been updated in more than 40 years. Since then, significant improvements have taken place in the road and rail network and it is considered that the revised distance criteria is more consistent with the type of distances that students may legitimately be expected to commute to college.

The current qualifying distance of 45km for the higher non-adjacent rate of student grant takes into account a reasonable radius within which students may commute on a daily basis.

Students in third-level institutions experiencing exceptional financial need can apply for support under the Student Assistance Fund. This Fund assists students, in a sensitive and compassionate manner, who might otherwise be unable to continue their third level studies due to their financial circumstances. Information on the fund is available through the Access Office in the third level institution attended. This fund is administered on a confidential, discretionary basis.

Sick Pay Scheme

Ceisteanna (101)

Michael Fitzmaurice

Ceist:

101. Deputy Michael Fitzmaurice asked the Minister for Education and Skills the reason payment is being withheld from a person (details supplied); and if he will make a statement on the matter. [27091/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Education)

Further to my previous reply to the Deputy, officials in my Department have been liaising with the National Shared Services Offices (NSSO) who have responsibility for pay matters generally. The NSSO has advised that payments have not been withheld from the person in question. The staff member’s salary comprises of her Temporary Remuneration Rehabilitation (TRR) payment and an Illness Benefit payment from the Department of Employment Affairs and Social Protection paid through the NSSO. Staff from my Department's HR Unit have been in touch with the staff member and following my request, the NSSO will also make contact with her to advise her of the position and to outline the process behind her payments generally.

Special Educational Needs Service Provision

Ceisteanna (102)

Anne Rabbitte

Ceist:

102. Deputy Anne Rabbitte asked the Minister for Education and Skills if single-sex schools are open to apply for funding to construct ASD units; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [27116/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Education)

Enabling children with Special Educational Needs including Autism to receive an education appropriate to their needs is a priority for me and the Government.

We have significantly increased the availability of special placements for children with special educational needs as well as bringing more and more children into mainstream education.

The number of ASD special classes has more than doubled in the last 5 years from 511 in 2014 to 1,196 across the country now. Provision in special schools has increased from 6,848 placements in 2011 to 7,872 this year. The National Council for Special Education (NCSE) has informed my Department that they intend to establish approx. 156 new ASD special classes nationally for 2019/20 school year to meet currently identified need.

The NCSE has a statutory function to plan and co-ordinate the provision of education and support services to children with special educational needs, in consultation with the relevant education partners and the Health Service Executive (HSE).

This includes the establishment of special class and special school placements in various geographical areas where there is an identified need.

In deciding where to establish a special class in an area, the NCSE take account of the current and projected demand and the available school accommodation both current and planned.

The NCSE ensures that schools in an area can, between them, cater for all children who have been identified as needing special class placements.

Individual school boards of management are responsible for the establishment of special classes. It is open to any school to make application to the National Council for Special education (NCSE) to establish a special class.

When the NCSE sanction a special class in a school, the school can apply to my Department for capital funding to re-configure existing spaces within the school building to accommodate the class and/or to construct additional accommodation.

Similarly, where special schools wish to expand provision, the school can apply to my Department for capital funding to accommodate additional placements.

The new power to compel schools to make additional special education provision available has yet to be invoked.

While the NCSE and the Department continue to encourage stakeholders to open special classes, the process under the admissions legislation will continue and may lead to interaction with education providers entering a more formal process.

The NCSE is currently undertaking Policy Advice on Education Provision in Special Classes and Special Schools to examine whether placement in specialist settings brings about improved educational outcomes and experiences, relative to their ability, for students with special educational needs. This Policy Advice is to be completed and a report submitted to the Minister no later than June 2020.

Parents who need assistance/advice or who are experiencing difficulties in locating a specialised placement, should contact their local SENO. All local SENO the contact details are available on the NCSE website at http://ncse.ie/seno-contact-list

Ensuring that every child has a suitable placement available to them from September is a key priority for this Government.

School Catchment Areas

Ceisteanna (103)

Joan Collins

Ceist:

103. Deputy Joan Collins asked the Minister for Education and Skills the reason there has been no contact with a group (details supplied) on expanding the catchment area of the Harold's Cross school site to include Dublin 8 and Dublin 12. [27132/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Education)

I can confirm that a comprehensive response issued to the representatives of the group referred to by the Deputy on the 7th May.

