Question No. 927 answered with Question No. 925.

Question No. 928 answered with Question No. 917.

Employment Support Services

Question No. 930 answered with Question No. 917.

Ceisteanna (929)

Caoimhghín Ó Caoláin

Ceist:

929. Deputy Caoimhghín Ó Caoláin asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the status of the comprehensive employment strategy for people with disabilities; the actions implemented; the actions that remain to be implemented; his plans to implement the strategy in full; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [33842/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Justice)

As the Deputy will be aware, the Comprehensive Employment Strategy is a 10-year, whole-of-government strategy aimed at improving employment outcomes for persons with disabilities who wish to work. 

The Strategy’s six strategic priorities are:

- Build skills, capacity and independence

- Provide bridges and supports into work

- Make work pay

- Promote job retention and re-entry to work

- Provide co-ordinated and seamless support

- Engage employers 

The implementation of the Strategy is monitored by the Comprehensive Employment Strategy Implementation Group which is independently chaired and meets on a bi-monthly basis to monitor and oversee implementation of the Strategy, with the Chair preparing an annual independent report on implementation each year.  The Group is made up of senior representatives from Government Departments, the National Disability Authority and from the Disability sector.

The foundation phase of the Strategy has been completed, and a variety of key actions have been progressed, e.g. publication of the Make Work Pay report, review of career guidance, research on vocational rehabilitation in other jurisdictions, on-going work to improve the accessibility of public transport etc.

The second three-year action plan has now been agreed by the Implementation Group.  It will incorporate the next set of strategic priorities, continuing progress on any actions requiring further work, and new actions to support continued progress in achieving the goals of the Strategy. A suite of indicators has been developed by the National Disability Authority to allow measurement of outcomes at a high level over the lifetime of the Strategy.  This will enable progress to be tracked on each action.  It is my intention that all actions will be completed by the end of the second action plan.

Question No. 930 answered with Question No. 917.

Legal Aid Service Data

Ceisteanna (931)

Niall Collins

Ceist:

931. Deputy Niall Collins asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the budgets for criminal and civil legal aid by county each of the years 2011 to 2018 and to date in 2019; the number of persons refused criminal legal aid in each of the years by county; the number of persons awaiting civil legal aid by county; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [33903/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Justice)

As the Deputy will be aware, the modalities for the provision of Legal Aid differ between Civil Legal Aid and Criminal Legal Aid and I will deal with each in turn in responding to his question.

Criminal Legal Aid

Under the Criminal Justice (Legal Aid) Act 1962, it is the Courts, through the judiciary, that are responsible for the granting of legal aid.  An applicant for criminal legal aid must establish to the satisfaction of the Court that his/her means are insufficient to enable him/her to pay for legal representation for him/herself.  The Court must also be satisfied that, by reason of the gravity of the charge or exceptional circumstances, it is essential in the interests of justice that the applicant should have legal aid.

Statistics for expenditure on criminal legal aid are not compiled in such a manner as to readily identify expenditure on a county by county basis. Expenditure on criminal legal aid in each of the years 2011 to 2019 (June 2019) is set out in the following table:

Year

Expenditure €m

2011

56.116

2012

50.534

2013

50.863

2014

49.890

2015

50.879

2016

52.998

2017

58.139

2018

64.806

2019 (June 2019)

31.273 (June 2019)

I am advised by the  Courts Service that it is not able to provide statistics in respect of the refusal of applications for criminal legal aid by the courts.

Civil Legal Aid

The provision of civil legal aid in the State is delivered by the Legal Aid Board pursuant to the Civil Legal Aid Act 1995 and the Civil Legal Aid Regulations 1996 to 2017. The Board operates 30 full time law centres and a number of part time law centres in Ireland. The Board also provides mediation services to help separating couples to negotiate their own agreement.

The majority of the Board's income consists of a grant received from my Department. This funding is used to provide the Board's services in all its offices across the country, as well as the support services provided to law centres centrally from the Board's head office.

As with criminal legal aid  it is not possible to extract and isolate the total cost of civil legal aid in any one office/county in a given year. To do so, it would be necessary to devise a basis on which to attribute, to each county, all expenditure incurred by the Legal Aid Board centrally.

With regard to the delivery of civil legal aid, complexities may also arise at local level. For example a client living in County Limerick may choose to apply for legal aid to Ennis Law Centre. It is also important to note that in a case where two parties to a dispute seek the services of the Board at one law centre, one of the parties concerned will be required to engage with a different law centre, which may be in a neighbouring county.

