Energy Schemes Data

Questions Nos. 421 and 422 answered with Question No. 419.

Ceisteanna (420, 430)

David Cullinane

Ceist:

420. Deputy David Cullinane asked the Minister for Communications, Climate Action and Environment the estimated cost of providing a grant of €1,000 for a solar PV scheme. [38624/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Pearse Doherty

Ceist:

430. Deputy Pearse Doherty asked the Minister for Communications, Climate Action and Environment the estimated cost of providing a grant of €1,000 for a solar PV scheme. [38639/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Communications)

I propose to take Questions Nos. 420 and 430 together.

On 31 July 2018, a new micro-generation scheme to support domestic customers who install solar photovoltaic panels in their homes was introduced. The Sustainable Energy Authority of Ireland (SEAI) administer the Solar PV scheme. The available grant rate of support is indicated in the table below.

System

Support

Maximum support

Solar PV

€700 per kWp up to a max 2kWp

€1,400

Solar PV with battery energy storage system

€700 per kWp up to a max 4kWp

€1,000 per battery system

€3,800

The statistics, provided by SEAI, listed in the table below are those recorded up to 5 September 2019. There has been a total of 1850 applications to that date, with a related grant support of €4.4 million:

Ireland

Number

Grant Support

Installed Capacity

Lifetime (20yr) Carbon Abatement

Installed & Paid

1034

€2,261,280

3,304 kWp

21,476 tCO2

Open Applications

816

€2,130,945

2,938 kWp

19,100 tCO2

The pilot scheme is subject to a review and the costs of installation will be assessed and further opportunities to broaden this scheme to other groups and other technologies will be explored.

Questions Nos. 421 and 422 answered with Question No. 419.

Wind Energy Generation

Ceisteanna (423)

David Cullinane

Ceist:

423. Deputy David Cullinane asked the Minister for Communications, Climate Action and Environment the estimated cost of construction of an offshore wind farm. [38628/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Communications)

I am unable to provide an estimated cost of construction of an offshore wind farm as this is a commercial matter for project developers.

The Climate Action Plan sets out the necessary policy measures to help meet our 2030 targets, cut our reliance on fossil fuels and put Ireland on a clear pathway to meeting our 2050 objectives. It includes a suite of actions to decarbonise the electricity sector and boost the quantity of renewable generation in order to meet our target of 70% of demand from renewable sources by 2030. The cost of offshore wind has been falling globally driven by technological advances and competitive auction pressures. The Climate Action Plan commits to connecting at least 3.5GW of Offshore Wind by 2030. The Plan is available on my Department’s website: www.dccae.gov.ie

To realise Ireland’s ambition for large-scale development of offshore wind, significant progress is required on the following:

· The Development management process;

· a route to market;

· a supporting electricity grid model.

The Marine Planning and Development Management (MPDM) Bill, currently under development, will allow the State to regulate offshore energy projects beyond the foreshore.. The Bill is due for publication by the end of this year.

The inclusion of specific support for offshore wind in the Renewable Electricity Support Scheme (RESS) design will be transformative and, in the long run, will deliver the scale of renewables required to decarbonise our electricity system.

My Department has also established a Working Group on the Framework for Offshore Electricity Grid. It will assess the options available for a suitable offshore grid model for Ireland informed by and aligned to Government Policy.

Energy Efficiency

Ceisteanna (424)

David Cullinane

Ceist:

424. Deputy David Cullinane asked the Minister for Communications, Climate Action and Environment the estimated cost of universal insulation for 808,000 homes. [38631/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Communications)

The cost of insulating homes can vary significantly from property to property. Key factors which determine the cost include the type of insulation required, the size of the property and whether there is any existing insulation to be upgraded. It is not, therefore, possible to cost the provision of universal insulation to 808,000 homes.

The Government’s Climate Action Plan sets an ambitious target of 500,000 home retrofits to Building Energy Rating ‘B2’ by 2030. I recently announced the establishment of a Retrofit Taskforce that will drive the achievement of this commitment. The Taskforce which will drive the development of a new national delivery model, which will group homes together, create easy pay back mechanisms (e.g. through your electricity bill) and find smart financing. The Taskforce will:

- Design a pilot to take place in 2020 in both an urban and a rural area to test the model

- Audit the models that exist both in Ireland and internationally, for delivering energy efficiency measures by aggregating premises

- Design smart finance options to leverage government funding to the best effect

- Design the most appropriate tender for the delivery of the aggregated model

- Assess the scope for easy pay models e.g. an equivalent 'bike to work' scheme. Homeowners who choose to upgrade can expect lower energy bills so there may also be potential for a scheme which allows for pay back through utility bills

- Consider how best to ensure a strong pipeline of talent, through apprenticeships, traineeships and upskilling and how best to build a strong supply chain

Electric Vehicles

Question No. 426 answered with Question No. 399.

Questions Nos. 427 and 428 answered with Question No. 417.

