Closed-Circuit Television Systems

Question No. 221 answered with Question No. 212.

Ceisteanna (219, 220)

Niamh Smyth

Ceist:

219. Deputy Niamh Smyth asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the contact details within his Department for local groups to liaise with in relation to the CCTV scheme and their respective applications; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [38558/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Niamh Smyth

Ceist:

220. Deputy Niamh Smyth asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the number of CCTV schemes approved for funding since the scheme commenced; the number of schemes approved in 2019; if all local authorities are signed up to the scheme; the areas that have been successful with their applications, in tabular form; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [38560/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Justice)

I propose to take Questions Nos. 219 and 220 together.

As the Deputy may be aware, Community CCTV is governed by section 38(3)(c) of the Garda Síochána Act 2005 and the Garda Síochána (CCTV) Order 2006 (SI No 289 of 2006). This legal framework requires that any proposed community CCTV scheme must:

- be approved by the local Joint Policing Committee,

- have the prior support of the relevant local authority, which must also act as data controller, and

- have the authorisation of the Garda Commissioner.

This is the legal basis for all community CCTV schemes, regardless of how they are funded and these key legal requirements have not changed since 2006. The possibility of establishing a Community CCTV scheme is available to groups that meet these legal requirements, anywhere in the country.

Since 2017, my Department has administered a grant aid scheme supporting groups wishing to establish a community-based CCTV system in their area. To date, 21 applications have been approved under the scheme, involving approved grants totalling more than €540,000. The location of these approved funding applications, as requested by the Deputy, are as follows:

- Carrick on Shannon, Co Leitrim

- Cranmore, Co Sligo

- Arklow, Co Wicklow

- Courttown/Riverchapel, Gorey and Wexford Town, Co Wexford

- Abbeyfeale, Adare, Askeaton, Caherconlish, Cappamore, Castleconnell, Croom, Foynes, Kilmallock, Newcastlewest, Pallasgreen, Patrickswell, Murroe and Rathkeale, County Limerick.

- Monaghan Town, Co. Monaghan

I can confirm that the grant aid scheme remains open for applications from interested groups in 2019 and that all fully completed applications received before the end of 2019 will be considered.

Eligible groups, including community groups and local authorities nationwide, can apply for grant-aid of up to 60% of the total capital cost of a proposed CCTV system, up to a maximum total of €40,000.

I am pleased to inform the Deputy that I have recently expanded the grant aid scheme to cover not only new CCTV systems but also to allow funding applications for extension or upgrade of existing Community CCTV systems which are incomplete or obsolete. Applicants can now also seek a grant of up to €5,000 for minor maintenance costs.

I must emphasise that grant funding can be considered only for CCTV systems which meet the legal requirements for CCTV, in other words CCTV systems which have been approved by the relevant Joint Policing Committee, the relevant Local Authority (also acting as Data Controller) and which have received the authorisation of the Garda Commissioner.

If the Deputy is aware of groups wishing to avail of the scheme, further details are available to download from my Department's website - www.justice.ie and support and guidance is available to help interested groups through a dedicated email address communitycctv@justice.ie

Question No. 221 answered with Question No. 212.

Direct Provision System

Ceisteanna (222)

Catherine Murphy

Ceist:

222. Deputy Catherine Murphy asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the number of new direct provision centres planned for 2019 and 2020; the way in which the proposed new centres are selected and or the criteria for same; the way in which the centres will be staffed; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [38586/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Justice)

As the Deputy will be aware, while a claim for International Protection is being examined, the State is legally obliged to offer accommodation and related services to anyone without means - which includes all meals, medical care and utilities. A weekly personal allowance is paid to each person in a centre and exceptional needs are covered by the Department of Employment Affairs and Social Protection.

My Department requires additional accommodation centres as the number of people arriving to seek our protection continues to rise (figures are up 36% in the first half of this year). There are also now more than 1,300 people placed in emergency accommodation in hotels and guesthouses. This is a highly unsatisfactory situation and can only be regarded as a short-term solution. The procurement of new accommodation centres has been approached in two ways.

Firstly, the Department has advertised in the national media for expressions of interest from property owners for a short-term contract (usually one year) to meet demand while the regional tender process is rolled out nationally. Centres in Kenmare, Lisdoonvarna, Mallow, Moate and Wicklow were opened in 2018 through this process. Further centres may also be opened through this process.