Funding provided to the Legal Aid Board by my Department for the years 2011-2019 is set out in the following table:

Year  

Budget Allocation €m

2011

30.370

2012

32.922

2013

33.759

2014

32.574

2015

32.471

2016

34.838

2017

38.988

2018

40.275

2019

40.796

The number waiting for legal services as of the 1st July 2019 are set out on a law centre by law centre basis in the following table.

A small number of the Legal Aid Board’s law centres operate a ‘triage’ approach which involves giving an applicant a short consultation (45 minutes) for legal advice. Those persons remain on the Board’s waiting list for a second consultation if they require further legal services. The majority of centres do not currently operate the ‘triage’ approach.

Law Centre

Number waiting for first consultation

Number waiting for second consultation

Athlone

41

0

Blanchardstown

36

0

Castlebar

52

0

Cavan

41

0

Clondalkin

31

0

Cork Popes Quay

74

0

Cork South Mall

139

0

Dundalk

55

0

Ennis

14

21

Finglas

113

0

Galway Francis St

58

0

Galway Seville

22

11

Jervis Street

167

0

Kilkenny

57

0

Letterkenny

25

0

Limerick

25

0

Longford

33

0

Monaghan

32

0

Navan

49

0

Nenagh

72

0

Newbridge

24

0

Portlaoise

34

0

Sligo

55

0

Smithfield

75

0

Tallaght

59

0

Tralee

102

0

Tullamore

13

0

Waterford

66

0

Wexford

42

0

Wicklow

49

0

Garda Expenditure

Ceisteanna (932)

Brendan Smith

Ceist:

932. Deputy Brendan Smith asked the Minister for Justice and Equality if the necessary financial resources will be provided to An Garda Síochána to cover the costs associated with the recent visit of President Trump and not have funding originally allocated for Garda training reduced; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [33978/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Justice)

There has been very significant investment in Garda resources across the State in recent years. €1.76 billion has been allocated to the Garda Vote for 2019, in addition to capital investment amounting to €92 million this year.

I would remind the Deputy that the Garda Commissioner is the Accounting Officer for the Garda Vote. He is responsible for managing and controlling the administration and business of An Garda Síochána, including the allocation of Garda resources.

In relation to the matter raised by the Deputy, I am informed by the Garda authorities that the overall cost to An Garda Síochána of the visit to Ireland of President Trump has not yet been finalised.

I fully support the Commissioner in his performance of this role and in his efforts to ensure that the Garda Vote comes in on budget. Garda management and my Department keep the financial position of An Garda Síochána under ongoing review.

Garda Resources

Question No. 934 answered with Question No. 705.

Ceisteanna (933)

Louise O'Reilly

Ceist:

933. Deputy Louise O'Reilly asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the number of wholetime equivalent, WTE, vets working in the Garda dog unit and Garda mounted unit in each of the years 2016 to 2018 and to date 2019, in tabular form. [33994/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Justice)

As the Deputy will appreciate, it is the Garda Commissioner who has responsibility to manage and control generally the administration and business of the Garda Síochána, including by arranging for the recruitment, training and appointment of its members and civilian staff.

I am informed by the Garda Commissioner that An Garda Síochána does not directly employ vets but rather employs the services of a number of veterinary practices across the country as required.

Question No. 934 answered with Question No. 705.

Garda Strength

Question No. 936 answered with Question No. 915.

Questions Nos. 937 and 938 answered with Question No. 917.

Ceisteanna (935)

Fiona O'Loughlin

Ceist:

935. Deputy Fiona O'Loughlin asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the number of gardaí stationed in Portarlington Garda station; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [34007/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Justice)

For information on the Garda Workforce please see the following link.

www.justice.ie/en/JELR/Pages/Garda_Workforce.

The Garda strength from 2009 to 31 May 2019, as provided by the Commissioner, is available on my Department’s website through the following link.

www.justice.ie/en/JELR/002_Garda_Numbers_by_Division_District_and_Station_2009_to_31_May_2019_c.xlsx/Files/002_Garda_Numbers_by_Division_District_and_Station_2009_to_31_May_2019_c.xlsx.

 For more general information on Garda Facts and Figures please see the following link.

www.justice.ie/en/JELR/Pages/An_Garda_Siochana_facts_and_figures.

Question No. 936 answered with Question No. 915.
Questions Nos. 937 and 938 answered with Question No. 917.

