Long-Term Illness Scheme Coverage

Ceisteanna (130)

Niamh Smyth

Ceist:

130. Deputy Niamh Smyth asked the Minister for Health further to Parliamentary Question No. 383 of 13 February 2018, his plans to include the purchase of EpiPens under the long-term illness scheme; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [49180/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Health)

The Long Term Illness Scheme was established under Section 59(3) of the Health Act 1970 (as amended). The conditions covered by the LTI are: acute leukaemia; mental handicap; cerebral palsy; mental illness (in a person under 16); cystic fibrosis; multiple sclerosis; diabetes insipidus; muscular dystrophies; diabetes mellitus; parkinsonism; epilepsy; phenylketonuria; haemophilia; spina bifida; hydrocephalus; and conditions arising from the use of Thalidomide.

Under the LTI Scheme, patients receive drugs, medicines, and medical and surgical appliances directly related to the treatment of their illness, free of charge.

There are no plans to include adrenaline auto-injectors under the LTI Scheme as they are not indicated for the treatment of one of the above conditions. 

I wish to advise the Deputy that there are no plans to extend the list of conditions covered by the LTI Scheme at this time. However, I wish to inform the Deputy that it is proposed that the LTI Scheme would be included as part of a review of the basis for existing hospital and medication charges, to be carried out under commitments given in the Sláintecare Implementation Strategy.

Home Help Service

Ceisteanna (131)

Brian Stanley

Ceist:

131. Deputy Brian Stanley asked the Minister for Health if home help cover for holidays is available in each county; and if not, the counties in which it is not available. [49181/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Health)

As this is a service matter I have asked the Health Service Executive to respond directly to the Deputy as soon as possible.

Hospital Services

Ceisteanna (132)

Brian Stanley

Ceist:

132. Deputy Brian Stanley asked the Minister for Health the commencement date for the consultation process for Portlaoise Hospital; and the timeframe for completion. [49182/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Health)

As I have outlined previously, no decision has been made yet on the draft Action Plan for Portlaoise Hospital. I committed to ensuring that local clinicians and the community would be consulted with before a decision is made. The appointment of an independent external facilitator for the consultation process is being progressed.  The outcome of the consultation process will be a submission from my Department, setting out the key findings from the consultation process and recommended response to inform me in making a final decision on the draft Action Plan. 

Hospital Waiting Lists

Ceisteanna (133)

Michael Healy-Rae

Ceist:

133. Deputy Michael Healy-Rae asked the Minister for Health the status of a hospital appointment for a person (details supplied); and if he will make a statement on the matter. [49184/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Health)

Under the Health Act 2004, the Health Service Executive (HSE) is required to manage and deliver, or arrange to be delivered on its behalf, health and personal social services. Section 6 of the HSE Governance Act 2013 bars the Minister for Health from directing the HSE to provide a treatment or a personal service to any individual or to confer eligibility on any individual.

The National Waiting List Management Policy, a standardised approach to managing scheduled care treatment for in-patient, day case and planned procedures, since January 2014, has been developed to ensure that all administrative, managerial and clinical staff follow an agreed national minimum standard for the management and administration of waiting lists for scheduled care. This policy, which has been adopted by the HSE, sets out the processes that hospitals are to implement to manage waiting lists. 

In relation to the particular query raised, as this is a service matter, I have asked the HSE to respond to the Deputy directly.

Pharmacy Services

Ceisteanna (134, 165)

Jim O'Callaghan

Ceist:

134. Deputy Jim O'Callaghan asked the Minister for Health the reason for the significant cuts to pharmacy funding proposed from 1 January 2020; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [49185/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Brendan Smith

Ceist:

165. Deputy Brendan Smith asked the Minister for Health if consideration will be given to the concerns of pharmacists as outlined in correspondence (details supplied); and if he will make a statement on the matter. [49333/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Health)

I propose to take Questions Nos. 134 and 165 together.

As the Minster for Health I recognise the significant role community pharmacists play in the delivery of patient care and the potential for this role to be developed further in the context of health service reform and modernisation. Community pharmacy is recognised as the most accessible element of our health service with an unequalled reach in terms of patient contact and access, regardless of their geographic location or status as either an independent retailer or as part of a larger chain of providers.