Secondly, my Department is running procurement competitions on a regional basis throughout the country to procure accommodation through the government’s procurement portal, Etenders. These contracts will be longer term than the expressions of interest with a minimum contract duration of 2 years on offer and a maximum contract duration of 4 years.

Accommodation providers can offer premises both through the expressions of interest process or the tender process.

The following regional competitions have progressed through the evaluation stage and are in the mobilisation phase; the South East, Midlands and the MidWest Regions. Evaluation is underway for the South West and Western Regions. The closing date for bids for the Mid East Region was the 16 September and evaluation will commence shortly. Advertisements for bids for the Dublin Region was published on 18 September and advertisements for the Borders Region are scheduled to be published by the end of this month.

The Deputy will be aware, that until the procurement process, which is commercially sensitive, is complete, it is not possible to confirm any specific locations or premises.

Tenders received are evaluated on the most economically advantageous tender method which assesses bids on the quality of service as well as price. The level, expertise and qualifications of staff are assessed as part of this process.

I recently published agreed National Standards for accommodation centres. The Standards will apply to all service providers contracted by the Department to operate and manage accommodation and reception centres. They provide a framework for the continued development of supports and services for residents by improving the quality of care and ensuring consistency across the centres. A copy of the Standards can be found on my Department's website www.justice.ie.

Direct Provision System

Ceisteanna (223)

Catherine Murphy

Ceist:

223. Deputy Catherine Murphy asked the Minister for Justice and Equality if he has consulted with the Minister for Housing, Planning and Local Government regarding accommodation needs of persons that cannot be facilitated in direct provision centres due to lack of accommodation; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [38587/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Justice)

As the Deputy will appreciate, my Department is experiencing significant upward pressure on its accommodation portfolio due to an increase in the number of people claiming international protection and an associated demand for accommodation and related services. In the first half of this year alone, we have seen a 36% increase in the number of applications received.

Our 38 existing accommodation centres are currently at full capacity. To ensure that we can continue to provide accommodation for all applicants who require it, since September 2018, my Department has arranged for the provision of emergency accommodation in hotels and guest houses. Every effort is being made to re-accommodate residents in these emergency locations to a dedicated accommodation centre as quickly as possible. My Department is actively working on securing additional capacity, both in existing centres and through sourcing new centres via a series of regional procurement competitions and an expression of interest process that was advertised in the national media.

Currently, we are accommodating 6,056 people across our 38 accommodation centres and a further 1,363 people in 34 emergency accommodation locations.

Officials of my Department regularly engage with other Government Departments and Public Sector organisations to ensure that everyone in the protection process can access the necessary public services and supports. Regular meetings take place with representatives from the Department of Housing, Planning and Local Government, the Department of Employment Affairs and Social Protection, the Department Education and Skills, and with representatives from the Health Services Executive and the Education and Welfare Service.

My Department is represented on the Homeless Interagency Group and the Dublin Joint Homelessness Consultative Forum. My officials also engage on a regular basis with representatives of the Dublin Regional Homeless Executive.

Residents who have been granted an international protection status or a permission to remain have the same access to housing supports and services as Irish and European Economic Area (EEA) nationals. There are currently approximately 900 residents with status or permission to remain. My Department is supporting these residents to move out of our accommodation centres and into secure permanent accommodation. We are providing funding support to DePaul Ireland and the Peter McVerry Trust to work with these residents to secure homes. A number of NGOs have also been awarded monies under the EU Asylum, Migration and Integration Fund (AMIF). These include the PATHS project and South Dublin County Partnership. Additionally, my Department is liaising with officials in the Department of Housing, Planning and Local Government, and with the City and County Managers Association (CCMA) collectively to support residents with status or permission to remain to access housing options.

International Protection

Ceisteanna (224)

Catherine Murphy

Ceist:

224. Deputy Catherine Murphy asked the Minister for Justice and Equality if each aspect of service and accommodation aspects are put out to tender of if a preferred supplier list is used; the number of companies on the preferred supplier list in respect of services and goods related to direct provision; the frequency with which the lists are reviewed and or updated; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [38588/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Justice)

I can confirm to the Deputy that my Department does not use a preferred supplier list in procuring accommodation centres for people seeking international protection.