As the Deputy will be aware, in 2018 a new 1,000 pupil co-educational, multi-denominational school under the patronage of Educate Together was established to serve the Dublin 8 school planning area, along with the Dublin2_Dublin4 and Dublin6_Clonskeagh school planning areas as a regional solution.

In April 2018, the Government also announced plans for the establishment of 42 new schools over the next four years (2019 to 2022), including new post-primary schools for areas adjacent to Dublin 8 and Dublin 12 as follows:

- a new 1,000 pupil post-primary school to be established in 2020 as a regional solution to serve the Dublin 6_Clonskeagh and Dublin_6W school planning areas; and

- a new 600 pupil post-primary school to be established in 2021 to serve the Dublin 2_Dublin 4 school planning area.

All new schools established since 2011 to meet demographic demand are required, in the first instance, to prioritise pupil applications from within the designated school planning area(s) which the school was established to serve. This does not preclude schools from enrolling pupils from outside of the designated school planning area where they have sufficient places.

These new schools will reduce pressure on schools in the adjacent school planning areas, including the Dublin 8 and 12 areas. I understand that the existing schools in the Dublin 8 and Dublin 12 school planning areas have capacity to accommodate demand in the area at present.

The Deputy may wish to note that the patronage model of the post-primary schools due to open in 2020 and 2021 has not yet been decided. Patronage processes for the new schools will be undertaken in advance of their opening and will be open to all patron bodies.

The Deputy may also wish to note that City of Dublin ETB and Educate Together have been working together in relation to extending the co-educational and multi-denominational educational provision at second level schools in Dublin 12 and Dublin 7. I understand that significant progress has been made in this regard and work is planned to continue over the summer period. I am supportive of this initiative which has the potential to add to and enhance the availability of additional choice in these areas and my Department is engaging with the bodies concerned in this regard. This initiative represents an opportunity to increase diversity of provision in existing schools in areas where a new school is not required.

Schools Site Acquisitions

Ceisteanna (104)

John Lahart

Ceist:

104. Deputy John Lahart asked the Minister for Education and Skills further to Parliamentary Question No. 160 of 14 May 2019, if it is planned that the proposed post-primary school for Citywest will be built on the same site (details supplied); if so, the precise location; if the ownership of the site by the ETB will influence or not the patronage of the proposed new school; if he envisages a permanent building in terms of accommodating the proposed post-primary school on the site; if so, when commencement of such a project will take place; the length of time before the school will open; if a temporary building is envisaged, when and for the length of time; and the facilities such a temporary accommodation would be in place for. [27133/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Education)

As the Deputy will be aware, the Government announced plans in April 2018 for the establishment of 42 new schools over the next four years (2019 to 2022) including a new 1,000 pupil post-primary school to be established in September 2020 to serve the Tallaght & Newcastle_Rathcoole school planning areas (Citywest/Saggart) as a regional solution.

The ETB-owned site at Fortunestown Lane, on which two existing primary schools are currently temporarily located is the preferred site.

A patronage process for the new post-primary school in Citywest/Saggart, will be run later this year, significantly ahead of its due opening. This patronage process will be open to all patron bodies and prospective patrons. Parental preferences for each patron, from parents of children who reside in the school planning areas concerned, together with the extent of diversity currently available in these areas, are key to decisions in relation to the outcome of this process.

The new Online Patronage Process System (OPPS) has been developed by my Department to provide objective information to all parents and guardians which will allow them to make an informed choice in expressing a preference for their preferred model of patronage for their child’s education.

The patronage process for new schools is overseen by an external independent advisory group, the New Schools Establishment Group (NSEG). Following their consideration of my Department’s assessment reports, the NSEG will submit a report with recommendations to me for consideration and final decision. The assessment reports and the NSEG recommendations for all such patronage processes are made available on my Department's website.

Updates in relation to further patronage processes will be announced on the OPPS website (https://patronage.education.gov.ie/) and my Department’s website (www.education.ie ).

The project to deliver the new school building is currently at the architectural planning stage. As this project will be subject to the statutory planning process and standard procurement procedures it is not possible at this point to indicate a timeframe for its delivery. If necessary, the school will open in September 2020 in suitable interim accommodation.