Question No. 429 answered with Question No. 419.

Question No. 430 answered with Question No. 420.

Questions Nos. 431 and 432 answered with Question No. 419.

Ceisteanna (425)

David Cullinane

Ceist:

425. Deputy David Cullinane asked the Minister for Communications, Climate Action and Environment the estimated cost of 1,000 electric car charging points. [38632/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Communications)

There is a range of electric vehicle charge points to suit different needs including home charge points, on-street charge points and fast chargers. The cost of such charge points can vary from several hundred euro to many thousands.

My Department, through the SEAI, provides a grant of up to €600 to support the installation of home charge points. Supporting 1,000 such charge points would cost my Department up to €600,000.

A new support for on-street charge points is being introduced , again through the SEAI, which will support 75% of the capital cost up to a maximum of €5,000 per charge point. Supporting 1,000 such charge points would cost my Department up to €5,000,000.

Question No. 426 answered with Question No. 399.
Questions Nos. 427 and 428 answered with Question No. 417.
Question No. 429 answered with Question No. 419.
Question No. 430 answered with Question No. 420.
Questions Nos. 431 and 432 answered with Question No. 419.

Sports Organisations

Ceisteanna (433)

Martin Heydon

Ceist:

433. Deputy Martin Heydon asked the Minister for Transport, Tourism and Sport the groups, clubs and stakeholders that were invited to the football forum in the Mansion House on 31 May 2019. [38225/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Transport)

The Irish Football Stakeholders Forum which was held on 31st May 2019 brought together a broad cross section of representatives of players, coaches, clubs, leagues, grassroots, officials, volunteers, supporters, sports industry, academics, FAI staff and youth football to discuss the future of Irish football and the Football Association of Ireland. The Forum was attended by a truly diverse and inclusive group of stakeholders from across the Irish football community who participated in a strong and fruitful discussion and sharing of views on the day.

For data protection reasons, I am not in a position to release the full invitation list.

Living Wage

Ceisteanna (434)

Maurice Quinlivan

Ceist:

434. Deputy Maurice Quinlivan asked the Minister for Transport, Tourism and Sport the number of workers employed by his Department and in each office or agency under the aegis of his Department who earn less than the living wage of €12.30 per hour; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [38248/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Transport)

There are approximately 66 full-time workers employed by this Department that earn less than the living wage of €12.30 per hour.

I have forwarded the Deputy's question to the agencies under the aegis of my Department for direct response. Please contact my private office if you do not receive a reply within 10 working days.

Bus Services

Ceisteanna (435)

Tony McLoughlin

Ceist:

435. Deputy Tony McLoughlin asked the Minister for Transport, Tourism and Sport the position regarding the provision of a new bus schedule service on the S1 and S2 services in Sligo town, in particular a new service for the Treacy Avenue area of Sligo town; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [38270/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Transport)

As Minister for Transport, Tourism and Sport, I have responsibility for policy and overall funding in relation to public transport. The issue raised is a matter for the National Transport Authority (NTA) in conjunction with Bus Éireann and I have forwarded the Deputy's question to the NTA for direct reply. Please advise my private office if you do not receive a response within ten working days.

Brexit Preparations

Ceisteanna (436, 441)

Aindrias Moynihan

Ceist:

436. Deputy Aindrias Moynihan asked the Minister for Transport, Tourism and Sport the status of preparations for facilitating persons and materials travelling through Cork Airport in the event of a no-deal Brexit; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [37469/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Aindrias Moynihan

Ceist:

441. Deputy Aindrias Moynihan asked the Minister for Transport, Tourism and Sport the up-to-date preparations for facilitating persons and materials travelling through Cork Airport in the event of a no-deal Brexit; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [38348/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Transport)

I propose to take Questions Nos. 436 and 441 together.

The Government’s current assessment is that there is a significant risk of a no-deal Brexit, which will have profound implications for Ireland. The Government has been preparing for Brexit for over three years to make sure that Irish citizens and businesses are as ready as possible for all scenarios. No-deal preparations have always had the highest priority and intensive engagement with stakeholders across all sectors continues.

As the Deputy will be aware, the European Commission last year put forward a draft legislative proposal aimed at ensuring basic air connectivity in a no-deal Brexit scenario. The measures provide a degree of certainty to the Irish aviation sector and to the travelling public.

Under the Common Travel Area (CTA), Irish and British citizens move freely and reside in either jurisdiction and enjoy associated rights and entitlements. Both the Government of Ireland and the UK Government have committed to maintaining the CTA in all circumstances. In light of these factors, therefore, all direct flights between Ireland and the UK will still be able to operate post-Brexit.

At present, UK passport holders are processed through the EU channel at Irish airports and this will continue, with the EU channel being re-designated as an EU/UK channel. I understand that Cork Airport has identified all signs that would need to be amended, and will have customer services staff available to direct passengers, as necessary.