The regulations governing the current pharmacy fee structure were made under section 9 of the FEMPI Act 2009 and are set to expire at the end of 2019. Under the Public Service Pay and Pensions Act 2017, these regulations must be replaced on 1 January 2020 to maintain a statutory basis for contractor payments and to prescribe the fees payable from that date. The fees to be set are determined by the Minister for Health, with the consent of the Minister for Public Expenditure and Reform.

In keeping with my obligations under Section 43 of the 2017 Act, Department of Health officials have begun a process of consultation with the IPU, as the representative body, prior to the introduction of new fee regulations. My officials have met with an IPU delegation on two occasions and a detailed submission was received from the IPU on 8 November.

That submission is currently being considered by my Department in the context of the statutory fee-setting process as referred to.

In May of this year I addressed the Irish Pharmaceutical Union at the National Pharmacy Conference and gave a commitment to move beyond the arrangements underpinned by the Financial Emergency Measures in the Public Interest Act 2009 (FEMPI) with a view to optimising the role of pharmacists in the years ahead. It is my intention to open contract discussions in 2020 which will assist to deliver on the commitment given.

Hospital Waiting Lists

Ceisteanna (135)

Mary Butler

Ceist:

135. Deputy Mary Butler asked the Minister for Health when a person (details supplied) will be called for an operation at St. James's Hospital; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [49192/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Health)

Under the Health Act 2004, the Health Service Executive (HSE) is required to manage and deliver, or arrange to be delivered on its behalf, health and personal social services. Section 6 of the HSE Governance Act 2013 bars the Minister for Health from directing the HSE to provide a treatment or a personal service to any individual or to confer eligibility on any individual. 

The National Waiting List Management Policy, a standardised approach to managing scheduled care treatment for in-patient, day case and planned procedures, since January 2014, has been developed to ensure that all administrative, managerial and clinical staff follow an agreed national minimum standard for the management and administration of waiting lists for scheduled care. This policy, which has been adopted by the HSE, sets out the processes that hospitals are to implement to manage waiting lists. 

In relation to the particular query raised, as this is a service matter, I have asked the HSE to respond to the Deputy directly.

Occupational Therapy Waiting Lists

Ceisteanna (136)

Ruth Coppinger

Ceist:

136. Deputy Ruth Coppinger asked the Minister for Health if extra resources will be allocated to reduce the 12-month waiting time for assessment by an occupational therapist; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [49232/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Health)

As this question relates to service matters, I have arranged for the question to be referred to the Health Service Executive (HSE) for direct reply.

Addiction Treatment Services

Ceisteanna (137, 141)

Gerry Adams

Ceist:

137. Deputy Gerry Adams asked the Minister for Health if a dedicated addiction service for persons under 18 years of age operates in County Louth; if so, the location from which it operates; if not, his plans to address same; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [49237/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Gerry Adams

Ceist:

141. Deputy Gerry Adams asked the Minister for Health the number and location of HSE staff working in addiction services nationwide; the staff vacancies and location of each. [49241/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Health)

I propose to take Questions Nos. 137 and 141 together.

As there are service matters, they have been sent to the HSE for attention and direct reply to the Deputy.

Drug and Alcohol Task Forces

Ceisteanna (138, 139)

Gerry Adams

Ceist:

138. Deputy Gerry Adams asked the Minister for Health if there is a requirement for statutory partners to engage with regional drug and alcohol task forces. [49238/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Gerry Adams

Ceist:

139. Deputy Gerry Adams asked the Minister for Health the statutory partners which participate on the north east drug task force. [49239/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Health)

I propose to take Questions Nos. 138 and 139 together.

Maintaining a partnership approach between statutory, community and voluntary bodies is a core value of the national drugs strategy, Reducing Harm, Supporting Recovery – a health-led response to drug and alcohol use in Ireland 2017-2025.

Drug and alcohol task forces play a key role in assessing the extent and nature of the drug problem in local communities and in ensuring that a coordinated approach is taken across all sectors to address substance misuse based on the identified needs and priorities in their areas. Task forces are made up of community, voluntary and statutory representatives.

The following statutory partners are represented on the North Eastern Regional Drug and Alcohol Task Force: An Garda Síochána, Customs and Excise, the Department of Social Protection, the Education and Training Board, the HSE, Louth Co Council and the Probation Service.