Capital Expenditure Programme

Ceisteanna (939)

Marc MacSharry

Ceist:

939. Deputy Marc MacSharry asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the status of capital projects within the remit of his Department; the amount spent on each project to date; and the anticipated completion date. [34206/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Justice)

I wish to advise the Deputy that the new Forensic Science Laboratory in Co. Kildare is the only capital project under the remit of my Department's Vote and Agencies and work on this project is continuing.

The Office of Public Works (OPW) is managing the project on behalf of my Department.  The OPW advised that, due to the complexity of ISO standard (14644-1) for Cleanrooms and Associated Controlled Environments, it was necessary to add further material to the tender documentation for the main contract.  As a result the timelines for issuing the tender documentation had to be revised.  

Tender submissions for the main contract were received on 12th July and are currently being assessed.  The construction of the project is expected to take approximately two years to complete from the placing of the contract. 

The Forensic Science Laboratory project has incurred expenditure of €2.7m to date in relation to site clearance and preparation works. 

I have requested that relevant Agencies under the remit of my Department and operating under a separate Vote structure (Courts Service, Prison Service and An Garda Síochána) respond directly to the Deputy.

Garda Recruitment

Ceisteanna (940, 941, 942, 943, 944)

Catherine Connolly

Ceist:

940. Deputy Catherine Connolly asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the criteria applied in relation to the physical competency test aspect of the An Garda Síochána recruitment process, in particular with regard to age and gender; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [34211/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Catherine Connolly

Ceist:

941. Deputy Catherine Connolly asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the reason An Garda Síochána discriminate on the basis of age and or gender in relation to the physical competency test aspect of the recruitment process when other police services such as Police Scotland and London Metropolitan Police do not; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [34212/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Catherine Connolly

Ceist:

942. Deputy Catherine Connolly asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the number of persons that passed and failed the physical competency test aspect of An Garda Síochána recruitment in each of the years 2014 to 2018 and to date in 2019; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [34213/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Catherine Connolly

Ceist:

943. Deputy Catherine Connolly asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the findings of reviews undertaken in relation to the physical competency test aspect of the An Garda Síochána recruitment process; the way in which the physical competency test has changed as a result; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [34214/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Catherine Connolly

Ceist:

944. Deputy Catherine Connolly asked the Minister for Justice and Equality if pass and fail rates in relation to the physical competency test aspect of the An Garda Síochána recruitment process are reviewed in advance of the criteria being considered; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [34215/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Justice)

I propose to take Questions Nos. 940 to 944, inclusive, together.

As the Deputy will be aware, Section 26 of the Garda Síochána Act 2005 provides that it is the Commissioner who has the responsibility to direct and control An Garda Síochána and to carry on and manage and control generally the administration and business of An Garda Síochána, including by arranging for the recruitment of its members.

An Garda Síochána is governed by the Garda Síochána (Admissions and Appointments) Regulations 2013. The Public Appointments Service (PAS), on behalf of the Garda Commissioner, manages the initial recruitment stages for selection of Garda trainees. The final stages of the recruitment process in which candidates are vetted, and complete a physical competency test and a medical examination, are managed by the Garda Commissioner and as such, I, as Minister, have no direct role in the matter.

I have requested the relevant information from the Commissioner and I will write to the Deputy directly when I receive it.

Closed-Circuit Television Systems Provision

Ceisteanna (945)

John Curran

Ceist:

945. Deputy John Curran asked the Minister for Justice and Equality if the roll-out of the community based CCTV system in communities nationwide will be considered in view of the fact that not one community CCTV system is operational in the Dublin area; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [34226/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Justice)

CCTV systems installed for the purposes of crime prevention and as aids to policing in areas to which the general public routinely have access fall into two distinct but complementary categories, namely Garda CCTV systems and community-based CCTV systems. 

Community CCTV is governed by section 38(3)(c) of the Garda Síochána Act 2005 and the Garda Síochána (CCTV) Order 2006 (SI No 289 of 2006). This legal framework requires that any proposed community CCTV scheme must:

- be approved by the local Joint Policing Committee,

- have the prior support of the relevant local authority, which must also act as data controller, and

- have the authorisation of the Garda Commissioner.

This is the legal basis for all community CCTV schemes, regardless of how they are funded and these key legal requirements have not changed since 2006.  

It is of course the case that the possibility of establishing a Community CCTV scheme is available to groups that meet these legal requirements, anywhere in country, including the Dublin area.  I understand, indeed, that a number of Community CCTV schemes in the Dublin area were among those whose establishment was funded by Pobal under an earlier grant aid scheme which it administered on behalf of my Department.