Student Grant Scheme Eligibility

Ceisteanna (105)

Robert Troy

Ceist:

105. Deputy Robert Troy asked the Minister for Education and Skills if residents of an accommodation centre are eligible for a SUSI grant or other educational grants. [27146/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Education)

The Pilot Support Scheme was introduced by my Department in 2015 for students who are in the Protection System or at the Leave to Remain (but not deportation order) stage. This was one of the recommendations contained in the report by the Working Group on the Protection Process which was chaired by former High Court judge Dr Bryan McMahon.

The scheme provides supports to qualifying students which are similar to those available in the statutory based Student Grant Scheme.

Following a review of the Pilot Support Scheme 2018, I announced my decision to continue the scheme for the 2019/20 academic year and to undertake a further review in 2020.

To qualify for the pilot scheme, prospective students have to meet a number of criteria, including a requirement to:

- Meet the definition of a protection applicant or a person at leave to remain stage (other than those at the deportation order stage);

- Obtained their Leaving Certificate;

- Have been accepted on an approved Post Leaving Certificate course or an approved undergraduate course;

- Have attended a minimum of three academic years in the Irish school system and have been part of an application for protection or leave to remain for a combined period of 3 years prior to the 31st of August of the first year of their course.

Passport Controls

Ceisteanna (106)

Maureen O'Sullivan

Ceist:

106. Deputy Maureen O'Sullivan asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the way in which he can address the continued complaints of persons that deem the length of queue times for Dublin Airport passport control unsatisfactory; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [26840/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Justice)

I am advised by the Irish Naturalisation and Immigration Service (INIS) of my Department, who operate the front line Immigration Service at Dublin Airport, that over 90% of all passengers are processed through immigration control in a matter of minutes. This percentage figure is significantly higher for Irish passengers and passengers of other EU nationalities. This data is provided by the Dublin Airport Authority (DAA) who monitor overall passenger movements through the airport.

This is in the context of passenger numbers at Dublin Airport reaching record levels last year with over 31.5 million passengers using the airport. Throughput times compares very favourably with airports in other similar jurisdictions. The number of complaints received directly by INIS in relation to delays is extremely small considering the overall volume of passengers per annum.

To cater for the increase in numbers, additional Immigration Officers have been recruited for Dublin Airport and the allocation of personnel is designed to have the maximum number of staff on duty during the peak periods so that all available immigration booths are operational at these times. Every effort is made by Immigration Officers to exercise their function as speedily as possible, consistent with the requirement to protect Irish borders and facilitate the movement of legitimate passengers.

In addition, automatic border control ‘eGates’ have been operational at Dublin Airport since November 2017. Over 2.5 million passengers availed of the eGates in 2018, including 1.3 million Irish passport holders. So far in 2019, over 700,000 passengers have availed of the eGates. The eGates in Terminal 1 and Terminal 2 have recently been upgraded to facilitate speedier processing and passengers with Irish passport cards can now avail of them.

However, as with all major airports, specific pressure points can arise, often outside of the control of the immigration authorities, that can lengthen the time it takes for passengers to be processed. For example, this arises when a very high number of flights arrive within a specific time period, with consequent increases to passenger numbers during these peak times. This situation can be compounded when, in addition to scheduled arrivals, delayed flights also land during these peak periods.

While the immigration authorities at Dublin Airport have no control over the number of flights, their scheduling or actual arrival times, they have an excellent relationship with the DAA and with air carriers. All parties work closely together across a number of fronts to address capacity and queue management where they arise to alleviate congestion, to maximise passenger throughput, and ensure waiting times are kept to a minimum.

Sexual Offences Data

Ceisteanna (107)

Maureen O'Sullivan

Ceist:

107. Deputy Maureen O'Sullivan asked the Minister for Justice and Equality his views on reports that violence against sex workers has increased substantially since the enactment of the Criminal Law (Sexual Offences) Act 2017; if his attention has been drawn to the fact that the aims of the Act have not had the desired effect, as highlighted by an organisation (details supplied); and if he will make a statement on the matter. [26842/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Justice)

In relation to the Criminal Law (Sexual Offences) Act 2017, Part 4 of the Act provides for two new offences of paying for sexual activity with a prostitute and paying for sexual activity with a trafficked person. The Act also removes those who offer their services as a prostitute from the existing offences of soliciting for the purpose of prostitution.

A fundamental focus in the introduction of this legislation was to ensure that the women working in the prostitution sector would have increased protection and face no repercussions for reporting crimes related to their work. In relation to the Deputy's reference to violence against women providing sexual services, I would encourage anyone who has been the subject of a violent crime to report that incident to An Garda Síochána, and for any group with evidence of such crimes to present any data to An Garda Síochána.