I am committed to implementing an integrated public health response to substance misuse, and to supporting individuals, families and communities who are struggling with addiction and need intervention and support. Task forces working in partnership with statutory, community and voluntary sectors are central to this response.

Drug and Alcohol Task Forces

Question No. 141 answered with Question No. 137.

Ceisteanna (140)

Gerry Adams

Ceist:

140. Deputy Gerry Adams asked the Minister for Health the level of funding allocated to the north east drug task force in each of the past five years. [49240/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Health)

Drug and alcohol task forces play a key role in assessing the extent and nature of the drug problem in local communities and in ensuring that a coordinated approach is taken across all sectors to address substance misuse based on the identified needs and priorities in their areas.

The Department of Health provides €28million per annum to drug and alcohol task forces through various channels of funding, including the HSE. This funding supports over 280 community projects prioritised by Drug Task Forces in local areas and communities throughout the country.

The North Eastern Regional Drug and Alcohol Task Force received almost €928k of this allocation in 2019. This amount has remained the same for the past five years. Task force funded community projects may also receive funding from other sources, including the HSE.

The Department of Health provided additional funding of €1m in 2019 to implement key actions in the national drugs strategy. From this funding, the Department provided the North Eastern Regional Drug and Alcohol Task Force with an additional €20,000 to support its work, €10,000 of which is recurring on annual basis. This funding can be used to enhance services and meet operating costs.

The Department of Health is also providing an additional €190,000 over a three-year period to the task force to establish a new strategic health initiative; Young People’s Substance Use Support Services in Cavan & Monaghan. This initiative will improve access to health services for young people whose lives are affected by problematic alcohol and substance use in the two counties.

The initiative reflects regional priorities agreed between the community health organisation and the task forces and ensure that resources are targeted at groups most in need. It will strengthen early harm reduction responses to current and emerging trends and improve access to services for people with complex needs.

I am committed to implementing an integrated public health response to substance misuse, and to supporting those people in our communities who are struggling with addiction and need intervention and support. The task force working in partnership with statutory, community and voluntary sectors is central to this response.

Question No. 141 answered with Question No. 137.

Disease Management

Ceisteanna (142)

Peter Burke

Ceist:

142. Deputy Peter Burke asked the Minister for Health the way in which a person (details supplied) can access treatment for lyme disease when appropriate services are unavailable here; if the person can access the cross border directive to seek appropriate treatment abroad; the options available for persons who continue to suffer from the disease after accessing all treatments available here; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [49248/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Health)

Lyme disease (also known as Lyme borelliosis) is an infection caused by a spiral-shaped bacterium called Borrelia burgdorferi.  Lyme borelliosis is diagnosed by medical history and a physical examination.  The infection is confirmed by blood tests which look for antibodies to Borrelia burgdorferi produced by an infected person's body in response to the infection.  These normally take several weeks to develop and may not be present in the early stages of the disease. 

Lyme disease can be very successfully treated using common antibiotics.  These antibiotics are effective at clearing the rash and helping to prevent the development of complications.  Antibiotics are generally given for up to three weeks.  If complications develop, intravenous antibiotics may be considered.  In Ireland, treatment by most clinicians is based on that laid out in evidence-based guidelines for the management of patients with Lyme disease published by the Infectious Diseases Society of America in 2006.   

Testing and treatment for Lyme disease is available in most of the larger hospitals in Ireland, therefore, there is no necessity for Irish residents to travel to other EU Member States for diagnosis or treatment.  

Patients can seek to access health care in another EU/EEA member state via two different  schemes.  

Where a service is provided in Ireland, but a patient wishes to access care in another EU/EEA Member State, this can be possible by seeking treatment under the Directive on Patients' Rights in Cross Border Healthcare, otherwise known as the Cross Border Directive (CBD).  The HSE operates the CBD in Ireland.  Referral for care under the CBD may be made by a GP, a hospital consultant and certain other clinicians.  In line with practice in other EU Member States, the HSE through the National Contact Point (NCP) provides information for patients on the CBD on its website which can be accessed at: hse.ie/eng/services/list/1/schemes/cbd/ and also by phone at (056) 7784551.  

The HSE advises where a patient is in any doubt as to the need to seek prior authorisation before availing of a consultation or treatment abroad to contact the NCP.  