In terms of current funding possibilities, I can confirm to the Deputy that my Department administers a grant aid scheme which can provide financial assistance to groups intending to establish a community-based CCTV system. There is no geographic limitation on this grant aid scheme.  Eligible groups, including community groups and local authorities nationwide, can apply for grant-aid of up to 60% of the total capital cost of a proposed CCTV system, up to a maximum total of €40,000.  Grant funding can be considered only for proposed CCTV schemes which have obtained the necessary statutory approvals, as set out above.

21 applications have been approved to date under the scheme, involving approval for grants totalling more than €500,000.  If the Deputy is aware of groups wishing to avail of the scheme, further details are available to download from my Department's website - www.justice.ie and support and guidance is available to help interested groups through a dedicated email address communitycctv@justice.ie.

Garda Transport Data

Ceisteanna (946)

John Curran

Ceist:

946. Deputy John Curran asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the number of additional marked and unmarked Garda cars and vehicles allocated to each Garda division to date in 2019; the number withdrawn during the same period; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [34233/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Justice)

The resources provided by Government to An Garda Síochána have reached unprecedented levels, with an allocation for 2019 of €1.76 billion. Very significant capital investment is also being made in An Garda Síochána, including a total of €46 million for investment in the Garda fleet between 2016 and 2021. This continuing investment is intended to ensure that An Garda Síochána can be mobile, visible and responsive on the roads and in the community to prevent and tackle crime.

The Deputy may also wish to be aware that a total of €10 million has been made available for the purchase and fit-out of Garda vehicles in 2019. I understand from the Garda authorities that this allocation will be used for purchase and fit-out of over 300 new vehicles for operational use this year.

As the Deputy will appreciate, in accordance with the Garda Síochána Act 2005 as amended, the Garda Commissioner is responsible for managing and controlling the administration and business of An Garda Síochána. Further, the allocation of Garda resources is a matter for the Commissioner, in light of identified operational demands. This includes responsibility for the allocation of Garda vehicles among the various Garda divisions. As Minister, I have no role in these matters. I am assured, however, that Garda management keeps the distribution of resources under continual review in the context of crime trends and policing priorities to ensure their optimum use.

I am informed by the Garda authorities that the following spreadsheet set out the number of vehicles allocated and withdrawn from the Garda fleet this year, up to 19 July 2019.

This table refers to vehicles allocated in 2019 to date. The Garda authorities indicate that allocations may include vehicles which were purchased in 2018, but in relation to which the technical fit-out process was not completed until 2019.

Garda vehicles allocated by Division during 2019 (as at 19 July 2019)