The establishment of the additional agriculture, health and customs checks which will be required at ports and airports in the event of no-deal is being co-ordinated by an interdepartmental group under the chairmanship of the Department of Public Expenditure and Reform. The group has focused on three locations which we rely heavily upon for our connectivity, namely, Dublin Port, Dublin Airport and Rosslare Europort. The Office of Public Works has been tasked with delivering the required facilities for these checks at these locations. Cork Airport is not expected to require any additional infrastructure to deal with any potential changes resulting from the UK’s departure from the European Union.

Government also supports the development of air connectivity and the expansion of air services more generally through funding from Tourism Ireland for cooperative marketing activity. An increased budget allocation in Tourism Ireland for 2019 will continue to support both seasonal and regional growth and will be underscored by a commitment to focus co-operative partnership activities for Great Britain and the North American and European markets. I continue to encourage all airports to avail of this funding to optimise air services.

Brexit Preparations

Ceisteanna (437, 440)

Aindrias Moynihan

Ceist:

437. Deputy Aindrias Moynihan asked the Minister for Transport, Tourism and Sport the status of preparations for facilitating persons and materials travelling through the Port of Cork in the event of a no-deal Brexit; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [37470/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Aindrias Moynihan

Ceist:

440. Deputy Aindrias Moynihan asked the Minister for Transport, Tourism and Sport the up-to-date preparations for facilitating persons and materials travelling through the Port of Cork in the event of a no-deal Brexit; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [38345/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Transport)

I propose to take Questions Nos. 437 and 440 together.

The Government’s current assessment is that there is a significant risk of a no-deal Brexit, which will have profound implications for Ireland. The Government has been preparing for Brexit for over three years to make sure that Irish citizens and businesses are as ready as possible for all scenarios. No-deal preparations have always had the highest priority and there has been intensive engagement with stakeholders across all sectors.

The Port of Cork is currently undertaking major development works including the construction of a new container terminal at Ringaskiddy. This work will a provide for future increases in trade and national port capacity requirements by facilitating larger sized vessels and increased tonnage and throughput.

The establishment of the additional controls at ports that would be required in a no deal Brexit scenario is being co-ordinated by an interdepartmental group under the chairmanship of the Department of Public Expenditure and Reform, with representation from a range of stakeholders across Government. The group has focused on two locations for which we are heavily dependent on connectivity to the UK, namely, Dublin Port, and Rosslare Europort. The Office of Public Works has been tasked with delivering the required facilities for these agriculture, health and customs checks at these locations. I understand that Port of Cork is also engaging with these State Agencies.

My Department has also sought to assess the existing maritime capacity for direct sailings between Ireland and continental EU ports as a potential alternative route for trade currently using the Landbridge and has established that there is capacity in ports other than Dublin and Rosslare that could be of some assistance in the event of a no deal Brexit. The main spare capacity available in 2019 is in relation to Lift-on/ Lift -off (LOLO) traffic, in Cork, among others, and for bulk, rather than in respect of Roll-on/ Roll-off (RORO) traffic. Should there be a modal shift from RORO to LOLO, the port of Cork has spare capacity to cater for additional LOLO.

Budget Submissions

Ceisteanna (438)

Brendan Smith

Ceist:

438. Deputy Brendan Smith asked the Minister for Transport, Tourism and Sport if he will consider the issues raised in a budget 2020 submission (details supplied) taking into account the additional challenges facing the sector due to Brexit; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [38330/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Transport)

My Department continues to work with the haulage industry, including representative organisations, in relation to the sector. The haulage sector plays an important role in our economy and I recognise that it faces particular difficulties in the face of Brexit. Brexit preparedness and contingency work is being taken forward on a whole of Government basis, across all Government Departments and Agencies.

My Department is aware of the submission made the Irish Road Haulage Association in relation to Budget 2020. However, the issues and proposals therein are primarily for my colleague the Minister for Finance. I note that he has also received this question and can be expected to reply directly in this regard.

Budget Submissions

Ceisteanna (439)

Brendan Smith

Ceist:

439. Deputy Brendan Smith asked the Minister for Transport, Tourism and Sport if consideration will be given to the issues raised in a budget 2020 submission by an organisation (details supplied) in respect of the tourism sector and concerns in relation to the difficulties that Brexit that will cause for the sector; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [38333/19]

Amharc ar fhreagra

Freagraí scríofa (Ceist ar Transport)

I am aware of the severe negative effects that a no deal Brexit would have on the tourism sector, in particular in the border regions. Accordingly, while the Budget is a matter for my colleague the Minister for Finance and Public Expenditure and Reform, I am making a strong case for tourism in all my pre-budget discussions with my Government colleagues to best mitigate the impact of Brexit on the tourism industry.

A number of the other issues raised such as taxation, local authority rates and insurance costs are not under the aegis of my Department, however I continue to represent tourism interests in the development of policies across Government on these and other matters that impact on the competitiveness of our tourism industry.