The HSE also operates the Treatment Abroad Scheme (TAS) for persons entitled to treatment in another EU/EEA Member State or Switzerland under EU Regulation (EC) No. 883/2004, as per the procedures set out in EU Regulations (EC) No. 987/2009.  The TAS provides for the cost of approved treatments in another EU/EEA member state or Switzerland through the issue of form E112 (IE) where the treatment is:

- Among the benefits provided for by Irish legislation;

- Not available in Ireland; and

- Not available within the time normally necessary for obtaining it in Ireland, taking account of the   patient's current state of health and the probable course of the disease.

GPs refer patients to consultants for acute care and it is the treating consultant who, having exhausted all treatment options including tertiary care within the country, refers the patient abroad under the terms of the TAS.  The consultant must specify the specific treatment and in making the referral accepts clinical responsibility in relation to the physician and facility abroad where the patient will attend.  Applications to the TAS are processed and a determination given in accordance with the statutory framework prior to a patient travelling to avail of treatment.  The statutory framework stipulates the patient must be a public patient and is required to have followed public patient pathways.  Information on the TAS can be accessed on the HSE website at:  hse.ie/eng/services/list/1/schemes/treatmentabroad/ and also by phoning (056) 7784551.

Medicinal Products Availability

Ceisteanna (143)

Louise O'Reilly

Ceist:

143. Deputy Louise O'Reilly asked the Minister for Health the progress made to ensure the swift provision of new medicines to persons with multiple sclerosis. [49257/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Health)

The HSE has statutory responsibility for medicine pricing and reimbursement decisions, under the Health (Pricing and Supply of Medical Goods) Act 2013. The Act specifies criteria for decisions on the reimbursement of medicines.

HSE decisions on which medicines are reimbursed by the taxpayer are made on objective, scientific and economic grounds, on the advice of the National Centre for Pharmacoeconomics (NCPE). The NCPE conducts health technology assessments (HTAs) for the HSE and makes recommendations on reimbursement to assist HSE decisions. The NCPE uses a decision framework to systematically assess a drug's clinical and cost effectiveness as a health intervention.

As a country, we invest heavily in medicines, to the tune of almost €2 billion annually. In 2019 to date, the HSE has approved 36 new drugs and newly licensed indications for existing drugs for reimbursement in the public healthcare system. The approvals to date represent an additional investment by the HSE over five years of approximately €220m in providing access to new and innovative treatment for Irish patients. It is expected that over 3,000 patients will benefit from access to these new medicines over the next 5 years.

Notwithstanding the significant progress on drug costs achieved from price reductions under the pricing framework agreed with industry and commercial negotiations conducted by the HSE, the Health Service is still facing very significant challenges in relation to the affordability of medicines.  The industry continues to develop very expensive products, particularly in the high-tech medicines area and the costs involved are a challenge for health systems even in countries with much greater resources than Ireland.

The HSE has received 2 applications for pricing and reimbursement of ocrelizumab (Ocrevus).  Application 1 is for use of Ocrelizumab for the treatment of adult patients with relapsing forms of Multiple Sclerosis (RMS) with active disease defined by clinical or imaging features. Following a number of rounds of commercial negotiations, an agreement was reached in relation to the commercial terms which will apply to this indication. The HSE intends to progress ocrelizumab for the RMS indication, which has been approved for funding from October 2019, on a patient-specific basis for this indication.

Application 2 is for the use of ocrelizumab for the treatment of adult patients with early primary progressive multiple sclerosis (PPMS) in terms of disease duration and level of disability, and with imaging features characteristic of inflammatory activity. On 4 October 2018 the NCPE completed its assessment for this indication. They did not recommend that ocrelizumab be reimbursed for this indication.

The HSE and the manufacturer have had a number of rounds of commercial negotiations in relation to this indication. Commercial discussions have concluded and the medicine has been reviewed by the HSE Drugs Group.  The HSE Senior Leadership Team have received the Drugs Group recommendation. The HSE's final decision on reimbursement will take into consideration the criteria contained in the 2013 Health Act.

The HSE has also received an application for reimbursement of Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol/Cannabidiol, THC/CBD (Sativex) which is indicated as treatment for symptom improvement in adult patients with moderate to severe spasticity due to multiple sclerosis who have not responded adequately to other anti-spasticity medication and who demonstrate clinically significant improvement in spasticity related symptoms during an initial trial of therapy.