Division

Cars Total

Vans Total

4x4

*Others

Total

CAVAN-MONAGHAN

1

0

0

0

1

CORK CITY

3

0

0

2

5

CORK WEST

0

0

0

2

2

DMR EAST

4

0

0

0

4

DMR HARCOURT SQUARE

3

2

0

5

DMR NORTH

15

0

0

1

16

DMR NORTH CENTRAL

8

1

0

0

9

DMR SOUTH

6

0

0

0

6

DMR SOUTH CENTRAL

8

0

0

1

9

DMR TRAFFIC

0

0

0

2

2

DMR WEST

16

0

0

1

17

DONEGAL

1

0

0

0

1

GALWAY

2

0

0

2

4

KERRY

0

0

0

1

1

KILDARE

0

0

0

1

1

KILKENNY/CARLOW

1

0

0

2

3

LAOIS-OFFALY

0

0

0

1

1

LIMERICK

0

0

0

1

1

LOUTH

0

0

0

2

2

NATIONAL UNITS/ HEADQUARTERS

36

8

1

14

59

ROSCOMMON-LONGFORD

0

0

0

1

1

SLIGO-LEITRIM

0

1

0

0

1

WATERFORD

0

0

0

1

1

WESTMEATH

5

0

0

1

6

TOTAL

109

12

1

36

158

Garda vehicles removed from Fleet as at 19 July 2019

Division 

Cars

Vans

Bikes

4x4

*Others

Total

Cavan Monaghan

3

0

1

0

0

4

Clare 

3

0

0

0

0

3

Cork City

9

1

0

0

1

11

Cork North

4

0

0

1

0

5

Cork West

4

0

1

0

0

5

DMR East

2

0

0

0

0

2

DMR North

10

2

0

0

0

12

DMR North Central

8

0

0

0

0

8

DMR South

8

0

0

0

0

8

DMR South Central

6

1

0

0

0

7

DMR Traffic

0

1

1

0

0

2

DMR West

9

0

0

0

2

11

Donegal

6

0

0

0

0

6

Galway

4

0

0

1

1

6

Kerry

1

1

1

0

0

3

Kildare

4

0

0

0

0

4

Kilkenny- Carlow

6

0

0

0

0

6

Laois Offaly

4

0

1

0

0

5

Limerick

6

3

0

0

0

9

Louth

1

2

0

0

0

3

Mayo

4

1

0

0

0

5

Meath

3

0

0

0

0

3

National Units /HQ

40

3

5

1

0

49

Roscommon Longford

1

0

0

0

0

1

Sligo Leitrim

2

0

0

0

0

2

Tipperary

6

2

0

0

0

8

Waterford

2

2

0

0

0

4

Westmeath

0

0

0

1

0

1

Wexford

4

1

0

1

0

6

Wicklow

1

0

0

0

0

1

Total

161

20

10

5

4

200

*The category 'others' refers to MPV, SUV, Minibus or Prisoner Conveyance Vehicles

Garda Deployment

Ceisteanna (947)

John Curran

Ceist:

947. Deputy John Curran asked the Minister for Justice and Equality his views on the establishment of a dedicated public transport police section within An Garda Síochána; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [34237/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Justice)

As the Deputy is aware, the Garda Commissioner and his management team are responsible for the allocation of all Garda resources, including personnel, and I have no role in such matters.

I am advised by the Garda authorities that it is not proposed to establish a specialist or dedicated transport policing unit of An Garda Síochána and that effective local community policing can meet the policing needs of the public transport networks and its stakeholders.  

It is important to note that An Garda Síochána engages extensively with transport operators and that a range of regional and local operations have been put in place to address incidents and issues that have arisen at specific locations.  There is ongoing communication between An Garda Síochána and the respective control centres, and access to good quality CCTV can assist the Gardaí when investigating serious incidents. 

Furthermore, I welcome Irish Rail's plan to install more CCTV cameras and increase security patrols on DART carriages, which is a positive step.  I also welcome the introduction of a text alert system, which, I understand, Irish Rail will roll out shortly.  This service will facilitate customers to discreetly report any incidents as they develop on rail services.

The Deputy will be aware that An Garda Síochána already employ a range of operational measures aimed at tackling public-order offences and anti-social behaviour.  These measures are underpinned by the existence of a comprehensive legal framework, which assists the Gardaí in tackling this type of crime, including provisions under:

-  The Criminal Damage Act 1991;

-  Criminal Justice (Public Order) Act 1994;

-  The Criminal Justice (Public Order) Act 2003; and

-  The Intoxicating Liquor Acts 2003 and 2008.

For its part, the Government remains committed to ensuring that An Garda Síochána has all the necessary resources to tackle all forms of criminality in our communities.  A total budget of €1.76 billion has been provided to An Garda Síochána in 2019, an increase of over €100 million on the 2018 allocation.  The Commissioner has informed me that he plans to recruit a total of 600 trainee Gardaí in 2019 and, in addition, it is his intention to recruit a net 600 Garda Civilian Staff.  This Garda Staff recruitment will allow the Commissioner to redeploy a further 500 fully trained Gardaí from administrative duties to frontline policing in 2019.

The provision of these additional resources to the Commissioner is a key component in this Government's approach to improving public safety throughout the country, which will undoubtedly also benefit policing of transport services in Dublin and in other areas.

Personal Injury Claims

Ceisteanna (948)

Robert Troy

Ceist:

948. Deputy Robert Troy asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the number of prosecutions within the past five years of persons who have submitted false or misleading insurance claims, by personal injury claims and home insurance claims, in tabular form. [34247/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Justice)

I am sure the Deputy will be aware of the detailed discussion which took place at the Joint Committee on Finance, Public Expenditure and Reform, and Taoiseach on 9 July. Deputy Commissioner Twomey and Chief Superintendent Lordan, of the Garda National Economic Crime Bureau, had an open discussion with the Committee members in relation to insurance fraud investigation; including whether data was available on the level of prosecutions and convictions under the Civil Liability and Courts Act 2004. 

As noted by Deputy Commissioner Twomey, while there have been convictions for insurance fraud, the data is not easily collated; due to the complexity of these investigations, and the numerous offences that can arise ("insurance fraud" itself is not a defined offence). An Garda Síochána committed to providing further statistical data to the Committee at a future date. I too have asked for sight of this data, once compiled.