Part 4 of the 2017 Act is due to be reviewed in early 2020, and will include an assessment of the impact on the welfare of those who engage in sexual activity for payment, as well as statistics on prosecutions and convictions. My Department has made funding available for research into the impact of the legislative changes.

Garda Transport Provision

Ceisteanna (108)

Maureen O'Sullivan

Ceist:

108. Deputy Maureen O'Sullivan asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the number of additional Garda community support vans purchased to date in 2019; the Garda districts that they have been attached to; and if additional Garda community support vans are due to be purchased later in 2019. [26843/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Justice)

The resources provided by Government to An Garda Síochána have reached unprecedented levels, with an allocation for 2019 of €1.76 billion. Very significant capital investment is also being made in An Garda Síochána, including a total of €46 million for investment in the Garda fleet between 2016 and 2021. This continuing investment is intended to ensure that An Garda Síochána can be mobile, visible and responsive on the roads and in the community to prevent and tackle crime.

The Deputy may also wish to be aware that a total of €10 million has been made available for the purchase and fit-out of Garda vehicles in 2019. I understand from the Garda authorities that this allocation will be used for purchase and fit-out of over 300 new vehicles for operational use this year.

As the Deputy will appreciate, in accordance with the Garda Síochána Act 2005 as amended, the Garda Commissioner is responsible for managing and controlling the administration and business of An Garda Síochána. Further, the allocation of Garda resources is a matter for the Commissioner, in light of identified operational demands. This includes responsibility for the allocation of Garda vehicles among the various Garda divisions. As Minister, I have no role in these matters. I am assured, however, that Garda management keeps the distribution of resources under continual review in the context of crime trends and policing priorities so as to ensure their optimum use.

In relation to vehicles for community support, I am informed by the Garda authorities that three mini buses have been purchased and added to the Garda fleet in 2019 and that these vehicles have been allocated by Garda management to the Cork West Division, Cork City Division and Westmeath Division. I am further informed that two mini buses and one custom fit-out van (currently being used as a community support van) were purchased in 2018 and were allocated to the DMR North, DMR West and DMR North Central respectively.

Finally, I am advised by the Garda authorities that they currently have no plans to purchase any further vehicles of this type this year.

Courts Service Properties

Ceisteanna (109)

Brendan Griffin

Ceist:

109. Deputy Brendan Griffin asked the Minister for Justice and Equality if consideration will be given to making a premises (details supplied) in County Kerry available to the community; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [26949/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Justice)

As the Deputy is aware, under the provisions of the Courts Service Act 1998, management of the courts, including the provision of accommodation for court sittings, is the responsibility of the Courts Service, which is independent in exercising its functions.

However, in order to be of assistance to the Deputy, I have had enquiries made and the Courts Service has informed me that the premises referred to by the Deputy is no longer used for court sittings.

The Courts Service understands that the building is still owned by the local authority and any enquiries as to its current or future use should be addressed to them.

Immigration Status

Ceisteanna (110)

Bernard Durkan

Ceist:

110. Deputy Bernard J. Durkan asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the progress to date in determining residency status in the case of a person (details supplied); and if he will make a statement on the matter. [26973/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Justice)

I am advised by the Irish Naturalisation and Immigration Service (INIS) of my Department that, in response to a notification pursuant to the provisions of Section 3 of the Immigration Act 1999 (as amended), written representations have been submitted on behalf of the person concerned.

These representations, together with all other information and documentation on file, will be fully considered, under Section 3 (6) of the Immigration Act 1999 (as amended) and all other applicable legislation, in advance of a final decision being made.

Queries in relation to the status of individual immigration cases may be made directly to the INIS of my Department by e-mail using the Oireachtas Mail facility which has been specifically established for this purpose. This service enables up to date information on such cases to be obtained without the need to seek information by way of the Parliamentary Questions process. The Deputy may consider using the e-mail service except in cases where the response from the INIS is, in the Deputy’s view, inadequate or too long awaited.