The HSE commissioned a full HTA with respect to this indication in April 2018. On 12 August 2019, the NCPE received the applicant's submission and the HTA is currently underway.

The Government wants new and innovative medicines to be available to our citizens as quickly as possible but this can only be achieved if medicines are priced by the pharmaceutical industry in a viable and sustainable manner.

My Department and the HSE are working on making greater efficiencies in medicines usage through a range of initiatives both domestically and internationally to ensure the greatest possible access to new treatments for patients in Ireland. 

The HSE’s Medicines Management Programme (MMP), incorporating the Preferred Drugs initiative, is overseeing the implementation of a number of actions to bring about greater value for the taxpayer through cost-effective provision of medicines. These measures include the designation of preferred products with a focus on high-cost prescribing areas, in particular optimising the use of biosimilars. 

I and officials have also been engaging over the past number of years with a number of voluntary EU forums.  In June 2018, I signed the Beneluxa Initiative on Pharmaceutical Policy. This Agreement is in line with my objective to work with other European countries to identify workable solutions, in an increasingly challenging environment, to secure timely access for patients to new medicines in an affordable and sustainable way.  In June 2019, Ireland became a Founding Member of the International Horizon Scanning Initiative which is being established as part of the work programme of Beneluxa.

First Aid Training

Ceisteanna (144)

Louise O'Reilly

Ceist:

144. Deputy Louise O'Reilly asked the Minister for Health if life saving or first aid courses are required to include instructions on the steps to be taken if a person is choking while alone; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [49258/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Health)

The Pre-Hospital Emergency Care Council (PHECC) is an independent statutory body with responsibility for standards of education in pre-hospital emergency care.

Accordingly, the Deputy's query has been referred to PHECC for direct response.

Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services Staff

Ceisteanna (145)

Gerry Adams

Ceist:

145. Deputy Gerry Adams asked the Minister for Health further to Parliamentary Question No. 327 of 15 October 2019, if CHO 2 and CHO 8 do not have a consultant child and adolescent psychiatrist; if so, the length of time the positions have been vacant; the recruitment under way to address same; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [49260/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Health)

As this is a service matter I have asked the Health Service Executive to respond directly to the Deputy as soon as possible.

First Aid Training

Ceisteanna (146)

Niamh Smyth

Ceist:

146. Deputy Niamh Smyth asked the Minister for Health his plans to introduce an awareness campaign and-or training scheme for the public in the use of emergency medicines such as EpiPens; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [49262/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Health)

In 2015 the then Minister for Health introduced the 'Emergency Medicines' legislation. This allows an appropriately trained non-medical person or a pharmacist to supply and administer specified prescription-only medicines, without a prescription, to an individual for the purpose of saving life or reducing severe distress in emergency situations.

The medicines that are included in this initiative are:- adrenaline auto-injectors (epipens) (for the treatment of anaphylaxis), glyceryl trinitrate (for the treatment of unstable angina), salbutamol (for the treatment of asthma attacks), glucagon (for the treatment of diabetic hypoglycaemia), naloxone (for the treatment of opioid overdose) and medical gas mixture consisting of 50% nitrous oxide and 50% oxygen (for the management of severe pain when used by emergency rescue organisations e.g. mountain rescue teams). 

These provisions are contained in S. I. No.  449 of 2015 which amended the Prescription Regulations to allow these prescription-only medicines to be administered by trained members of the public in emergency situations. In order for an organisation, which can include schools, workplaces and other public places, to avail of an emergency medicine without the need for a prescription, members of that organisation must complete an approved course of training regarding the administration of such medicines and the management of any adverse reaction. The Pre Hospital Emergency Care Council (PHECC) has established a framework for the education and training of persons to safely and competently administer this medicine to those urgently requiring care.

It is important to note that there is nothing to prevent a person with a diagnosis of anaphylaxis who has been prescribed an Epipen from carrying their prescribed medication with them at all times, in fact this personal action is strongly recommended. This is particularly important for persons at risk of an acute medical emergency, such as an anaphylactic attack. 