In relation to the 50 incidents of insurance fraud reported to An Garda Síochána from 1 November 2018 to 31 May 2019 (referred to in response to parliamentary question 325 of 11 July), An Garda Síochána noted that all were at different stages of investigation. Deputy Commissioner Twomey noted that decisions with regard to prosecution are awaited on some of the 50, while others are still in the early stages of investigation.

Garda Data

Ceisteanna (949)

Mary Butler

Ceist:

949. Deputy Mary Butler asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the number of Garda Síochána stations; the number of gardaí in each station in County Waterford at 31 March 2011 and 31 March 2019; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [34350/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Justice)

As the Deputy will be aware, there has been an unprecedented level of investment in An Garda Síochána in recent years, in support of the Government’s commitment to ensuring a strong and visible police presence throughout the country in order to maintain and strengthen community engagement, provide reassurance to citizens and deter crime. €1.76 billion has been allocated to the Garda Vote for 2019, as well as capital investment amounting to €92 million this year.

The Deputy will appreciate that the Garda Commissioner is primarily responsible for the effective and efficient use of the resources available to An Garda Síochána, including responsibility for the formulation of proposals in relation to the opening of Garda stations and the allocation of personnel. As Minister, I have no direct role in such matters. I am informed however that Garda management keeps the distribution of resources under continual review in the context of crime trends and policing priorities so as to ensure that the optimum use is made of these resources.

I am informed by the Garda authorities that there are 565 Garda stations in the State.

The Garda strength of the Waterford Division from 2009 to 31 May 2019, as provided by the Commissioner, is available on my Department’s website through the following link: www.justice.ie/en/JELR/002_Garda_Numbers_by_Division_District_and_Station_2009_to_31_May_2019_c.xlsx/Files/002_Garda_Numbers_by_Division_District_and_Station_2009_to_31_May_2019_c.xlsx

Garda Deployment

Ceisteanna (950)

Mary Butler

Ceist:

950. Deputy Mary Butler asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the number of new recruits who have been allocated to Garda stations in County Waterford in each of the years 2015 to 2018 and to date in 2019; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [34352/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Justice)

For information on the Garda Workforce please see the following link.

www.justice.ie/en/JELR/Pages/Garda_Workforce.

 The allocation of Probationer Gardaí by Division from 2014 to present is outlined in the following link.

www.justice.ie/en/JELR/Pages/Probationer_Gardaí.  

 For more general information on Garda Facts and Figures please see the following link.

www.justice.ie/en/JELR/Pages/An_Garda_Siochana_facts_and_figures.

Brexit Preparations

Ceisteanna (951)

Lisa Chambers

Ceist:

951. Deputy Lisa Chambers asked the Minister for Justice and Equality if there is primary or secondary legislation that needs to be passed ahead of the Brexit deadline of 31 October 2019; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [34467/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Justice)

The Withdrawal of the United Kingdom from the European Union (Consequential Provisions) Act 2019 – the ‘Brexit Omnibus Act’, signed into law by the President on 17 March, focuses on protecting Irish citizens, assisting businesses and jobs, and securing ongoing access to essential services and products.  It consists of fifteen Parts relating to matters within the remits of nine Ministers.  The Parts of this legislation are ready to be commenced as needed. 

Part 13 and 14 of the Act relates to areas under the remit of my Department.  Part 13 deals with Extradition and will ensure that workable arrangements are in place to extradite individuals, including own nationals, to the UK once they become a third country.

 Part 14 of the Act confirms that immigration officers have the power to undertake a refoulement consideration and provides a legal basis for taking fingerprints of Irish visa and Irish transit visa applicants, to enable the continuance of the British Irish Visa Scheme, pursuant to Common Travel Area arrangements.  Part 14 was commenced earlier this month.

In addition, following the recent divorce referendum, I published the Family Law Bill 2019. The Bill will include provisions to ensure, in the event of a no-deal Brexit, that the recognition in Ireland of divorces granted in the UK after EU legislation in this area came into operation on 1 March 2001, will continue to be on the basis of habitual residence, rather than the domicile requirement provided for in the Domicile and Recognition of Foreign Divorces Act 1986 which applies to divorces granted in non-EU states.

New secondary legislation is being drafted to deal with a number of issues, including designating the UK as a safe third country for immigration purposes; recognition of solicitor qualifications; regulations to enable UK citizens to join the Gardaí and the Garda reserves.  Furthermore, work is ongoing  on the preparation of a regulation to facilitate implementation of the Hague Maintenance Convention.