My Department is currently engaged in a number of regional procurement processes. A Request for Tender (RFT) is issued through the Government’s procurement portal E-tenders for the provision of accommodation centres, including the provision of catering, housekeeping, general maintenance and security services.

It is open to any person, company or indeed non-governmental agency to enter a bid into the process. Each RFT to date has sought to establish a Multi-Supplier Framework for a specific region within the State. As the Deputy may be aware, a framework agreement is an agreement between one or more economic operators, the purpose of which is to establish the terms governing contracts to be awarded during a given period, in particular with regard to price and, where appropriate, the quantity envisaged.

All tenderers who are successful and admitted to a framework agreement by my Department have offered suitable premises to house people seeking international protection and must, as part of the agreement, provide all aspects of the management and provision of catering, housekeeping, general maintenance and security services in their proposed accommodation centres. Each Framework Agreement is for a specific period, which is outlined in each RFT.

Immigration Status

Ceisteanna (225)

Donnchadh Ó Laoghaire

Ceist:

225. Deputy Donnchadh Ó Laoghaire asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the immigration status of the persons who were adversely affected by the recent student recruitment agency closure; the measures to be put in place to ensure that international students are protected against another closure of this nature; the status of the investigation into the circumstances surrounding the closure of the agency which was carried out by the Garda National Immigration Bureau; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [38746/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Justice)

The Immigration Service of my Department is aware of the situation referred to by the Deputy and contacts between the Burgh Quay Registration Office and the Irish Council for International Students took place before the summer break in this regard.

Arrangements were put in place to facilitate any continuing language students who had paid their second year fees to the company rather than directly to a college. Some of these courses were due to start last July; however, students were allowed to defer their college entry to end September, to allow them to make new arrangements. Students with proof from a college that they had been accepted onto a course to start by the end of September were granted a temporary Stamp 2 permission.

The International Organisation for Migration (IOM) have also advised that they will consider the voluntary return of any students rendered destitute because they have lost money as a result of the closure. If a student decides to avail of the IOM option this will not impact negatively on any further stay in Ireland, whether to visit or to reside.

As the Deputy will appreciate, the issue of any investigation is a matter for An Garda Síochána and it would therefore not be appropriate for me to comment further at this time.

Deportation Orders

Ceisteanna (226)

Niamh Smyth

Ceist:

226. Deputy Niamh Smyth asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the reason for the delay for a person (details supplied) in receiving a family permanent visa; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [38752/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Justice)

I am informed by the Immigration Service of my Department that the person referred to by the Deputy is the subject of a Deportation Order signed on 7 September 2018.

Representations were received on behalf of the person, pursuant to Section 3(11) of the Immigration Act 199 (as amended), seeking to revoke the Deportation Order. This request will be considered as soon as possible.

The decision from the consideration of this request will be to have the existing Deportation Order 'affirmed' or 'revoked'. Once such a decision has been made, this decision will be notified to the applicant in writing. In the meantime, the Deportation Order remains valid and in place.

Queries in relation to the status of individual immigration cases may be made directly to the Immigration Service of my Department by e-mail using the Oireachtas Mail facility which has been specifically established for this purpose. This service enables up to date information on such cases to be obtained without the need to seek information by way of Parliamentary Questions process. The Deputy may wish to consider using the e-mail service except in cases where the response from the Immigration Service is, in the Deputy's view, inadequate or too long awaited.

Garda Data

Ceisteanna (227)

Thomas P. Broughan

Ceist:

227. Deputy Thomas P. Broughan asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the number of gardaí by rank attached to the Garda stolen vehicle investigation unit; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [38774/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Justice)

The Garda Commissioner has responsibility for managing An Garda Síochána and for the allocation of Garda resources, in light of identified operational demands. This includes responsibility for personnel matters. As Minister I have no direct role in these matters. I understand however that Garda management keeps the distribution of resources under continual review in the context of crime trends and policing priorities, to ensure their optimum use.

I am advised by the Commissioner that the Stolen Motor Vehicle Investigation Unit forms part of the Garda National Bureau of Criminal Investigation and falls under the remit of Assistant Commissioner, Special Crime Operations (SCO).

I am further informed that the unit has a total of 10 officers including both Garda Staff and Garda members as follows: 1 Detective Superintendent, 1 Detective Sergeant, 7 Detective Gardaí and 1 member of Garda civilian staff.