Naturalisation Applications

Ceisteanna (111)

Éamon Ó Cuív

Ceist:

111. Deputy Éamon Ó Cuív asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the reason a person (details supplied) who was informed of being granted citizenship on 4 October 2017 and paid a fee of €1,000 has not been informed of a citizenship ceremony that the person can attend in order that the process can be completed; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [27013/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Justice)

I am advised by the Irish Naturalisation and Immigration Service (INIS) of my Department that the application for a certificate of naturalisation from the person referred to by the Deputy continues to be processed. If further documentation is required it will be requested from the applicant in due course.

As the Deputy will appreciate, the granting of Irish citizenship through naturalisation is a privilege and an honour which confers certain rights and entitlements not only within the State but also at European Union level and it is important that appropriate procedures are in place to preserve the integrity of the process.

It is recognised that all applicants for citizenship would wish to have a decision on their application without delay. The nature of the naturalisation process is such that, for a broad range of reasons, some cases will take longer than others to process. In some instances, completing the necessary checks can take a considerable period of time, which may be outside the direct control of INIS.

Queries in relation to the status of individual immigration cases may be made directly to the INIS of my Department by e-mail using the Oireachtas Mail facility, which has been specifically established for this purpose. This service enables up to date information on such cases to be obtained without the need to seek information by way of the Parliamentary Questions process. The Deputy may consider using the e-mail service except in cases where the response from the INIS is, in the Deputy’s view, inadequate or too long awaited.

Oireachtas Joint Committee Reports

Ceisteanna (112)

Anne Rabbitte

Ceist:

112. Deputy Anne Rabbitte asked the Minister for Justice and Equality his views on the recommendations of the Report on the Right to Die With Dignity, published in June 2018 by the Joint Oireachtas Committee on Justice and Equality; the status of progress made further to recommendations of the report; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [27108/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Justice)

The legal position in this jurisdiction in relation to assisted suicide is that it is an offence, under Section 2(2) of the Criminal Law (Suicide) Act 1993, to assist another person in taking his or her life. The offence was created in order to safeguard the lives of individuals who are nearing the end of their lives and who might be vulnerable or at risk of abuse. Prosecution of the offence, which can result in a term of imprisonment of up to 14 years, is at the sole discretion of the Director of Public Prosecutions (DPP).

The constitutionality of the legislation was upheld by the Supreme Court in its judgment in Fleming v Ireland and Others delivered on 29 April 2013. While acknowledging the very distressing situation of Ms. Fleming, the Court held that there is no constitutional right to commit suicide or to arrange for the ending of one’s life at a time of one’s choosing. The Court also found that the prohibition on assisted suicide was not discriminatory and was not contrary to the European Convention on Human Rights. As a consequence of the judgment, the offence of assisting another to take his or her life remains in place.

The Oireachtas Joint Committee on Justice and Equality, in June 2018, published a Report on the Right to Die with Dignity. The Committee reported that, in the course of its hearings, it did not achieve a clear consensus as to whether legislative change was justified and that it was not, therefore, in a position to recommend legislative change at that time. The Irish Association for Palliative Care appeared before the Committee and also expressed the view that there should be no change in the law to allow assisted suicide or euthanasia and set out its reasoning in that regard.

Assisted suicide is a very complex issue which gives rise not only to criminal justice issues but also to constitutional, medical, ethical and moral issues. The competing interests of the individual would have to be balanced with the wider public interest in safeguarding persons who are nearing the end of their lives and who might be vulnerable and at risk of abuse. As such, the Minister has no plans to review the existing legislation.

The Committee made a number of recommendations, including that the Houses of the Oireachtas consider referring the issue to the Citizens’ Assembly for deliberation.

Private Security Authority

Ceisteanna (113, 114, 115)

Anne Rabbitte

Ceist:

113. Deputy Anne Rabbitte asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the structures in place to monitor the provision of licences by the Private Security Authority to those working as a door supervisor (licensed premises) or door supervisor (event security); and if he will make a statement on the matter. [27109/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Anne Rabbitte

Ceist:

114. Deputy Anne Rabbitte asked the Minister for Justice and Equality if there are different criteria for those licensed by the Private Security Authority as a door supervisor (licensed premises) or door supervisor (event security) for events held for persons aged under 18 years of age; if such supervisors are required to be Garda vetted; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [27110/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Anne Rabbitte

Ceist:

115. Deputy Anne Rabbitte asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the number of door supervisor (licensed premises) licences issued by county in each of the years 2014 to 2018 and to date in 2019, in tabular form; the number of door supervisor (licensed premises) licences issued by which applicants completed a requirement (details supplied) or equivalent in each county; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [27111/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Justice)

I propose to take Questions Nos. 113 to 115, inclusive, together.