Furthermore, medicines legislation permits any person to administer any medicine to another person in accordance with the directions of a registered medical practitioner. Therefore, if a person has been prescribed a medicine, but is unable to administer it to themselves, such as in the case of an overdose, there is no legal impediment to another person administering that medicine to the patient. {Regulation 4A(1)(c) of the Medicinal Products (Prescription and Control of Supply) Regulations 2003, as amended) (S.I. No. 540 of 2003)].

Hospital Waiting Lists

Ceisteanna (147)

Michael Healy-Rae

Ceist:

147. Deputy Michael Healy-Rae asked the Minister for Health the status of a hospital appointment for a person (details supplied); and if he will make a statement on the matter. [49263/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Health)

Under the Health Act 2004, the Health Service Executive (HSE) is required to manage and deliver, or arrange to be delivered on its behalf, health and personal social services. Section 6 of the HSE Governance Act 2013 bars the Minister for Health from directing the HSE to provide a treatment or a personal service to any individual or to confer eligibility on any individual.

The National Waiting List Management Policy, a standardised approach to managing scheduled care treatment for in-patient, day case and planned procedures, since January 2014, has been developed to ensure that all administrative, managerial and clinical staff follow an agreed national minimum standard for the management and administration of waiting lists for scheduled care. This policy, which has been adopted by the HSE, sets out the processes that hospitals are to implement to manage waiting lists.

In relation to the particular query raised, as this is a service matter, I have asked the HSE to respond to the Deputy directly.

Hospital Waiting Lists

Ceisteanna (148)

Michael Healy-Rae

Ceist:

148. Deputy Michael Healy-Rae asked the Minister for Health the status of a hospital appointment for a person (details supplied) in University Hospital Kerry; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [49264/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Health)

Under the Health Act 2004, the Health Service Executive (HSE) is required to manage and deliver, or arrange to be delivered on its behalf, health and personal social services. Section 6 of the HSE Governance Act 2013 bars the Minister for Health from directing the HSE to provide a treatment or a personal service to any individual or to confer eligibility on any individual.

The National Waiting List Management Policy, a standardised approach to managing scheduled care treatment for in-patient, day case and planned procedures, since January 2014, has been developed to ensure that all administrative, managerial and clinical staff follow an agreed national minimum standard for the management and administration of waiting lists for scheduled care. This policy, which has been adopted by the HSE, sets out the processes that hospitals are to implement to manage waiting lists.

In relation to the particular query raised, as this is a service matter, I have asked the HSE to respond to the Deputy directly.

Hospital Waiting Lists

Ceisteanna (149)

Michael Healy-Rae

Ceist:

149. Deputy Michael Healy-Rae asked the Minister for Health the status of a hospital appointment for a person (details supplied); and if he will make a statement on the matter. [49265/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Health)

Under the Health Act 2004, the Health Service Executive (HSE) is required to manage and deliver, or arrange to be delivered on its behalf, health and personal social services. Section 6 of the HSE Governance Act 2013 bars the Minister for Health from directing the HSE to provide a treatment or a personal service to any individual or to confer eligibility on any individual.

The National Waiting List Management Policy, a standardised approach to managing scheduled care treatment for in-patient, day case and planned procedures, since January 2014, has been developed to ensure that all administrative, managerial and clinical staff follow an agreed national minimum standard for the management and administration of waiting lists for scheduled care. This policy, which has been adopted by the HSE, sets out the processes that hospitals are to implement to manage waiting lists.

In relation to the particular query raised, as this is a service matter, I have asked the HSE to respond to the Deputy directly.

Hospital Waiting Lists

Ceisteanna (150)

Michael Healy-Rae

Ceist:

150. Deputy Michael Healy-Rae asked the Minister for Health the status of a hospital appointment for a person (details supplied) in the Coombe Women and Infants University Hospital, Dublin; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [49266/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Health)

Under the Health Act 2004, the Health Service Executive (HSE) is required to manage and deliver, or arrange to be delivered on its behalf, health and personal social services. Section 6 of the HSE Governance Act 2013 bars the Minister for Health from directing the HSE to provide a treatment or a personal service to any individual or to confer eligibility on any individual.

The National Waiting List Management Policy, a standardised approach to managing scheduled care treatment for in-patient, day case and planned procedures, since January 2014, has been developed to ensure that all administrative, managerial and clinical staff follow an agreed national minimum standard for the management and administration of waiting lists for scheduled care. This policy, which has been adopted by the HSE, sets out the processes that hospitals are to implement to manage waiting lists.