Judicial Council

Ceisteanna (228)

John Curran

Ceist:

228. Deputy John Curran asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the steps he is taking to accelerate the process of establishing the judicial council in order to protect voluntary and community groups from rising insurance costs and subsequent closure; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [38780/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Justice)

In conjunction with the Courts Service, my Department is actively engaged in assisting with the establishment of the independent Judicial Council by the end of this year. This includes considering the practical arrangements for staffing and accommodation, which will need to be put in place before the Judicial Council is established.

The relevant Orders to commence the Judicial Council Act 2019 are expected to be made later this year.

The issue of awards in personal injury claims is being dealt with within the framework of the Judicial Council Act 2019. This landmark Act provides for the establishment of a number of committees including a personal injuries guidelines committee, which will be assigned the function of compiling guidelines for appropriate general damages for various types of personal injuries.

The measures included in the Judicial Council Act constitute an element of a wide range of actions undertaken by Government to mitigate the costs insurance companies impose on consumers.

Garda Expenditure

Ceisteanna (229)

Jim O'Callaghan

Ceist:

229. Deputy Jim O'Callaghan asked the Minister for Justice and Equality the breakdown of costs associated per year in regard to implementing the report A Policing Service for the Future; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [38822/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Justice)

Unprecedented resources are currently being provided to An Garda Síochána by the Government. A total budget of €1.76 billion has been allocated to An Garda Síochána in 2019, in addition to capital investment of €92 million this year. This represents a 50% increase in capital funding to An Garda Síochána compared to 2018.

This investment is supporting an ambitious ongoing process of Garda reform, arising from the report of the Commission on the Future of Policing and A Policing Service for the Future, the 4-year implementation plan for that report published last December.

Implementation of the plan is being overseen by a dedicated Policing Reform Implementation Programme Office located in the Department of the Taoiseach, as recommended by the Commission. An Implementation Group on Policing Reform (IGPR) with collective responsibility for delivery of the implementation plan has been established with Helen Ryan, former member of the Commission, as its independent chair.

A Policing Service for the Future is a living document and throughout the implementation process, the Programme Office will be reviewing and updating the plan as required, in consultation with all relevant stakeholders, to maintain ambitious but realistic commitments, time-frames and milestones in delivery of the reform project. Further information is available on the Policing Reform Portal at the following link https://www.gov.ie/en/campaigns/065724-policing-reform/

As the Deputy will appreciate, much of the cost of the implementation of this reform process arises against the regular votes of the Departments, organisations and agencies involved. The vast majority of the costs are in the Garda Síochána Vote, including in relation to staffing, training and ICT. As such, the full costs are not disaggregated and it is not possible to give a full breakdown at this time.

Living Wage

Ceisteanna (230)

Maurice Quinlivan

Ceist:

230. Deputy Maurice Quinlivan asked the Minister for Business, Enterprise and Innovation the number of workers employed by her Department and in each office or agency under the aegis of her Department that earn less than the living wage of €12.30 per hour; and if she will make a statement on the matter. [38245/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Business)

Remuneration of all the staff of the Department, its Offices and its Agencies is as sanctioned by the Department of Public Expenditure and Reform for various individual grades in line with Government policy.

In relation to the Department and its Offices, there are currently 5 staff earning an hourly rate less than the living wage, (based on a 37-hour net working week). This figure reflects recent recruitment of staff at the starting point on the relevant incremental scale for their grades, namely Services Officer and Services Attendant. However, as the maximum point on the incremental scales for these grades is above the hourly rate of €12.30, over time, and based on satisfactory performance, each staff member in these grades would proceed to earn more than the figure of €12.30 per hour.

With regard to the Agencies under the aegis of my Department the position in relation to each is as follows:

Agency

Position (based on a 37-hour week net)

Enterprise Ireland

19 employees currently earning a rate equivalent or less than €12.30 per hour.

IAASA*

1 employee currently earning a rate less than €12.30 per hour.

IDA Ireland

9 employees currently earning a rate less than €12.30 per hour.

NSAI

4 employees currently earning a rate less than €12.30 per hour.

CCPC

There are no employees currently earning less than €12.30 per hour.

PIAB

There are no employees currently earning less than €12.30 per hour.

Science Foundation Ireland

There are no employees currently earning less than €12.30 per hour.