The Private Security Authority (PSA), established under the Private Security Services Act 2004, as amended, is the regulatory body with responsibility for regulating and licensing the private security industry in the State.

The PSA is an independent body under the aegis of my Department. I have no involvement in the day-to-day operations of the Authority. My Department has an annual governance oversight agreement with the Authority which, inter alia, sets out key objectives and targets to be achieved on an annual basis.

The Private Security Services Act 2004 (as amended) sets out the security services licensable by the Authority. The Authority licences both contractors and employees in the security industry and licensing is being introduced on a phased basis to the security industry. One of the security services prescribed in the legislation is that of door supervisor. The door supervisor sector is licensable under a number of sub-categories, one of which is ‘Licensed Premises’.

Licensing of contractors in the Door Supervisor (Licensed Premises) sector commenced on 19 December 2005 and in the Door Supervisor (Event Security) sector on 1 November 2014. Employee licensing for the Door Supervisor (Licensed Premises) sector commenced on 1 September 2006. Licensing of employees in the Door Supervisor (Event Security) sector has not yet commenced. All employees seeking a licence in the Door Supervisor (Licensed Premises) sector must obtain the prescribed qualification Guarding Skills QQI Level 4 Minor Award or Door Security Procedures QQI Level 4 Minor Award or an equivalent qualification.

I can inform the Deputy that contractors in these sectors must adhere to the PSA Licensing Requirements Document – PSA 28:2013 Door Supervision and Security Guarding and PSA Licensing Requirements Document – PSA 39:2014 Event Security respectively. As part of the licensing regime contractors are audited annually to these Requirements Documents by an auditing body approved by the PSA. Part of such audits is verifying that contractors have the necessary protocols and supervisory checks for their individual operatives.

The Private Security Authority have 5 regional Inspectors. These Inspectors, amongst other inspection duties, carry out unannounced checks on licensed premises throughout the country to ensure that individuals in the Door Supervisor (licensed premises) are properly licensed. The Inspectors also undertake inspections of contractors to ensure compliance with the relevant Requirements Documents.

All new applicants for contractor and employee licences are vetted by the National Vetting Bureau in relation to their suitability to hold a PSA licence and existing licence holders are re-vetted periodically.

I am advised that work on the licensing of employees in the Door Supervisor (Event Security) sector is underway. A public consultation on the licensing requirements which should apply to the sector was undertaken in August 2018. The Authority expect to announce further details on the licensing of the sector in the coming months.

The Deputy may also wish to note that the licensing decisions made by the Authority are subject to appeal by the Private Security Appeal Board under Section 40 of the Private Security Services Act, 2004 (as amended).

The attached table shows a breakdown of Door Supervisor (Licensed Premises) licences granted by county and by year.

Door Supervisor (Licensed Premises) licences granted by county and by year

County

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019 (up to 21/06/2019)

Carlow

131

126

132

128

166

98

Cavan

125

142

140

150

175

89

Clare

202

201

212

227

263

153

Cork

1206

1260

1250

1237

1498

777

Donegal

258

263

270

291

343

121

Dublin

3922

3735

3551

3759

4619

3788

Galway

748

750

699

742

909

339

Kerry

289

340

364

373

443

200

Kildare

426

435

453

506

603

459

Kilkenny

145

139

127

129

163

90

Laois

194

218

221

229

300

167

Leitrim

73

74

68

87

106

37

Limerick

428

457

493

506

627

410

Longford

110

107

132

166

203

100

Louth

307

300

320

359

463

285

Mayo

312

311

322

285

334

145

Meath

333

340

354

368

430

317

Monaghan

158

162

152

135

155

64

Offaly

186

179

178

175

218

136

Roscommon

117

126

125

133

166

91

Sligo

143

146

154

158

197

84

Tipperary

267

287

275

296

355

198

Waterford

227

265

298

338

431

195

Westmeath

161

165

180

234

288

162

Wexford

234

261

290

328

395

168

Wicklow

225

239

232

229

287

209

Northern Ireland

61

59

65

80

88

44

GB (excl. NI)

4

2

5

5

4

4

Other

0

0

0

0

2

2

Totals

10992

11089

11062

11653

14231

8932