In relation to the particular query raised, as this is a service matter, I have asked the HSE to respond to the Deputy directly.

Hospital Waiting Lists

Ceisteanna (151)

Michael Healy-Rae

Ceist:

151. Deputy Michael Healy-Rae asked the Minister for Health the status of a hospital appointment for a person (details supplied); and if he will make a statement on the matter. [49267/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Health)

Under the Health Act 2004, the Health Service Executive (HSE) is required to manage and deliver, or arrange to be delivered on its behalf, health and personal social services. Section 6 of the HSE Governance Act 2013 bars the Minister for Health from directing the HSE to provide a treatment or a personal service to any individual or to confer eligibility on any individual.

The National Waiting List Management Policy, a standardised approach to managing scheduled care treatment for in-patient, day case and planned procedures, since January 2014, has been developed to ensure that all administrative, managerial and clinical staff follow an agreed national minimum standard for the management and administration of waiting lists for scheduled care. This policy, which has been adopted by the HSE, sets out the processes that hospitals are to implement to manage waiting lists.

In relation to the particular query raised, as this is a service matter, I have asked the HSE to respond to the Deputy directly.

Hospital Waiting Lists

Ceisteanna (152)

Michael Healy-Rae

Ceist:

152. Deputy Michael Healy-Rae asked the Minister for Health the status of a hospital appointment for a person (details supplied); and if he will make a statement on the matter. [49268/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Health)

Under the Health Act 2004, the Health Service Executive (HSE) is required to manage and deliver, or arrange to be delivered on its behalf, health and personal social services. Section 6 of the HSE Governance Act 2013 bars the Minister for Health from directing the HSE to provide a treatment or a personal service to any individual or to confer eligibility on any individual.

The National Waiting List Management Policy, a standardised approach to managing scheduled care treatment for in-patient, day case and planned procedures, since January 2014, has been developed to ensure that all administrative, managerial and clinical staff follow an agreed national minimum standard for the management and administration of waiting lists for scheduled care. This policy, which has been adopted by the HSE, sets out the processes that hospitals are to implement to manage waiting lists.

In relation to the particular query raised, as this is a service matter, I have asked the HSE to respond to the Deputy directly.

Hospital Waiting Lists

Ceisteanna (153)

Michael Healy-Rae

Ceist:

153. Deputy Michael Healy-Rae asked the Minister for Health the status of a hospital appointment for a person (details supplied); and if he will make a statement on the matter. [49269/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Health)

Under the Health Act 2004, the Health Service Executive (HSE) is required to manage and deliver, or arrange to be delivered on its behalf, health and personal social services. Section 6 of the HSE Governance Act 2013 bars the Minister for Health from directing the HSE to provide a treatment or a personal service to any individual or to confer eligibility on any individual.

The National Waiting List Management Policy, a standardised approach to managing scheduled care treatment for in-patient, day case and planned procedures, since January 2014, has been developed to ensure that all administrative, managerial and clinical staff follow an agreed national minimum standard for the management and administration of waiting lists for scheduled care. This policy, which has been adopted by the HSE, sets out the processes that hospitals are to implement to manage waiting lists.

In relation to the particular query raised, as this is a service matter, I have asked the HSE to respond to the Deputy directly.

Hospital Waiting Lists

Ceisteanna (154)

Michael Healy-Rae

Ceist:

154. Deputy Michael Healy-Rae asked the Minister for Health the status of a hospital appointment for a person (details supplied); and if he will make a statement on the matter. [49270/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Health)

Under the Health Act 2004, the Health Service Executive (HSE) is required to manage and deliver, or arrange to be delivered on its behalf, health and personal social services. Section 6 of the HSE Governance Act 2013 bars the Minister for Health from directing the HSE to provide a treatment or a personal service to any individual or to confer eligibility on any individual.

The National Waiting List Management Policy, a standardised approach to managing scheduled care treatment for in-patient, day case and planned procedures, since January 2014, has been developed to ensure that all administrative, managerial and clinical staff follow an agreed national minimum standard for the management and administration of waiting lists for scheduled care. This policy, which has been adopted by the HSE, sets out the processes that hospitals are to implement to manage waiting lists.

In relation to the particular query raised, as this is a service matter, I have asked the HSE to respond to the Deputy directly.