Health & Safety Authority

There are no employees currently earning less than €12.30 per hour.

* Based on a 39-hour working week net

Trade Missions

Ceisteanna (231)

Bobby Aylward

Ceist:

231. Deputy Bobby Aylward asked the Minister for Business, Enterprise and Innovation her plans to travel on a trade mission to Spain; and if she will make a statement on the matter. [38387/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Business)

Enterprise Ireland offers a programme of trade missions and events which support the goal of securing high-level market access for companies based in Ireland who are aiming to grow business overseas and increase domestic employment.

In accordance with the 2019 trade mission programme, my colleague, Mr Pat Breen, T.D., Minister of State for Trade, Employment, Business, EU Digital Single Market and Data Protection, will lead a trade mission to Madrid on 2 and 3 October 2019. Twenty Irish companies will accompany the Minister on the mission. Minister Breen will also hold meetings with his Spanish counterpart to discuss trade related issues during the mission.

Fire Safety

Ceisteanna (232)

Seán Sherlock

Ceist:

232. Deputy Sean Sherlock asked the Minister for Business, Enterprise and Innovation if her attention has been drawn to the recently revealed high level of fire safety toxins in homes (details supplied). [38436/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Business)

In the area of furniture fire safety, there are no harmonised EU standards. The Irish standards and regulations were introduced to protect consumers by preventing the rapid spread of a fire started on or near furniture. These standards are in line with those introduced in the UK, which is particularly relevant given the cross-border trade in furniture on the island of Ireland and the presence of furniture manufacturers along the border area.

The UK has undertaken two consultations (in 2014 and 2016) on the suitability of the UK regulations but has yet to amend its regulations. In view of the similarity of the regulations in both jurisdictions, my Department has liaised very closely with the relevant department in the UK and continues to monitor the situation to keep abreast of developments in that jurisdiction. My Department also liaises, both formally and informally, with other stakeholders in Ireland on the issue.

Having similar regulations in place on both sides of the border gives consumers clarity and certainty that uniform safety standards apply, while manufacturers have certainty that their products can be sold in both jurisdictions without going to the added expense of manufacturing furniture according to different standards and legislation. Any change in existing regulations, or replacement thereof, will have to provide a robust level of safety when it comes to furniture catching fire.

My Department is conscious of the need to ensure that if replacement regulations are to be introduced, they must be effective and evidence-based, bearing in mind the tension between short term effects (in relation to flame retardant chemicals providing time to escape a fire and the impact on fire crews’ operations) and possible long-term health considerations. There is also a need to ensure that if the Regulations are to change there will be no reduction in safety for the consumers of Ireland.

My Department will be issuing a public consultation document on the Irish regulations in the near future. The public consultation will assist the Department in revisiting the current regulations while maintaining a high level of safety with regard to flammability of furniture in Irish homes.

Trade Union Membership

Ceisteanna (233)

Michael Moynihan

Ceist:

233. Deputy Michael Moynihan asked the Minister for Business, Enterprise and Innovation the number of members of trade unions that notified her Department of being in benefit on 31 December 2018 (details supplied); and if she will make a statement on the matter. [38519/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Business)

Section 20(1) of the Industrial Relations Act, 1990 provides that within one month after 31st December each year a trade union which is the holder of a negotiation licence shall send to the Minister a statement of the number of its members on the 31st December. Details of the trade unions membership numbers as at 31st December 2018 are in the following table.

Union

Membership at 31st December 2018

Association of Higher Civil and Public Servants (AHCPS)

3,200

Association of Secondary Teachers of Ireland (ASTI)

16,849

Forsa

(The Civil Public and Services Union (CPSU), Public Service Executive Union (PSEU) and the Irish Municipal, Public and Civil Trade Union (IMPACT) merged on 1 January 2018 to form Forsa).

79,570

Irish Federation of University Teachers (IFUT)

2,469

Irish Medical Organisation (IMO)

5,601

Irish Nurses and Midwifes’ Organisation (INMO)

42,232

Irish National Teachers Organisation (INTO)

38,545

Medical Laboratories Staff Association (MLSA)

1,565

Prison Officers Association (POA)

3,024

Operative Plasterers and Allied Trades Society of Ireland (OPATSI)

916

Services, Industrial, Professional and Technical Union (SIPTU).

202,787

Connect

The Technical Engineering and Electrical Union (TEEU) merged with UCATT on 1 January 2017 to form Connect.

39,000

Teachers’ Union of Ireland (TUI)

18,352

UNITE

21,440

Veterinary Officers’ Association (VOA)

266

Veterinary Ireland (VI)

1,134

Work Permits Applications

Ceisteanna (234)

Colm Brophy

Ceist:

234. Deputy Colm Brophy asked the Minister for Business, Enterprise and Innovation the reason An Bord Altranais issues a recognition of both a diploma and degree certificate for non-national nurses to be eligible to work here but her Department will not issue a critical skills visa to non-degree holding nurses to enable them to work here; and if she will make a statement on the matter. [38753/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Business)

The critical skills employment permit is designed to attract highly skilled people into the labour market. Eligible occupations, on the critical skills occupation list, under this type of permit are deemed to be critically important to growing Ireland's economy, are highly demanded and highly skilled and in significant shortage of supply in our labour market. For this employment type non-EEA nationals must be the holder of a degree level qualification or higher in the relevant field if the remuneration on offer is between €30,000 and €60,000 per annum. In cases where the remuneration is €60,000 or more the non-EEA national can be either the holder of a degree level qualification or higher in the relevant field or have the necessary experience for the role.

Qualified non-EEA nurses who wish to work in Ireland are eligible for critical skills employment permits where they have been awarded a relevant degree or degree equivalent and the proposed employment meets the criteria for this type of employment permit. Where a non-EEA nurse is qualified to practice nursing in Ireland but does not hold a relevant degree, they may be eligible for a General Employment Permit in order to work here.

The determination of qualification equivalence is made by NARIQ Ireland; information is available at http://www.qqi.ie/Articles/Pages/Qualifications-Recognition.aspx

Non-EEA nurses who wish to work in Ireland must normally complete an adaptation process in order to register with The Nursing and Midwifery Board of Ireland. Permission to be in the State to undertake this process is granted by the Department of Justice and Equality.

Medicinal Products Reimbursement

Ceisteanna (235)

Thomas Pringle

Ceist:

235. Deputy Thomas Pringle asked the Minister for Health the weighting percentages to be used as part of the upcoming HSE FreeStyle Libre group review decision making process that will be given to criteria (details supplied); and if he will make a statement on the matter. [38928/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Health)

Under the Health (Pricing and Supply of Medical Goods) Act 2013, the HSE has statutory responsibility for the administration of the community drug schemes; therefore, the matter has been referred to the HSE for attention and direct reply to the Deputy.

Medicinal Products Reimbursement

Ceisteanna (236)

Thomas Pringle

Ceist:

236. Deputy Thomas Pringle asked the Minister for Health if the reimbursement dataset will specifically cover only current HSE funded users of the FreeStyle Libre device; if not, if the Health Technology Assessment Group review will simply compare total blood glucose strip usage spend year on year; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [38929/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Health)

Under the Health (Pricing and Supply of Medical Goods) Act 2013, the HSE has statutory responsibility for the administration of the community drug schemes; therefore, the matter has been referred to the HSE for attention and direct reply to the Deputy.

Medicinal Products Reimbursement

Ceisteanna (237)

Carol Nolan

Ceist:

237. Deputy Carol Nolan asked the Minister for Health the weighting percentages to be used as part of the upcoming HSE FreeStyle Libre review decision making process that will be given to criteria (details supplied); and if he will make a statement on the matter. [38950/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Health)

Under the Health (Pricing and Supply of Medical Goods) Act 2013, the HSE has statutory responsibility for the administration of the community drug schemes; therefore, the matter has been referred to the HSE for attention and direct reply to the Deputy.

Medicinal Products Reimbursement

Ceisteanna (238)

Carol Nolan

Ceist:

238. Deputy Carol Nolan asked the Minister for Health if the reimbursement dataset will specifically cover only current HSE funded users of FreeStyle Libre device; if not, if the Health Technology Assessment Group review will compare total blood glucose strip usage spend year on year; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [38951/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Health)

Under the Health (Pricing and Supply of Medical Goods) Act 2013, the HSE has statutory responsibility for the administration of the community drug schemes; therefore, the matter has been referred to the HSE for attention and direct reply to the Deputy.